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See detailSymposium: Early detection and prevention of cognitive decline and dementia: Findings from major European collaborative and research initiatives
Leist, Anja UL

Scientific Conference (2019, May)

With still no medical cure for dementia available, major research initiatives have been set up to investigate and target the development of dementia at earlier stages. Several ongoing projects focus on ... [more ▼]

With still no medical cure for dementia available, major research initiatives have been set up to investigate and target the development of dementia at earlier stages. Several ongoing projects focus on early detection of dementia with the hope to be able to administer personalized interventions for individuals at high risk. Ongoing clinical trials test different interventions on their potential to prevent or delay the onset of dementia. Complementing those efforts, large and long-spanning observational studies can be used to detect long-term precursors of cognitive aging. Indeed, there is increasing evidence for a large window of opportunity for intervention of several decades that could be used for preventative efforts in dementia. The symposium will bring together major European collaborative and research initiatives in the field of early detection and prevention of dementia. The first part of the symposium will present findings from clinical trials, the second part new findings coming from a range of observational studies. The first paper will report on the design and study cohorts of the European Prevention of Alzheimer’s Dementia Consortium (EPAD) and the TriBEKa project. The second paper will focus on new multifactorial models to quantify prevention potential based on the FINGER trial. The third paper will report an integrated analysis of four longitudinal studies of ageing (OCT0, H70, LASA, and MAP) to evaluate the role of cognitively stimulating activities in the transitions from cognitively normal to slightly impaired, severely impaired, and death with multi-state models. The fourth paper will present the contribution of environmental factors over the life course, in particular air pollution, on cognitive change in the Lothian Birth Cohort of 1936. The last paper makes use of recent developments in approaching causal inference in observational studies and applies these to predict cognitive aging and dementia with data from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe. [less ▲]

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See detailAssessing social interaction quality with the Experience Sampling Method
Knickenberg, Margarita; Zurbriggen, Carmen UL; Venetz, Martin

Scientific Conference (2019, May)

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See detailWho’s afraid of Donkey Kong? Testing the Stereotype Threat Effect in Video Gaming
Holl, Elisabeth UL; Wagener, Gary L.; Melzer, André UL

Scientific Conference (2019, May)

In two studies (Study 1: N = 130; Study 2: N = 56) participants played a video game (Bejeweled 3; SkyChasers) and were either confronted with a stereotype threat (ST) or not. ST is defined as the risk of ... [more ▼]

In two studies (Study 1: N = 130; Study 2: N = 56) participants played a video game (Bejeweled 3; SkyChasers) and were either confronted with a stereotype threat (ST) or not. ST is defined as the risk of confirming a negative stereotype about one’s own group and has been investigated in various field, i.a. in gaming. In the first study participants were confronted with the stereotype that women would perform worse in video games than men. In the second study we worked with a reversed stereotype, namely that women would have now outpaced males in some genres of video games. Our results show that performance varies across gender and genre. Although we did not find the hypothesized interaction effect of gender and ST condition in performance, self-reported measures, such as perceived frustration, and moderating variables indicate performance differences both for women and men, but on different psychological dimensions. [less ▲]

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See detailDeveloping literacy in linguistically diverse children
Wealer, Cyril UL; Fricke, Silke; Engel de Abreu, Pascale UL

Scientific Conference (2019, May)

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See detailInnovative work behaviors of entrepreneurs: The role of resilience and satisfaction with life
Palmer, Carolin; Jaouen, Annabelle; Gundolf, Katherine et al

Scientific Conference (2019, May)

We examine the antecedents of entrepreneurs’ innovative work behavior through the prism of two personality variables: resilience and satisfaction with life. Based on a sample of 325 French entrepreneurs ... [more ▼]

We examine the antecedents of entrepreneurs’ innovative work behavior through the prism of two personality variables: resilience and satisfaction with life. Based on a sample of 325 French entrepreneurs, we find a direct effect of both variables. [less ▲]

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See detailRise of the machines - Moral decisions in Detroit: Become Human
Holl, Elisabeth UL

Scientific Conference (2019, May)

Moral decisions in video games have become increasingly popular. This work in progress project applies established theories on mediated morality (e.g., MIME; Tamborini, 2011) to the cutting-edge video ... [more ▼]

Moral decisions in video games have become increasingly popular. This work in progress project applies established theories on mediated morality (e.g., MIME; Tamborini, 2011) to the cutting-edge video game Detroit: Become Human. The in the game implemented feature of displaying world statistics provides valuable information on how players engage in meaningful moral decision within a virtual world. Statistics will be aggregated and analyzed in relation to the available decision time span, the involved characters and different moral foundations. [less ▲]

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See detailMulticultural society - multiple ways to negotiate identity
Murdock, Elke UL

Scientific Conference (2019, April 30)

The 21st century has been called the “age of migration” (Castles & Miller, 2009). International migration is a growing phenomenon, both in terms of scope and complexity and affects virtually all countries ... [more ▼]

The 21st century has been called the “age of migration” (Castles & Miller, 2009). International migration is a growing phenomenon, both in terms of scope and complexity and affects virtually all countries in the world (United Nations, 2009). The global migration system has changed over recent decades with regard to origins and destinations for migration. In the 20th century, Europe was a major area for emigration, but has now become a target for immigration, with most European countries, including Iceland, hosting significant minority immigrant populations. In Luxembourg, nearly half of the population is foreign – the foreign population percentage currently stands at 48%. Within this context majority and minority become fluid with the migration process itself being fluid, ranging from daily migration (transnational commuters), to medium-term stays, return visits and permanent immigration including uptake of citizenship. Within such a plurally composed society, culture contact is a permanent feature in daily life. Nationality becomes a salient feature as culture contact tends to prompt reflection, resulting in questioning and (re-)negotiation of national identity. This affects both the native and the diverse immigrant population – with diversity going beyond the level of country of origin as many individuals have very complex biographies. Using multicultural, multilingual Luxembourg as a case study example, I will present examples for the construal process of national identity for different groups, illustrating how (national) identity is negotiated at individual level. As can be expected, the identity construal process becomes more complex within a multicultural context. [less ▲]

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See detailChair and Commentator: European Union: Immigration and Border Control
Venken, Machteld UL

Scientific Conference (2019, April 25)

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See detailMixed Integer Linear Programming Model for the Optimal Operation of a Dual Source Heat Pump
Rafii-Tabrizi, Sasan UL; Hadji-Minaglou, Jean-Régis UL; Scholzen, Frank UL

Scientific Conference (2019, April 24)

This paper presents a mixed integer linear programming (MILP) model to optimally operate a dual source heat pump (DSHP). The DSHP draws environmental energy from an underground ice storage tank (IST) or ... [more ▼]

This paper presents a mixed integer linear programming (MILP) model to optimally operate a dual source heat pump (DSHP). The DSHP draws environmental energy from an underground ice storage tank (IST) or wind infrared sensitive collectors (WISC). WISC is further used to regenerate the IST. The thermal output of the DSHP is stored in a thermal energy storage (TES). A single-objective optimization approach is applied to minimize the operational cost of the DSHP over a scheduling horizon of 24h. The developed framework is tested on various days, which are representative for each season of the year. Furthermore, it is investigated how variable electricity price market data influence the dynamic behaviour of the DSHP. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Importance of Socio-Emotional Skills and Behaviour in Preschool for Later Outcomes
Aleksic, Gabrijela UL; Christine, Merrell; Peter, Tymms

Scientific Conference (2019, April 18)

Background to the Study In order to meet the socio-economic challenges of the 21st century, a blend of cognitive and socio-emotional skills is required (Temple, 2002). Socio-emotional skills are important ... [more ▼]

Background to the Study In order to meet the socio-economic challenges of the 21st century, a blend of cognitive and socio-emotional skills is required (Temple, 2002). Socio-emotional skills are important for personal well-being, life satisfaction, healthy life styles, active citizenship and safer societies (OECD, 2015). No study in Serbia has investigated the development of young children’s socio-emotional skills and behaviour, and the relationship with academic progress in Serbia before and this directly responds to the urgent call for more information concerning the Serbian preschool education (Baucal et al., 2016). The findings are of broader relevance to other countries; as noted in the OECD (2015) report, socio-emotional development continues through late childhood and adolescence which gives a space for intervention programmes that can help reduce social inequalities among children. Theoretical Framework Socio-emotional skills are a range of competences including emotion knowledge, emotional and behavioural regulatory abilities and social skills (Denham, 2006). When children enter school and have positive peer and teacher interactions, they will develop more positive attitudes towards school tasks, engage more into school activities, be more persistent and perform higher (e.g., Arnold et al., 2012; Fantuzzo et al., 2007). Furthermore, studies have shown that children with behavioural difficulties such as inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity display more delinquent behaviour as adolescents and achieve academically lower than their peers (e.g., Frazier et al., 2007; Merrell et al., 2017). Data In this empirical study we explored the links between socio-emotional skills, behaviour, mathematics and literacy performance of preschool children in Serbia over the course of 14 months. Teachers rated 159 children (51% of girls) aged 5-8 by Personal, social and emotional development scale, and Behaviour rating scale on inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity. These scales were included in the Performance Indicators in Primary School (PIPS; Tymms, 1999), an adaptive test that measures early literacy and mathematics. Results • At all three times, girls were rated more positively than boys in socio-emotional skills and behaviour, except for adjustment to school setting where there were no differences. • At Time 3, when children entered school, their socio-emotional skills and behaviour were associated with gender, mathematics at Time 1 and their socio-emotional and behaviour ratings at Time 2, controlling for maternal education at Time 1. • Mathematics at Time 3 was not associated with socio-emotional skills nor with specific behaviour. • Literacy at Time 3 was associated with mathematics and social skills at Time 1, and literacy at Time 2, controlling for gender and maternal education. Significance of the Study This study offers the first insight into the links between socio-emotional skills, behaviour and mathematics and literacy performance of preschool children in Serbia which will inform the development and evaluation of interventions. Attrition of the sample limits the findings. [less ▲]

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See detailHow can we support lecturers in English-medium instruction?
Deroey, Katrien UL

Scientific Conference (2019, April 13)

English-medium instruction (EMI) is a worldwide phenomenon. EMI language and communication issues (e.g. Hu et al., 2014; Murray, 2015; Werther et al., 2014) have led to calls for EAP practitioners to ... [more ▼]

English-medium instruction (EMI) is a worldwide phenomenon. EMI language and communication issues (e.g. Hu et al., 2014; Murray, 2015; Werther et al., 2014) have led to calls for EAP practitioners to collaborate with lecturers and other HE stakeholders to explore ways in which these lecturers can be supported and teaching standards ensured (Coleman, 2006; Doiz et al., 2013; Dubow & Gundermann, 2017). The design and implementation of EMI training and support programmes can be an especially challenging task for EAP practitioners. First, lecturers may not recognize the need for support and may be reluctant to be assessed. Second, we need to factor in practical considerations such as their limited availability and possible reluctance to attend ‘classes’ with colleagues. Third, we have limited resources in terms of specialized standardized tests, training materials and research literature that could inform our 'course' design. Innovative approaches are therefore needed to factor in all these circumstances. This paper has two main parts. First I summarize research on the challenges EMI lecturers face, including the results of a needs analysis among lecturers at the University of Luxembourg and my work on lecture discourse organization (Deroey, 2015). From the relatively few studies that exist, we will see that lecturers tend to believe they have sufficient English language skills and that reduced interactivity is a particularly common issue. Second, I survey different support and training schemes at HE institutions across the world. Here, it will become clear that work on relevant pedagogical skills needs to be included and an apparently ‘remedial’ approach should be avoided if we want to get lecturers on board. [less ▲]

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See detailDigitisation of musicology at the University of Luxembourg
Sagrillo, Damien UL

Scientific Conference (2019, April 13)

One of the aims of the new government of Luxembourg is to enhance digitisation in all dimensions of daily life. Since years already the literature archive runs a dictionary of Luxembourgish authors. I ... [more ▼]

One of the aims of the new government of Luxembourg is to enhance digitisation in all dimensions of daily life. Since years already the literature archive runs a dictionary of Luxembourgish authors. I will present two projects funded by the Ministry of Culture aiming also to promote and to valorise the musical heritage of Luxembourg by compiling an Encyclopedia of Luxembourg Musicians and by editing the music of Luxembourgish composer Laurent Menager. [less ▲]

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See detailMessung von Ambivalenzen: Ambivalenzerfahrungen zwischen jungen Erwachsenen und ihren Eltern
Albert, Isabelle UL

Scientific Conference (2019, April 12)

Die vorliegende Studie beschäftigte sich mit den Ambivalenzerfahrungen junger Erwachsener und der Rolle des Auszugs aus dem Elternhaus. Die Teilnehmer wohnten entweder noch bei den Eltern, waren bereits ... [more ▼]

Die vorliegende Studie beschäftigte sich mit den Ambivalenzerfahrungen junger Erwachsener und der Rolle des Auszugs aus dem Elternhaus. Die Teilnehmer wohnten entweder noch bei den Eltern, waren bereits komplett ausgezogen oder pendelten zwischen dem Wohnort der Eltern und dem Studienort. Ausgangspunkt war die Frage, ob sogenannte „exit options“ die Erfahrung von Ambivalenz verringern können (siehe auch Dykstra & Komter, 2010). Im Folgenden werden anhand dieser Studie verschiedene Möglichkeiten der direkten und indirekten Erfassung von Ambivalenz veranschaulicht sowie inhaltliche Ergebnisse präsentiert. [less ▲]

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See detailADVANCES IN GEOMETRY INDEPENDENT APPROXIMATIONS
Anitescu, Cosmin; Atroshchenko, Elena; Bordas, Stéphane UL et al

Scientific Conference (2019, April 11)

We present recent advances in geometry independent field approximations. The GIFT approach is a generalisation of isogeometric analysis where the approximation used to describe the field variables no ... [more ▼]

We present recent advances in geometry independent field approximations. The GIFT approach is a generalisation of isogeometric analysis where the approximation used to describe the field variables no-longer has to be identical to the approximation used to describe the geometry of the domain. As such, the geometry can be described using usual CAD representations, e.g. NURBS, which are the most common in the CAD area, whilst local refinement and meshes approximations can be used to describe the field variables, enabling local adaptivity. We show in which cases the approach passes the patch test and present applications to various mechanics, fracture and multi-physics problems. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 326 (24 UL)
See detailLes résistances belge et luxembourgeoise et leurs conceptions européennes
Brüll, Christoph UL

Scientific Conference (2019, April 10)

La deuxième Occupation allemande en un quart de siècle a vu se développer en Belgique et au Luxembourg une série de mouvements de Résistance aux caractéristiques et conceptions politiques très diverses ... [more ▼]

La deuxième Occupation allemande en un quart de siècle a vu se développer en Belgique et au Luxembourg une série de mouvements de Résistance aux caractéristiques et conceptions politiques très diverses. Parmi les Résistants qui s’interrogent sur l’après-guerre, deux tendances lourdes s’affirment : le rétablissement de l’indépendance nationale et la démilitarisation d’une Allemagne vaincue. Il en résulte aussi des plans pour l’Europe qui reposent toutefois rarement sur une approche systématique de la question. Une importance cruciale revient à la question des liens entre mouvements de Résistance et gouvernements en exil. Par ailleurs, il y a des personnalités qui, comme le futur Premier ministre luxembourgeois Pierre Werner, s’engagent aux côtés de la Résistance française et réfléchissent sur l’avenir du continent. La contribution se propose d’établir un inventaire de ces initiatives et d’adopter (là où c’est possible) une perspective comparatiste. Finalement, nous examinerons le rôle des mouvements de Résistance dans la vie politique de l’après-guerre et l’engagement de certains Résistants dans les débuts de l’intégration européenne après 1945. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 105 (7 UL)
See detailIntegrated micromechanical model for slope stability analysis
Kabore, Brice Wendlassida UL; Peters, Bernhard UL

Scientific Conference (2019, April 09)

Advances in supercomputing hardware have made it possible to handle highly complex geomechanical analysis with large data. Thus, particle-based methods are gaining an ever-increasing interest with ... [more ▼]

Advances in supercomputing hardware have made it possible to handle highly complex geomechanical analysis with large data. Thus, particle-based methods are gaining an ever-increasing interest with massively parallel programs being developed. These methods have been applied to the analysis of failure mechanisms and scenarios such as mass movement in landslides, avalanches under static, dynamic or seismic loading condition. They provide deep insights into the meso and micro-scale mechanisms leading to macroscopic instabilities. This contribution describes a micromechanical model for stability analysis and simulation in natural or man-made slopes under complex loading and boundary conditions. Based on the micromechanics of loose granular and compacted geomaterial, microstructural change, viscoelastic deformations, fracture, and healing are explicitly integrated into a coupled discrete particle and beam lattice model. Stress-based failure criteria and energy based dissipation and frictional contact are employed. Both gravity increase and strength reduction methods have been employed to evaluate the Factor of Safety (FoS) and potential failure surface and compared. With an emphasis on the impact of the microstructure and its spatial variability on stress-induced microcracks and crack propagation, this study outlines material models and properties relevant to stability analysis. Special focus has been put on layered slopes which present varying shear strength along the depth formed over time according to pressure, temperature, and moisture such as snowpack. This microstructural approach unifies geometrical and material information and allows the structural assembling layers of different strength. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Influence of Professional Development on Early Years Teachers’ and Educators’ Attitudes and Practices in Luxembourg
Kirsch, Claudine UL

Scientific Conference (2019, April 09)

The present case-study based in multilingual Luxembourg reports on the influence of professional development on two preschool teachers’ attitudes towards multilingual education and their emerging ... [more ▼]

The present case-study based in multilingual Luxembourg reports on the influence of professional development on two preschool teachers’ attitudes towards multilingual education and their emerging multilingual practices. The need for multilingual pedagogies has been recognized and several countries in Europe have implemented multilingual programs in early childhood (García, Lin, & May, 2017; Panagiotopoulou, 2016). Nevertheless, practices often remain monolingual and focus on the development of the majority language (Kratzmann et al., 2017). In Luxembourg, new laws were voted in 2017 that require preschool teachers to develop the three-to-five -year-olds’ skills in Luxembourgish, familiarize them with French, and value home languages. Before 2017, the language policy focused on Luxembourgish. Nevertheless, some teachers had implemented multilingual practices to address the diverse language needs of the children (Kirsch, 2017). In 2015/16, 63,5 % of the four-year-olds did not speak Luxembourgish as a home language (MENJE, 2017). To develop inclusive multilingual practices, researchers at the University of Luxembourg developed a professional development program (thereafter PD) based on the pedagogy of translanguaging (García et al., 2017). The latter is supportive of social justice, places the learners at the centre and gives them some agency over their language use. The 30-hour program was collaborative and inquiry-based and included coaching. The practitioners were invited to implement activities based on books and rhymes in several languages and video-record these activities. The professionals reflected on their practices in the meetings. The research project drew on both qualitative and quantitative research methods. The data collection drew on a questionnaire completed before, during and after the PD; six interviews; six observations of the course and 15 video-recorded classroom activities; four coaching reports and emails after the coaching. The methods of data analysis include paired samples t-test, correlational analysis and content analysis (Braun & Clark, 2006). The findings show a positive effect of PD on the teachers’ knowledge about language learning and their attitudes towards multilingual education. At the beginning of the course, both teachers were influenced by the monolingual language policy in place, parental expectation, and the belief that children learn less Luxembourgish if they encountered other languages. The initial sceptics changed once the teachers began to implement activities in French and home languages, and realized the children’s motivation,engagement and continued progress in Luxembourgish. Both incorporated rituals and regular activities that drew on multiple languages. Both repeatedly acknowledged the impact of the PD, stating that the instruction, the reflection on their activities and the feedback helped them develop different perspectives on their own teaching. The findings of this study confirm that long-term, collaborative and inquiry-based professional development can be transformative (Gaikhorst et al., 2017; Kennedy, 2005; Prenger et al., 2017). They also contribute to the dearth of literature on PD on multilingual education in early years (Egert, 2015). [less ▲]

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See detailEnergy Systemic Risk
Decet, Romain; Lehnert, Thorsten UL

Scientific Conference (2019, April 06)

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See detailConvergence, concurrence, harmonisation – une analyse comparative de la fiscalité Be-Ne-Lux (1945-1992)
Danescu, Elena UL

Scientific Conference (2019, April 04)

The paper aims to investigate the concept, context and socio-economic consequences of fiscal competition and fiscal justice, with a focus on the taxation of Beneux countries. The analysis is carried out ... [more ▼]

The paper aims to investigate the concept, context and socio-economic consequences of fiscal competition and fiscal justice, with a focus on the taxation of Beneux countries. The analysis is carried out at the intersection of several historical fields – national, regional, European and international –, and in a interdisciplinary approach. The research is based on a wide range of primary sources (original archives from Luxembourg, Belgium, the Netherlands, France, Germany and international organisations), by taking into account of a variety of institutions, players and mechanisms, and through the prism of the existing literature in the field. The findings emerged of this analysis may make a valuable addition to this historiography and provide new information, nuances and interpretations in the ongoing debates. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 107 (0 UL)
See detailResearch visit, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand
Wolff, Christian UL

Scientific Conference (2019, April)

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (1 UL)
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See detailPricing Perspective for SWIPT in OFDM-based Multi-User Wireless Cooperative Systems
Gautam, Sumit UL; Lagunas, Eva UL; Vuppala, Satyanarayana UL et al

Scientific Conference (2019, April)

We propose a novel formulation for joint maximization of total weighted sum-spectral efficiency and weighted sum-harvested energy to study Simultaneous Wireless Information and Power Transfer (SWIPT) from ... [more ▼]

We propose a novel formulation for joint maximization of total weighted sum-spectral efficiency and weighted sum-harvested energy to study Simultaneous Wireless Information and Power Transfer (SWIPT) from a pricing perspective. Specifically, we consider that a transmit source communicates with multiple destinations using Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) system within a dual-hop relay-assisted network, where the destination nodes are capable of jointly decoding information and harvesting energy from the same radio-frequency (RF) signal using either the time-switching (TS) or power-splitting (PS) based SWIPT receiver architectures. Computation of the optimal solution for the aforementioned problem is an extremely challenging task as joint optimization of several network resources introduce intractability at high numeric values of relays, destination nodes and OFDM sub-carriers. Therefore, we present a suitable algorithm with sub-optimal results and good performance to compute the performance of joint data processing and harvesting energy under fixed pricing methods by adjusting the respective weight factors, motivated by practical statistics. Furthermore, by exploiting the binary options of the weights, we show that the proposed formulation can be regulated purely as a sum-spectral efficiency maximization or solely as a sum-harvested energy maximization problem. Numerical results illustrate the benefits of the proposed design under several operating conditions and parameter values. [less ▲]

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See detailMortgages and Life Time Contracts
Ratti, Luca UL

Scientific Conference (2019, April)

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See detailExploration of Different School Value-Added Models in a Highly Heterogeneous Educational Context
Levy, Jessica UL; Brunner, Martin; Keller, Ulrich UL et al

Scientific Conference (2019, April)

Detailed reference viewed: 121 (16 UL)
See detailMicrofluidic Wet Spinning of Core-Sheath Elastomer-Liquid Crystal Fibers
Honaker, Lawrence William UL; Vats, Shameek UL; Anyfantakis, Emmanouil UL et al

Scientific Conference (2019, March 29)

Liquid crystals encapsulated in fibers have a wide variety of applications in sensing. In order to produce these, several methods have been explored. Electrospinning is among the better-known techniques ... [more ▼]

Liquid crystals encapsulated in fibers have a wide variety of applications in sensing. In order to produce these, several methods have been explored. Electrospinning is among the better-known techniques with considerable successes. Only a limited range of polymers, though, has been used for electrospinning with liquid crystal cores, and the process of electrospinning has many obstacles to its utility at an industrial scale. On the other hand, wet-spinning techniques are better suited for industrial applications and are widely used in textile manufacturing, but are not commonly used for coaxial fiber production, especially with the large experimental scales that are difficult to replicate in a standard liquid crystal research laboratory. We therefore propose a method for wet-spinning coaxial core-sheath liquid crystal-filled elastomer fibers using a microfluidic set-up. Based on the flow-focusing method used for the production of liquid crystal shells and emulsions, this technique generates coaxial filaments by pumping a core-sheath flow of a liquid crystal surrounded by a rubbery polymer solution into a co-flowing coagulation bath. The coagulation bath is tuned to quickly extract the elastic polymer solution solvent, leaving behind a dry, continuous fiber. We have employed this method to produce fibers of polybutadiene and polyisoprene containing a core of a liquid crystal, such as 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl (5CB). Investigations into the choice of polymer solution, i.e. both the polymer and solvents used, will be presented in addition to discussion on parameters affecting the contiguity of the core. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 313 (9 UL)
See detailN point Virasoro algebras are multi-point Krichever Novikov type algebras
Schlichenmaier, Martin UL

Scientific Conference (2019, March 19)

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See detailMaking an Archive-Based Historical Web Documentary
Santana, Dominique UL

Scientific Conference (2019, March 14)

Detailed reference viewed: 84 (3 UL)
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See detailModelling how the relative spatial pattern of green within cities impact carbon flows
Boura, Marlène Delphine Fabienne UL

Scientific Conference (2019, March 14)

Cities - particularly the denser ones - are often depicted as sustainable systems that reduce the consumption of land and optimize energy use for buildings and transport. Cities, however - exactly because ... [more ▼]

Cities - particularly the denser ones - are often depicted as sustainable systems that reduce the consumption of land and optimize energy use for buildings and transport. Cities, however - exactly because they concentrate human activities - constitute the main source of CO2 emissions into the atmosphere. Yet it is important to assess to what extent they can cope with their own emissions. We address this issue by examining how the internal spatial organization of cities can impact the flow of anthropogenic CO2 between their major sources - human activities, mainly on built-up lands - ; and their main storage infrastructures, with a focus here on urban green spaces and forests. Is it better to have a dense core with a peripheric green belt? Large green patches within the core centre? Or small and fragmented green spaces? The objective of the present work is to tests whether the internal spatial organization of cities - in terms of green infrastructure characteristics and land use types - matters for evaluating carbon sequestration potentials of cities. Or whether these cities can simply be considered as single objects with a quantity of carbon emissions and a carbon sink capacity derived directly from aggregated land use data. We model urban carbon flows for about 800 Functional Urban Areas (FUAs) of European cities using the Urban Atlas 2012 database. The model intends to characterize the emissions, their diffusion and sequestration within the urban regions as well as their exit from the analysed urban systems. The FUAs are classified along landscape metrics in order to derive a typology of urban forms focusing on the relative position of green and human activities and their characteristics. The analysis then investigates how the type of urban form can affect the level of efficiency of CO2 uptake. The efficiency is defined as the share of local emissions captured within the urban boundaries. The model will be validated using eddy covariance empirical data. [less ▲]

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See detailUnderstanding Alpha Decay
Penasse, Julien UL

Scientific Conference (2019, March 12)

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See detailUnderstanding Alpha Decay
Penasse, Julien UL

Scientific Conference (2019, March 12)

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See detailCharacterizations and classifications of quasitrivial semigroups
Devillet, Jimmy UL; Marichal, Jean-Luc UL; Teheux, Bruno UL

Scientific Conference (2019, March 03)

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See detailThe Pact with the Devil as Model and Crisis of Complicity (Marlowe, Goethe)
Kohns, Oliver UL

Scientific Conference (2019, March)

Detailed reference viewed: 72 (2 UL)
See detailTrue or False Contradictions between Life Time Contracts and Platform Work Contracts?
Ratti, Luca UL

Scientific Conference (2019, March)

Detailed reference viewed: 97 (3 UL)
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See detailIntergenerational mobility in Europe: Home ownership as a facet of social reproduction?
Chauvel, Louis UL; Hartung, Anne UL

Scientific Conference (2019, March)

Detailed reference viewed: 165 (5 UL)
See detailStudents with emotional and behavioral problems: Their emotional experience in the classroom during peer interactions
Zurbriggen, Carmen UL; Knickenberg, Margarita; Venetz, Martin

Scientific Conference (2019, March)

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See detailOrganiser, European Banking Center (EBC) Network Conference
Wolff, Christian UL

Scientific Conference (2019, March)

Detailed reference viewed: 69 (0 UL)
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See detailSocial Rehire Clauses and Transfer of Undertakings
Ratti, Luca UL

Scientific Conference (2019, March)

Detailed reference viewed: 91 (3 UL)
See detailUsing Agent Based Modelling for describing mobility decisions in pre-urban societies
Sikk, Kaarel UL

Scientific Conference (2019, February 26)

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See detailTransforming Collaboration Data into Network Layers for Enhanced Analytics
Esmaeilzadeh Dilmaghani, Saharnaz UL; Piyatumrong, Apivadee; Bouvry, Pascal UL et al

Scientific Conference (2019, February 25)

We consider the problem of automatically generating networks from data of collaborating researchers. The objective is to apply network analysis on the resulting network layers to reveal supplemental ... [more ▼]

We consider the problem of automatically generating networks from data of collaborating researchers. The objective is to apply network analysis on the resulting network layers to reveal supplemental patterns and insights of the research collaborations. In this paper, we describe our data-to-networks method, which automatically generates a set of logical network layers from the relational input data using a linkage threshold. We, then, use a series of network metrics to analyze the impact of the linkage threshold on the individual network layers. Moreover, results from the network analysis also provide beneficial information to improve the network visualization. We demonstrate the feasibility and impact of our approach using real-world collaboration data. We discuss how the produced network layers can reveal insights and patterns to direct the data analytics more intelligently. [less ▲]

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See detailSubjectivity and Digital Research
Takats, Sean UL

Scientific Conference (2019, February 18)

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See detailThe real problem with Rawlsian reasonableness
Burks, Deven UL

Scientific Conference (2019, February 16)

Rawlsian “reasonableness” has been the object of considerable and varied criticism. Reactions range from its being “loaded” (Stout 2004: 184) or “chimerical” (Young 2005: 308) to “entirely circular” ... [more ▼]

Rawlsian “reasonableness” has been the object of considerable and varied criticism. Reactions range from its being “loaded” (Stout 2004: 184) or “chimerical” (Young 2005: 308) to “entirely circular” (Mulhall and Swift 2003: 483). Yet more critical reactions often employ external standards or equivocal senses of reasonableness to their detriment (Freeman 2004: 2045, 2063-5) or marshal apparently conflicting materials from Rawls’s broader theory (Young 2005, 2006). In this paper, I put forward a narrow, immanent criticism whereon the two basic aspects of reasonableness are shown to be in tension: the “burdens of judgment” may give the person reason to disagree over the need to propose and to abide by a common basis of fair terms of cooperation. My aims in doing so are threefold. First, I try to make sense of and set on firmer ground Stout’s (2004) critique of reasonableness as being epistemologically untenable. My second and third aims stem from the first. The second consists in carving out a middling conceptual space wherein the negation of Rawlsian “reasonableness” is not merely “unreasonable” in the sense of being willing to impose one’s comprehensive doctrine on others as the terms of political justification and coercion (Rawls 1996: 60-1; Freeman 2004: 2049) nor “unreasonable” in the sense of persons’ culpably endorsing a doctrine inconsistent with acceptance of the burdens of judgment (Rawls 2001: 184, 190; Freeman 2004: 2064) but, instead, “reasonably unreasonable” in the sense of the person’s nonculpably or justifiably rejecting the requirement to offer and to abide by fair terms of cooperation in view of the burdens of judgment. Third, I attempt to salvage a minimal core of reasonableness from the two-conjunct Rawlsian reasonableness, a core which contemporary political philosophers are hard-pressed to do without: the second conjunct consisting in the person’s acknowledgement of the burdens of judgment (Rawls 1996: 54-8). To that end, I proceed in two steps. First, I shall recall the two aspects of reasonableness and hold that their conjunction is necessary for a person to qualify as “reasonable”. In particular, this involves showing that a biconditional obtains: a person is reasonable if and only if the two basic aspects of reasonableness obtain, i.e. if and only if she is willing to propose fair terms of cooperation and she is willing to recognize the burdens of judgment. I also briefly define the site wherefrom one checks a person’s reasonableness: the “you and me” standpoint (Rawls 1996: 28). Secondly, I shall examine whether any burden gives reason to doubt the need to propose and to abide by a common basis of fair terms of cooperation. I find that each of the burdens, in its own way, leaves room to doubt whether reasonable persons in a well-ordered society would assent to such a need. For the first burden (complexity of evidence), the evidence backing the requirement of shared terms of cooperation defined ex ante is not obviously less complex than that contained in reasonable comprehensive doctrines. Regarding the second (relative weight of reasons), even supposing agreement on which reasons are relevant to deciding questions of justice, there may be still be disagreement over the relative priority of those reasons in deciding a given question. As to the third (conceptual indeterminacy and hard cases), such concepts as justice and fairness, cooperation and equality are all subject to the difficulties of identifying hard cases and probing a concept’s limits. Of the fourth (divergent total life experience), it is clear that, through her life experience, a person acquires a set of beliefs (political, moral, epistemological, religious, etc.) which could give the person reason to doubt or otherwise reject the first basic aspect of reasonableness, especially given its significant complexity. Finally, for the fifth burden (conflicting distinct normative considerations), persons may disagree over whether the first basic aspect in fact realizes these different considerations, the priority ordering to be fixed for such considerations and whether a common currency might be found so as to make such considerations commensurable, any of which may suffice for persons to be unable to reach agreement on the requirement, not simply on the reasons why it holds, but also on whether it holds at all. In reaching these findings, I parallel Clarke’s (1999: 639-41) claim that the burdens of judgment apply both to contractarianism’s “reasonable rejection procedure” and principles but do so from narrower, immanent grounds rather than the stronger claim that Rawls’s approach must be committed to substantive epistemological positions. This analysis yields two striking conclusions: First, public reason – the demand to present others with reasons which the person could reasonably expect them to accept – becomes looser and shifts to the domain of politics where one sees what public reasons others may in fact accept (Laden 2001). Seen from a different angle, one need not accept the idea that the first basic aspect and, hence, Rawlsian reasonableness are necessary conditions of political justification under conditions of reasonable pluralism (contra Krasnoff 2014: 696-7): rejecting this aspect and reasonableness in no way means that there can be no political justification under conditions of (reasonable) pluralism. Second, when conceiving justification and discourse, Rawls may be committed, despite himself, to accepting “reasonableness pluralism”, i.e. the view that there exist distinct, possibly irreconcilable accounts of reasonableness to which one may appeal when conceiving justification and discourse. Their combination may lead to a public reason liberalism framework which is at once looser and more actionable. [less ▲]

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See detailUnderstanding Alpha Decay
Penasse, Julien UL

Scientific Conference (2019, February 04)

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See detailDer "March for Science" – eine Initiative für die Freiheit der Wissenschaft
Baudson, Tanja Gabriele UL

Scientific Conference (2019, February 01)

Der ›March for Science‹ ist eine international angelegte Großdemonstration, die sich für Wissenschaftsfreiheit und gegen ›alternative Fakten‹ ausspricht. Sie findet seit 2017 in mehr als 600 Städten ... [more ▼]

Der ›March for Science‹ ist eine international angelegte Großdemonstration, die sich für Wissenschaftsfreiheit und gegen ›alternative Fakten‹ ausspricht. Sie findet seit 2017 in mehr als 600 Städten weltweit statt. Im Rahmen eines Symposiums soll es um diese Initiative und das Thema ›Wissenschaft im politischen Meinungsstreit‹ gehen. [less ▲]

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See detailTeachers´ Attitudes toward Students with High- and Low-Educated Parents
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Glock, Sabine UL

Scientific Conference (2019, February)

Background In several countries, school tracking is used to group students with similar academic potential to optimize instruction. Teachers often have a more or less deciding vote, which school track ... [more ▼]

Background In several countries, school tracking is used to group students with similar academic potential to optimize instruction. Teachers often have a more or less deciding vote, which school track would suit different students based on academic achievement and potential (Ansalone and Biafora, 2004). Given the differential qualifications associated with completion of the different school tracks, teachers’ abilities to correctly assign students to different tracks will not only affect the students´ educational pathways, but also has a long lasting effect on career opportunities and general wellbeing in future adult life. Research shows that tracking recommendations mainly rely on students’ abilities (e.g., Caro, et al., 2009; Klapproth, et al., 2013; Marks, 2006). However, non-academic related student characteristics such as the socioeconomic status (SES) of the parents and —closely related (Reardon, 2011)—the parental educational level also affect teachers´ tracking decisions, either indirectly via grades or directly via the tracking decision itself (Bauer and Riphahn, 2006; Caro et al., 2009; de Boer, et al., 2010; Ditton, Krüsken, and Schauenberg, 2005; Maaz, et al., 2008; Timmermans, et al., 2015; Wagner, et al., 2009). Indeed, research has provided evidence for such stereotype bias in teachers’ judgments, leading to disadvantages for certain social groups (Peterson, et al., 2016; van den Bergh, et al., 2010). Hence, the aim of our study was the investigation of teachers’ attitudes toward students in relation to the educational level of parents. Method The aim of the current study was to investigate teachers´ implicit and explicit attitudes toward students with differentially educated parents. Implicit attitudes were measured using an implicit association task (IAT). The first name of the student was used as a proxy for the educational level of parents (see Onland & Bloothooft, 2008), whereby we created separate versions for boys and girls. Participating teachers (N=70) were randomly divided in two groups whereby the first group completed the IAT-boys version and the other group the IAT-girls version. Explicit attitudes were measured using a questionnaire (adapted from Glock, et al., 2016). Results: Participants indicated positive implicit attitudes toward students with highly educated parents, independent of the gender of the student. More specifically, an independent t test revealed that the mean IAT-D scores for boys and girls did not differ, t(68)=0.47, p=.64, d=0.12. The IAT-D score for the whole sample (M=0.81, SD=0.61) was significantly different from zero, t(69)=11.14, p<.001, d=1.33, reflecting more positive implicit attitudes toward highly educated parents. Teachers did not express differential explicit beliefs regarding the learning and social behaviors of students based on the educational level of the parents (i.e., subscale scores were significantly lower than the mean of the scale, t(65)=4.26, p<.001, d=0.53), whereas their expectations concerning the motivation and ambitions or educational chances of these students were neutral. Although the three subscales within the explicit attitudes measure were substantially associated (correlations ranging from r = .39 to r =.74), no association between explicit and implicit attitudes measures was found (correlations range from r = -.07 to r = .08). Conclusion: Teachers’ attitudes seem to be an important factor, which can guide teachers´ judgments and behaviors, and could partly explain differences in educational equity for students with similar academic profiles, but differentially educated parents. The positive implicit attitudes in favor of students with highly educated parents imply more favorable judgments for and behavior toward these students and deeper work is required to ensure teachers’ fair treatment of all students. The dissociation between implicit and explicit attitudes may be an indication of the social sensitivity of the relationship between students´ social background and educational achievements and opportunities. [less ▲]

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See detailInklusion aus der Sicht von Kindern mit dem Förderschwerpunkt Lernen – Überprüfung von Messinvarianz in verschiedenen schulischen Kontexten
Knickenberg, Margarita; Zurbriggen, Carmen UL; Venetz, Martin

Scientific Conference (2019, February)

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See detailCan Rawlsians be constitutional deliberative democrats?
Burks, Deven UL

Scientific Conference (2019, January 31)

Most see Rawls as a “constitutionalist” rather than a “proceduralist”. He insists that the basic schedule of freedoms, rights and governing procedures, once established, be removed from the table of ... [more ▼]

Most see Rawls as a “constitutionalist” rather than a “proceduralist”. He insists that the basic schedule of freedoms, rights and governing procedures, once established, be removed from the table of governmental and democratic decision-making. Pragmatically, that schedule must be fixed to avoid majoritarian domination, acrimonious bargaining and gridlock and to realize the stabilizing effect of a permanent public set of institutional arrangements and values. Morally, one must affirm only those institutional principles which one would choose in perpetuity, for past, present and future generations. Accordingly, Rawlsians might wonder what good can come of constitutional deliberative democracy, i.e. enabling citizens to formulate and modify the constitution, potentially undermining its stability? Though a necessary element of any just political order and a great political good, stability is only such when stable institutions are also just and guarantee the “fair value of political liberty”, namely that “citizens similarly gifted and motivated have roughly an equal chance of influencing the government’s policy and of attaining positions of authority irrespective of their economic and social class” (Rawls 2005: 358). Formal equality is no replacement for effective equality. Despite lamenting that “one of the main defects of constitutional government has been the failure to insure the fair value of political liberty” (Rawls 1999: 198), Rawls’s institutional vision remains largely within familiar representative and electoral logics. His threefold view of deliberative democracy is similarly limited: an idea of public reason, an institutional framework including a deliberative legislature, and public uptake of the public reason idea(l) (Rawls 2005: 448). Accordingly, I argue that Rawls and his “fair value guarantee” are better served by promoting both freestanding and embedded citizen deliberation on constitutional arrangements. This vehicle for the fair value guarantee is more easily attainable than the transition to a his preferred alternative for political economy, “property-owning democracy” (Rawls 2001: §41) and may fulfill similar aims. Finally, I review two remaining objections from Rawlsians concerning compelled participation and institutional pluralism. All in all, given Rawls’s prominence in political theory, showing that Rawlsians can be constitutional deliberative democrats may help bring another piece to the constitutional deliberative democratic coalition. [less ▲]

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See detailGeneralizations of single-peakedness
Devillet, Jimmy UL

Scientific Conference (2019, January 30)

We establish a surprising connection between a family of conservative semigroups, which includes the class of idempotent uninorms, and the concepts of single-peakedness and single-plateaudness, introduced ... [more ▼]

We establish a surprising connection between a family of conservative semigroups, which includes the class of idempotent uninorms, and the concepts of single-peakedness and single-plateaudness, introduced in social choice theory by D. Black. We also introduce a generalization of single-peakedness to partial orders of join-semilattices and show how it is related to the class of idempotent and commutative semigroups. Finally, we enumerate those orders when the corresponding semigroups are finite. [less ▲]

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See detailGP hyper-heuristic for the travelling salesman problem
Duflo, Gabriel UL; Kieffer, Emmanuel UL; Danoy, Grégoire UL et al

Scientific Conference (2019, January 29)

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See detail"A Colônia Luxemburguesa" – Trajectories made of Steel
Santana, Dominique UL

Scientific Conference (2019, January 25)

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See detailIslamic Finance and Economic Growth: New Evidence
Lehnert, Thorsten UL

Scientific Conference (2019, January 24)

While extensive work has shown that conventional banking development is generally conducive to economic growth, there are only a limited number of studies that investigate the impact of Islamic banking ... [more ▼]

While extensive work has shown that conventional banking development is generally conducive to economic growth, there are only a limited number of studies that investigate the impact of Islamic banking. Importantly, the literature on conventional banking claims that a reverse causality from economy performance to banking may exists, but existing studies on Islamic banking fail to address this potential endogeneity problem. This paper tackles this problem and explores the relationship between Islamic banking development and economic performance in a sample of 32 developed and developing countries based on data spanning the 2000 to 2016 period. The findings show that, although Islamic banks are considered small relative to the total size of the financial sector, Islamic banking is positively correlated with economic growth even after controlling for financial structure, macroeconomic factors and other variables. The outcome is robust across different econometric specifications like pooling OLS, fixed effects, panel data with over-identified GMM, and dynamic difference GMM. The results are confirmed on two different indicators of Islamic banking and hold for different time periods. [less ▲]

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See detailMagnetic and free-layer properties of MgO/(Co)FeB/MgO structure: Dependence on CoFeB composition
Bersweiler, Mathias UL

Scientific Conference (2019, January 17)

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See detailComment assurer la qualité de l’évaluation par les pairs des propositions de communication dans le cadre d’un colloque scientifique ?
Milmeister, Marianne UL; Weis, Christiane UL; Dierendonck, Christophe UL

Scientific Conference (2019, January 10)

L’évaluation par les pairs joue un rôle important dans le monde universitaire et est souvent considérée comme le garant de la qualité scientifique. En même temps, les biais qui existent pour ce type ... [more ▼]

L’évaluation par les pairs joue un rôle important dans le monde universitaire et est souvent considérée comme le garant de la qualité scientifique. En même temps, les biais qui existent pour ce type d’évaluation sont multiples (partialité des évaluateurs, divergence de jugement entre évaluateurs, etc.) et bien documentés dans la littérature. Dans le cadre d’un colloque que nous avons organisé en 2018, nous avons mené une analyse exploratoire sur la base de données des évaluations réalisées par les pairs. Le but était d’avoir une idée de la qualité de l’évaluation par les pairs, de voir dans quelle mesure on retrouve les biais relevés par la littérature scientifique et, enfin, de définir des pistes qui pourraient contribuer à améliorer la qualité de ce processus. Dans le cas de notre colloque, l’évaluation par les pairs s’est faite via une plateforme en ligne. Chaque proposition de communication était évaluée de manière anonyme par deux personnes et sur base de neuf critères pour lesquels les évaluateurs pouvaient choisir entre quatre modalités d’appréciation : très faible, faible, bon, très bon. Ensuite, l’évaluateur devait donner sa recommandation pour la contribution analysée : acceptation, acceptation sous réserve d’ajustements ou refus. Une première analyse des données montre notamment qu’il existe des différences plus ou moins importantes tant entre les jugements des évaluateurs qu’entre les décisions d’un même évaluateur. Les résultats détaillés de nos analyses seront présentés lors du colloque et des pistes d’amélioration discutées. [less ▲]

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See detailMixed hybrid and electric bus dynamic fleet management in urban networks: a model predictive control approach
Rinaldi, Marco UL; Picarelli, Erika; Laskaris, Georgios UL et al

Scientific Conference (2019, January)

Reducing pollutant emissions and promoting sustainable mobility solutions, including Public Transport, are increasingly becoming key objectives for policymakers worldwide. In order to jointly achieve ... [more ▼]

Reducing pollutant emissions and promoting sustainable mobility solutions, including Public Transport, are increasingly becoming key objectives for policymakers worldwide. In order to jointly achieve these goals, careful consideration should be put on the operational cost and management of PT services, in order to promote the adoption of green mobility solutions and advanced management techniques by operators. In this work we develop a dynamic fleet management approach for next generation Public Transportation systems, considering the instance of mixed electric / hybrid fleet. Our objective is that of investigating to what extent electrification, coupled with optimal fleet management, can yield operational cost savings for PT operators, explicitly considering real-time disturbances, including delays, service disruptions etc. We propose a Mixed Integer Linear Program to address the problem of optimal scheduling of a mixed fleet of electric and hybrid / non-electric buses, and employ it as predictor in a Model Predictive Control approach. Test results based upon a real-life scenario showcase how the proposed approach is indeed capable of yielding a sizable reduction in operational costs, even when considerable disturbances arise from the underlying system. [less ▲]

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See detailKomparatistik als Praxis der Freiheit (Hans-Jost Frey, Werner Hamacher)
Kohns, Oliver UL

Scientific Conference (2019, January)

Detailed reference viewed: 129 (1 UL)
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See detailGender differences with regard to physical activity motivation and behavior in physical education and leisure time
Hutmacher, Djenna UL; Eckelt, Melanie UL; Bund, Andreas UL et al

Scientific Conference (2019, January)

Objectives: Given a widespread continuous decrease in children’s and adoles-cents’ physical activity (PA), the potential of physical education (PE) in promoting young people’s PA motivation and behavior ... [more ▼]

Objectives: Given a widespread continuous decrease in children’s and adoles-cents’ physical activity (PA), the potential of physical education (PE) in promoting young people’s PA motivation and behavior has become a key issue in research. Based on the self-determination theory (SDT) of Deci and Ryan (1985), the present study aimed to ex-amine gender differences with regard to PA motivation and behavior during PE and lei-sure time (LT). Previously, girls were found to be more self-determined than boys (Wil-liams & Deci, 1996), but showed lower self-reported PA and were meeting the PA guide-lines of the WHO to a lesser extent (Trost et al., 2002). Method: 244 students (139 girls and 125 boys) from 11 to 21 years participated in the study. PA motivation was assessed via a digital questionnaire containing the scales need support (Standage, Duda and Ntoumanis, 2005), basic needs (BPNES; Vlachopou-los, Ntoumanis & Smith, 2010), external and intrinsic motivation in PE (PLOC-R; Vla-chopoulos et al., 2011) and in LT (BREQ-II; Markland & Tobin, 2004). PA behavior was measured through a self-report questionnaire (Schmidt, Will, Henn, Reimers & Woll, 2016). Additionally, 76 students (38 girls and 38 boys) wore an accelerometer (ActiGraph GT3X-BT) over seven consecutive days to measure PA behavior objectively, too. Results: With regard to PA motivation, girls reported a lower fulfillment in the basic need of competence during PE and scored higher in the external motivation during PE and LT than boys. In contrast, boys reported higher rates of intrinsic motivation during PE and LT. Concerning PA behavior, boys showed higher PA than girls for self-reported and objectively measured PA in PE and LT. Independently of gender, higher levels of intrinsic motivation were associated with increased self-reported PA. Discussion: In conflict with previous findings, girls reported a lower intrinsic motiva-tion in PA than boys. As girls simultaneously show lower self-reported and objectively measured PA, future intervention programs should focus on strengthening the more in-ternally driven behavior of girls in order to foster regular PA. Key Reference: Deci, E.L. & Ran, R.M. (1985). Intrinsic motivation and self-determination in human behav-ior. New York: Plenum Press. [less ▲]

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See detailSystematic monitoring by passive samplers on WWTPs provides new insights in micropollutant elimination, related process parameters and degradation pathways
Köhler, Christian; Gallé, Tom; Pittois, Denis et al

Scientific Conference (2019)

Detailed reference viewed: 68 (6 UL)
See detail(In)visibility: Negotiating Difference in Luxembourgish Schools
Badder, Anastasia UL

Scientific Conference (2019)

Detailed reference viewed: 13 (0 UL)
See detailRevealing moment correlations within nanoparticle clusters
Bender, Philipp Florian UL

Scientific Conference (2019)

Detailed reference viewed: 57 (9 UL)
See detailMesa Redonda: 2018 - Año de elecciones: Brasil, Colombia y México/ 2018
Harnoncourt, Julia UL; Molden, Berthold; Echivarria, Josefina

Scientific Conference (2019)

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (0 UL)
See detailIdentifying Small Molecules in Untargeted Exposomics Data: A case study of Thirdhand Smoke
Schymanski, Emma UL; Torres, Sonia; Ramirez, Noelia

Scientific Conference (2019)

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (1 UL)
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See detailAutomation, Growth, and Factor Shares in the Era of Population Aging
Irmen, Andreas UL

Scientific Conference (2019)

How does population aging affect factor shares and economic growth in times of declining investment good prices and increasingly automated production processes? The present paper addresses this question ... [more ▼]

How does population aging affect factor shares and economic growth in times of declining investment good prices and increasingly automated production processes? The present paper addresses this question in a new model of automation where competitive firms perform tasks to produce output. Tasks require labor and machines as inputs. New machines embody superior technological knowledge and substitute for labor in the performance of tasks. The incentive to automate is stronger when the expected wage is higher or when the price of an automation investment is lower. Automation is shown to i) boost the aggregate demand for labor if the incentives to automate are strong enough and ii) reduce the labor share. These predictions obtain even though automation is labor-augmenting in the economy’s reduced-form production function. In the short run, population aging weakens the incentives to automate and increases the labor share as individuals augment their labor supply. These implications may be neutralized if, at the same time, the price of investment goods declines. In the log-run, population aging and a lower price of investment goods are reinforcing. Both imply more automation, a lower labor share, and faster economic growth. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 47 (2 UL)
See detailAnalyzing moment correlations within clusters of magnetic nanoparticles
Bender, Philipp Florian UL

Scientific Conference (2019)

Detailed reference viewed: 54 (6 UL)
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See detailLink budget analysis for satellite-based narrowband IoT systems
Kodheli, Oltjon UL; Maturo, Nicola UL; Andrenacci, Stefano et al

Scientific Conference (2019)

Detailed reference viewed: 313 (52 UL)
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See detailFemmes et écrivaines : éternelles mineures ?
Barthelmebs-Raguin, Hélène UL

Scientific Conference (2019)

Detailed reference viewed: 38 (1 UL)
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See detailWartung und Reparatur als Teil der automobilen Konsumgeschichte, 1920-1980
Krebs, Stefan UL

Scientific Conference (2019)

Detailed reference viewed: 32 (0 UL)
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See detailThe Development of Repair Businesses in Esch-sur-Alzette
Krebs, Stefan UL

Scientific Conference (2019)

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (1 UL)
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See detailLa monstruosité maternelle dans l’œuvre d’Anne Hébert
Barthelmebs-Raguin, Hélène UL

Scientific Conference (2019)

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (1 UL)
See detailÜberlegungen zur Experimentellen Medienarchäologie
Krebs, Stefan UL

Scientific Conference (2019)

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (2 UL)
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See detailMental health benefits of a robot-mediated emotional ability training for children with autism: An exploratory study.
Pinto Costa, Andreia UL; Kirsten, Lena; Charpiot, Louise UL et al

Scientific Conference (2019)

Background: Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) have a high prevalence of mental health problems that are linked to reduced emotional abilities. Therefore, interventions that teach emotional ... [more ▼]

Background: Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) have a high prevalence of mental health problems that are linked to reduced emotional abilities. Therefore, interventions that teach emotional abilities are fundamental for their development. However, existing interventions are costly, of difficult access, or inefficient for children with ASD. Furthermore, children with ASD have a preference for sameness and routines that makes technology, and especially robots, an ideal medium to convey interventions that are suitable to their needs. Objectives: The aim of the present exploratory study is to evaluate whether a robot-mediated emotional ability training is effective in enhancing the emotional ability and the mental health of children with ASD. Methods: Using a pre-post training design, 12 children with ASD (all boys) aged between 8 and 14 years (M = 10.93; SD = 2.46) undertook a 7 week long emotional ability training mediated by a robot. Sessions took place weekly and lasted 1h each. Children were compared before (T1) and after (T2) the training on their emotional ability and their mental health. Emotional ability was measured through the parent-report measures Emotion Regulation Checklist (ERC; Shields & Cicchetti, 1997), Emotion Regulation Rating Scale (ERRS; Carlson & Wang, 2007), Self-Control Rating Scale (SCRS; Kendall & Wilcox, 1979), and the Alexithymia Questionnaire for Children (Rieffe et al., 2006); as well through a direct measure of children’s use of emotion regulation strategies using the Reactive and Regulation Situation Tasks (Carthy et al., 2010). Mental health was measured through the parent-report measures Children Behavior Checklist (CBCL; Achenbach & Rescorla, 2001), Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ; Goodman, 1997), and the Social Responsiveness Scale-2 (SRS-2; Constantino, 2002). Results: It was found that regarding emotional ability, children’s use of emotion regulation strategies in the Reactive and Regulation Situation Task, improved significantly after the training (t(10) = 2.81, p < .01) but no significant improvements were found on the parent-reported measures (ERC: t(10) = 0.43, p = .34; SCRS: t(10) = 1.26, p = .12), except for a marginally significant effect on children’s emotional control (ERRS: t(10) = 1.79, p = .05). Regarding mental health, the training significantly reduced internalizing problems (CBCL: t(11) = 1.91, p < .05; SDQ: t(11) = 3.19, p < .01) and autism-related symptomatology (SRS-2: t(11) = 3.24, p < .01), but did not have an effect on externalizing problems (CBCL: t(11) = 0.41, p = 34; SDQ: t(11) = 3.13, p = 07). Discussion: Overall, the results of the present study are to be interpreted cautiously, they provide restricted evidence of positive effects of the robot-mediated emotional ability training in children’s use of adaptive emotional abilities and in mental health issues such as depressive symptomatology and anxiety as well as autism-related social communication difficulties. This exploratory study contributes to the research progress in the domain of robot-mediated interventions for children with ASD. [less ▲]

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See detailAsylum seekers and refugees’ lived experiences of borders and (im)mobility. The Case of Luxembourg
Paraschivescu, Claudia UL; Oesch, Lucas UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Scientific Conference (2019)

The mobility of people influences the (re)creation of borders through bordering practices. Conversely, borders and bordering practices affect the management of mobility and thus peoples’ migratory ... [more ▼]

The mobility of people influences the (re)creation of borders through bordering practices. Conversely, borders and bordering practices affect the management of mobility and thus peoples’ migratory trajectories. Based on in-depth qualitative interviews with refugees conducted for the H2020 project CEASEVAL, this paper explores the ways in which borders at various levels (spatial, legal, economic and social) influence migrants’ mobility before, during and after arrival in Luxembourg. As such, by focusing on the interrelations between border studies and mobility studies, it brings together two fields which have rarely been studied together, particularly when focused on refugees. This is of particular interest both empirically (given the multiple flows of people arriving in Luxembourg) and conceptually (as bordering practices relate to both practices of mobility and border making, as well as border crossing, from an institutional and experiential perspective). With 2,322 asylum applications in 2017, the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg is home to one asylum application per 254 people. This is far more that the EU-28 average, which is one application for every 787 people. Despite this, academic research depicting the everyday experiences of refugees in Luxembourg is lacking. This paper will first provide an overview of the Luxembourgish context with regards to asylum seekers and refugees. It will then analyse how bordering practices are experienced when carried out by traditional actors such as border agents. Lastly, it will shed light on the participants’ everyday experiences of borders by (non) traditional actors, such as ‘citizens’ and housing/labour market agents. It seeks to explore the ways in which the Luxembourgish politics of belonging influence the respondents’ feelings of belonging, which can further affect their (im)mobilities. [less ▲]

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See detailEvaluation of global ocean tide models based on tidal gravity observations in China
Tan, H.; Francis, Olivier UL; Shen, C. et al

Scientific Conference (2019)

Solid Earth is affected by tidal cycles triggered by the gravity attraction of the celestial bodies. However, about 70% the Earth is covered with seawater which is also affected by the tidal forces. In ... [more ▼]

Solid Earth is affected by tidal cycles triggered by the gravity attraction of the celestial bodies. However, about 70% the Earth is covered with seawater which is also affected by the tidal forces. In the coastal areas, the ocean tidal loading (OTL) can reach up to 10% of the earth tide, 90% for tilt, and 25% for strain (Farrell, 1972). Since 2007, a high-precision continuous gravity observation network in China has been established with 78 stations. The long-term high-precision tidal data of the network can be used to validate, verifying and even improve the ocean tidal model (OTM). In this paper, tidal parameters of each station were extracted using the harmonic analysis method after a careful editing of the data. 8 OTMs were used for calculating the OTL. The results show that the Root-Mean-Square of the tidal residuals (M0) vary between 0.078-1.77 μgal, and the average errors as function of the distance from the sea for near(0-60km), middle(60-1000km) and far(>1000km) stations are 0.76, 0.30 and 0.21 μgal. The total final gravity residuals (Tx) of the 8 major constituents (M2, S2, N2, K2, K1, O1, P1, Q1) for the best OTM has amplitude ranging from 0.14 to 3.45 μgal. The average efficiency for O1 is 77.0%, while 73.1%, 59.6% and 62.6% for K1, M2 and Tx. FES2014b provides the best corrections for O1 at 12 stations, while SCHW provides the best for K1 ,M2 and Tx at 12 , 8 and 9 stations. For the 11 costal stations, there is not an obvious best OTM. The models of DTU10, EOT11a and TPXO8 look a litter better than FES2014b, HAMTIDE and SCHW. For the 17 middle distance stations, SCHW is the best OTM obviously. For the 7 far distance stations, FES2014b and SCHW model are the best models. But the correction efficiency is worse than the near and middle stations'. The outcome is mixed: none of the recent OTMs performs the best for all tidal waves at all stations. Surprisingly, the Schwiderski's model although is 40 years old with a coarse resolution of 1° x 1° is performing relative well with respect to the more recent OTM. Similar results are obtained in Southeast Asia (Francis and van Dam, 2014). It could be due to systematic errors in the surroundings seas affecting all the ocean tides models. It's difficult to detect, but invert the gravity attraction and loading effect to map the ocean tides in the vicinity of China would be one way. [less ▲]

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See detailNegotiating the past, present, and future: The Luxembourgish Jewish Museum Project as a Process of Contested memory and imagined futures
Badder, Anastasia UL; Bronec, Jakub UL

Scientific Conference (2019)

There is currently a project underway to establish a Jewish museum in Luxembourg in a restored synagogue just outside the main city center. As this project unfolds, it provides a clear view into the ... [more ▼]

There is currently a project underway to establish a Jewish museum in Luxembourg in a restored synagogue just outside the main city center. As this project unfolds, it provides a clear view into the contestations and negotiations over meaning, representation, Jewishness, and the past, present, and future visions of community that arise in the development of a museum. Ongoing debates over which objects will be included in the museum, how they will be defined, how they will link to other sites of Jewish heritage around the city (through tours, performances, reference, etc.), as well as a hesitancy by many to donate family objects all point to issues around the construction of collective memory, communal cultural heritage, and multiple narratives of the past and how these are erased in the process of producing heritage as a series of museum objects. These debates also highlight concerns about how the contemporary community – which is multilingual, multinational, and multi-denominational – will be represented; in other words, who will be included in representations of the community and how will the contemporary community be defined, if at all? Finally, ongoing discussions around what will be emphasized or downplayed indicate the contested nature, not only of the past, but also of collective visions of the future as constituted through representations of heritage. In particular, negotiations over how to represent the Holocaust reflect a desire by some to fit the museum into developing narratives of cosmopolitanism, interfaith, and intercultural relations and a drive by others to represent family narratives and engage in a project ‘against forgetting’ in order to ensure a particular kind of future. And so, using this project as a case study, I seek to draw attention to the ways in which the construction of a heritage regime is at once a negotiation over narratives of the past, shared present identities, and collective visions of the future and the discourses and social processes at work within these debates. [less ▲]

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See detailNS-Zwangsarbeit im Raum Aachen
Krebs, Stefan UL

Scientific Conference (2019)

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See detailSuicidality in adults with autism spectrum disorder: The role of depression and alexithymia.
Pinto Costa, Andreia UL; Loor, Cathia; Steffgen, Georges UL

Scientific Conference (2019)

Background: Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have a higher risk of depression and suicidality than individuals without ASD. Alexithymia, a personality construct characterized by a lack of ... [more ▼]

Background: Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have a higher risk of depression and suicidality than individuals without ASD. Alexithymia, a personality construct characterized by a lack of emotional awareness, that is highly linked to depression, is also more prevalent among people with ASD than in the general population. Few studies have so far examined the increased risk of suicidality in people with ASD and none have looked into how alexithymia could be a significant risk factor for suicidality in ASD. Objectives: The aim of the present study is to explore more closely the relationship between alexithymia, depression, and suicidality in ASD. It is hypothesized that there are higher rates of depression, suicidality, and alexithymia in people with ASD compared to neurotypical adults. Because the risk of suicidality can be explained by high levels of depression and alexithymia in the general population, this is also hypothesized for the group of people with ASD. Methods: In the present study, 53 adults diagnosed with ASD and a control group of 132 adults without ASD were compared on their self-reported scores on autistic traits (AQ-short), depression (CES-D), suicidality (SBQ-R), and alexithymia (TAS-20). Participants were aged between 18 and 60 years. The ASD group was significantly older (M = 33.75; SD = 11.02) than the control group (M = 29.08; SD = 8.74), t(183) = -3.04, p < .01 and there were significantly more men than women in the ASD group (21 men, 31 women, 1 other) than in the control group (31 men, 101 women), χ2(2) = 7.72, p < .05. Results: The results revealed that the ASD group had significantly higher levels of autistic traits [F(1, 181) = 394.61, p < .001, ɳp2 = .69], depression [F(1, 181) = 51.86, p < .001, ɳp2 = .22], suicidality [F(1, 181) = 71.51, p < .001, ɳp2 = .28], and alexithymia [F(1,181) = 143.44, p < .001, ɳp2 = .44] than the control group. A hierarchical linear regression analysis including age, gender, autistic traits, depressive symptomatology, and alexithymia also revealed that the severity of autistic traits and depressive symptomatology were significant predictors of suicidality (autistic traits: β = 1.24, p <.001; depression: β = 1.30, p <.001). Furthermore, alexithymia played a moderating role in the relation between autistic traits and suicidality: a significant relation was found between autistic traits and suicidality on participants with high levels of alexithymia [b = 1.61, SE = 0.31, p < .001], but autistic traits were not related to suicidality on participants with low levels of alexithymia [b = -0.54, SE = .45, p = .24]. Conclusions: The present results show that individuals with ASD are vulnerable to suicidal ideation and that the severity of autistic traits, depression, and alexithymia are important factors in the occurrence of suicidal ideation in ASD. Because of the high risk of suicidality in ASD, interventions that take into consideration depression, and particularly alexithymia, could potentially benefit people with ASD. [less ▲]

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See detailIdentification of optimal process parameters in selective laser sintering
Kabore, Brice Wendlassida UL; Estupinan Donoso, Alvaro Antonio UL; Peters, Bernhard UL et al

Scientific Conference (2019)

Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) is an efficient method for manufacturing complex geometries with high strength and durability. The SLS process subjects a powder bed to thermal cycles allowing theparticles ... [more ▼]

Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) is an efficient method for manufacturing complex geometries with high strength and durability. The SLS process subjects a powder bed to thermal cycles allowing theparticles to coalesce into a solid part without being completely melted. The thermal cycles along withthe thermo-mechanical properties of the powder dictate the properties of the manufactured part.Choosing optimal parameters that lead to functional parts with the desired stiffness, density andstrength requires extensive testing. Microscales models such that Molecular dynamics and DiscreteParticles offer great flexibilities and capacity to reproduce the SLS process from the physical point ofview [1].This study presents a multi-physical model based on the Extended Discrete Element Method forsimulating the thermodynamics and thermo-mechanics that take place in the SLS process as well asthe microstructure evolution of the part. A thermo-viscoelastic constitutive model for discreteparticles is coupled with heat transfer, sintering and fracture to predict.A genetic algorithm is employed to identify optimal process parameters, namely laser power,scanning speed, preheating temperature and layer thickness in an automated iterative process. Theseparameters are identified so that the density and strength of the cooled part meet the target values. [less ▲]

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See detailAssessment of the production of biodiesel from urban wastewater-derived lipids
Frkova, Zuzana UL; Herr, Patrick; Venditti, Silvia UL et al

Scientific Conference (2019)

By adopting a Circular Economy Package in 2015, European Commission aimed at stimulating transition towards a stronger and more circular economy where waste (including sewage) is no longer recognized as ... [more ▼]

By adopting a Circular Economy Package in 2015, European Commission aimed at stimulating transition towards a stronger and more circular economy where waste (including sewage) is no longer recognized as waste, but as a valuable resource of raw materials. This review study assesses the existing methodologies to produce biodiesel from wastewater-derived lipids. Depending on the stage of wastewater treatment where biodiesel would be extracted, it may cover up to 20% of the current European biodiesel demand. Further studies in regards to the biodiesel quality, legislative conditions and techno-economic assessment towards respective transition are needed. [less ▲]

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See detailTaking Stock of the Bologna Process at 20: The Possibilities and Limits of Soft Law Governance
Harmsen, Robert UL; Deca, Ligia

Scientific Conference (2019)

The Bologna Process stands as both an exemplar of regional cooperation in the higher education policy sector and as a comparatively successful instance of the use of so-called ‘soft law governance’ policy ... [more ▼]

The Bologna Process stands as both an exemplar of regional cooperation in the higher education policy sector and as a comparatively successful instance of the use of so-called ‘soft law governance’ policy instruments. Yet, as this pan-European process now marks two decades of existence, questions are increasingly being posed as to its direction and purpose. Against this background, the present paper seeks to take stock of Bologna as it enters adulthood, drawing on both the substantial body of scholarship that has emerged on the process and practitioner insights to examine its past achievements and current challenges. The paper specifically focuses on recent debates surrounding the (non-)implementation of key commitments; on the functioning of the EHEA as a policy forum in relation to both its own membership and the wider international higher education policy landscape; and on the manner in which the EHEA may respond to increasingly serious challenges to the fundamental values that underpin the process. An overall balance sheet is finally drawn, suggesting the likely direction(s) of the process going forward. [less ▲]

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See detailGeometrical and material uncertainties for the mechanics of composites
Barbosa, Joaquim; Bordas, Stéphane UL; Carvalho, Andre et al

Scientific Conference (2019)

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See detailAutomation, Growth, and Factor Shares in the Era of Population Aging
Irmen, Andreas UL

Scientific Conference (2019)

How does population aging affect factor shares and economic growth in times of declining investment good prices and increasingly automated production processes? The present paper addresses this question ... [more ▼]

How does population aging affect factor shares and economic growth in times of declining investment good prices and increasingly automated production processes? The present paper addresses this question in a new model of automation where competitive firms perform tasks to produce output. Tasks require labor and machines as inputs. New machines embody superior technological knowledge and substitute for labor in the performance of tasks. The incentive to automate is stronger when the expected wage is higher or when the price of an automation investment is lower. Automation is shown to i) boost the aggregate demand for labor if the incentives to automate are strong enough and ii) reduce the labor share. These predictions obtain even though automation is labor-augmenting in the economy’s reduced-form production function. In the short run, population aging weakens the incentives to automate and increases the labor share as individuals augment their labor supply. These implications may be neutralized if, at the same time, the price of investment goods declines. In the log-run, population aging and a lower price of investment goods are reinforcing. Both imply more automation, a lower labor share, and faster economic growth. [less ▲]

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See detailLaser welding of polyamide-6.6 and titanium: a chemical bonding story
Hirchenhahn, Pierre; Al Sayyad, Adham UL; Bardon, Julien et al

Scientific Conference (2019)

Hybrid materials are more and more common in biomedical applications, such as implants. However, assembling the materials is still challenging. Mechanical fastening solutions present durability problems ... [more ▼]

Hybrid materials are more and more common in biomedical applications, such as implants. However, assembling the materials is still challenging. Mechanical fastening solutions present durability problems, and adhesive solutions rarely combine strong mechanical properties and biocompatibility. To address these difficulties laser welding is a promising solution. It is a fast process with great design freedom that requires no additional material at the interface. Since the process is quite recent, the involved fundamental mechanism are not well understood. Hence this work aims at exploring the existence of a chemical bond between two materials: titanium and polyamide-6.6. Samples composed of a block of polyamide-6.6 welded to a titanium sheet were broken and analysed using XPS and ToF-SIMS. Results show more polymer in the weld and the chemical bond seems to be a complexation of titanium with the amide function. [less ▲]

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See detailEin binaurales Hörspiel über die Geschichte der akustischen 3D-Aufnahme
Krebs, Stefan UL

Scientific Conference (2019)

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See detailThe Quality of Work Index Luxembourg (QoWIL): A multidimensional approach and its links to well-being at work.
Sischka, Philipp UL; Fernandez de Henestrosa, Martha UL; Steffgen, Georges UL

Scientific Conference (2019)

Quality of work is a very often used and complex concept. We will present a new conceptualization of quality of work, compare it with the European Working Conditions Survey framework to measure job ... [more ▼]

Quality of work is a very often used and complex concept. We will present a new conceptualization of quality of work, compare it with the European Working Conditions Survey framework to measure job quality (Eurofund, 2017), and structure it with the help of the Job Demands-Resources model (Bakker & Demerouti, 2017). Based on this conceptualization we developed and validated a new measure of quality of work, the Quality of Work Index – Luxembourg (QoWIL) in three different languages (German, French, Luxembourgish). The QoWIL is composed of 43 items, focusing on four areas of work – work intensity, job design, physical conditions, and social conditions (subdivided in eleven components) – which are particularly important for employees’ well-being. Data were collected via computer-assisted telephone interviews in a representative sample of 1,522 employees working in Luxembourg (aged 17–67 years; 57.2% male). Confirmatory factor analysis confirmed the proposed factors structure and scalar measurement invariance for the three different language versions. Internal consistencies were satisfactory for all subscales (Cronbach’s α between .70 and .87). Correlations and hierarchical regression analysis with different psychological health measures (i.e., burnout, general well-being, psychosomatic complaints, work satisfaction, vigor) and subjective work performance confirmed the construct validity of the new questionnaire. We conclude that the QoWIL is globally and on the level of the sub-categories an effective tool to measure work quality, which could be used to compare work quality between organizations and different countries. Furthermore, the current study confirms associations between the different components of quality of work and employees health. Therefore, this new tool allows to monitor and to benchmark quality of work and health outcomes and compare them with each other, across gender, age, nationality and work sector. [less ▲]

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