References of "Unpublished conference"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Peer Reviewed
See detailBuffer XDEM
Mainassara Chekaraou, Abdoul Wahid UL; Besseron, Xavier UL; Rousset, Alban UL et al

Scientific Conference (in press)

Detailed reference viewed: 193 (70 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailUsing Passive Data Collection Methods to Learn Complex Mobility Patterns: An Exploratory Analysis
Toader, Bogdan UL; Cantelmo, Guido UL; Popescu, Mioara et al

Scientific Conference (in press)

Detailed reference viewed: 165 (14 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on the Luxembourgish Education System: Differences between students based on background characteristics in elementary and secondary school
Fischbach, Antoine UL; Colling, Joanne UL; Levy, Jessica UL et al

Scientific Conference (2021, November)

Policy responses to the COVID-19 pandemic (e.g., school closure, home-schooling) have affected students at various stages of education all over the world and were found to increase inequalities in ... [more ▼]

Policy responses to the COVID-19 pandemic (e.g., school closure, home-schooling) have affected students at various stages of education all over the world and were found to increase inequalities in academic achievement (OECD, 2021). The present study is based on fully representative large-scale data from the Luxembourg School Monitoring Programme (Épreuves Standardisées; ÉpStan; LUCET, 2021). The ÉpStan are assessing key competencies of primary and secondary school students in different subjects (e.g., German, French and Math). To allow a fair performance comparison, socio-economic and socio-cultural backgrounds of students (e.g., gender, migration and language background) are systematically taken into consideration. The ÉpStan 2020 entail data from approximatively 25.000 students from five different grades (elementary and secondary school), from 15.000 parents (elementary school) and comparative data from 160.000 students from previous cohorts, thus providing key empirical findings on the pandemic’s impact on the Luxembourgish education system. In the present contribution, we analyze a) how the results of standardized achievement tests compare to previous cohorts and under consideration of students’ socio-economical and socio-cultural background, as well as b) how parents and students perceived home-schooling with regard to aspects such as coping, technical equipment, motivation or contact to teachers. First results indicate that in Grades 1, 5, 7 and 9, standardized achievement scores were generally stable in comparison to previous years. However, in Grade 3, students’ competency scores in German (primary language of instruction in elementary school) listening comprehension worsened substantially. Furthermore, third graders from socio-economically disadvantaged households and/or students that do not speak Luxembourgish/German at home did worse in German reading comprehension than their peers from socio-economically advantaged households and/or speaking Luxembourgish/German at home. Concerning the perception of home-schooling, students coped rather well with the situation, with German being a bit more challenging in primary school and math in secondary school. Findings concerning motivation and enjoyment of home-schooling were mixed, with primary school students’ motivation being comparably to the regular school setting but approximately half of the secondary school students being less motivated than in the regular school setting. Furthermore, all households seem to have been well equipped, with the situation being slightly more favorable in socio-economically advantaged households. For the majority of students, the contact with teachers was frequent, with teachers having adapted their type of support to the needs of their students (e.g., more personal contact towards students from socio-economically disadvantaged households). To conclude, it can be said that no systematic negative trend has been identified in students’ achievement scores. Only German listening comprehension in Grade 3 has worsened substantially and these skills should therefore be fostered as early as possible. Overall, students coped rather well with home-schooling without, however, particularly enjoying it. While students entering the pandemic with favorable background characteristics (e.g., higher socio-economic status, speaking a language of instruction at home) managed better both regarding competencies and perception of home-schooling, students with less favorable background characteristics have received more differentiated support. These findings underline that already existing inequalities in the Luxembourgish school system have in parts been intensified by the pandemic. References LUCET. (2021). Épreuves Standardisées (ÉpStan). https://epstan.lu OECD. (2021). The State of School Education: One Year into the COVID Pandemic. OECD Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1787/201dde84-en [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 90 (7 UL)
See detailExploring the History of Digital History
Zaagsma, Gerben UL

Scientific Conference (2021, September 20)

As long as new preservation technologies and computing machines have been developed, the question of their utility and uptake in historical research practices has been debated. Yet, the very fact that ... [more ▼]

As long as new preservation technologies and computing machines have been developed, the question of their utility and uptake in historical research practices has been debated. Yet, the very fact that historical knowledge production has always been affected by new and emerging technologies is often forgotten. Similarly, the fact that key epistemological and methodological questions in what we now call ‘digital history’ were already debated decades ago by earlier generations of computing historians (analog and digital) is often overlooked. There is a lack of transmission of accumulated knowledge from the past and it sometimes seems as if every new generation of historians rediscovers the promise of ‘digital history’, with all of its attending hopes, visions and ambitions for reinventing and reshaping historical research. To fill this gap, this paper will explore what a history of digital history might look like. It will do so by focusing on hybridity as a key characteristic of historical research. Hybridity, seen as some form of integrating newly emerging tools, technologies, materials, and/or practices in historical research, has a long history that predates the advent of computers. In my paper I will map and qualify that history according to the main phases of historical research. The paper will conclude by outlining what groundwork is necessary to explore digital history’s forgotten roots: a basic overview of the field’s different spatio-temporal and ideological trajectories and recreation of the networks of computing historians in the pre-PC and early PC period. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 45 (0 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailFacets of conscientiousness and their relation to academic achievement: a person-centered approach
Franzen, Patrick UL; Niepel, Christoph UL; Arens, A Katrin et al

Scientific Conference (2021, September 16)

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (0 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailLuxembourg Perspectives on Pre-Service Teacher Motivation: What Factors Influence the Choice of Becoming a Teacher, Perseverance and Success?
Rivas, Salvador UL; Poncelet, Débora UL; Reeff, Alain et al

Scientific Conference (2021, September 02)

In 2016, UNESCO estimated that 24.4 million primary school teachers and another 44.4 million secondary school teachers were needed to provide every child in the world access to education. Widespread ... [more ▼]

In 2016, UNESCO estimated that 24.4 million primary school teachers and another 44.4 million secondary school teachers were needed to provide every child in the world access to education. Widespread teacher shortages have led researchers to investigate what motivates candidates to become teachers and to remain in the profession (see for example Watt et al., 2012). Luxembourg is no exception, in 2019 for example, the government wanted to hire 320 new teachers at the fundamental school level; however, only 63 graduates from the country’s main teacher training programme at the University of Luxembourg took the required state exam to join the teaching ranks. The country needs 300 to 400 new fundamental schoolteachers per year to keep up with population growth. To help address this need, we draw on 10 years of admissions data (exam performance and noncognitive indicators) collected from candidates seeking entry to the University of Luxembourg’s teacher training programme. Our study investigates the major correlates, similarities and differences, between candidates that never-registered, i.e., candidates that after being admitted never start the programme; drop-outs, i.e., students that start but never finish; and of course, those that persist until completion. While circumstances may differ between these types of candidates, the first two nevertheless took-up the place that someone else who could have finished and possibly become a teacher. In light of the pressing need for more teachers, this study identifies important factors associated with showing up and staying in the programme until the end. Policy implications are described and discussed. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 30 (2 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThreat Adaptive Byzantine Fault Tolerant State-Machine Replication
Simoes Silva, Douglas UL; Graczyk, Rafal UL; Decouchant, Jérémie et al

Scientific Conference (2021, September)

Critical infrastructures have to withstand advanced and persistent threats, which can be addressed using Byzantine fault tolerant state-machine replication (BFT-SMR). In practice, unattended cyberdefense ... [more ▼]

Critical infrastructures have to withstand advanced and persistent threats, which can be addressed using Byzantine fault tolerant state-machine replication (BFT-SMR). In practice, unattended cyberdefense systems rely on threat level detectors that synchronously inform them of changing threat levels. How- ever, to have a BFT-SMR protocol operate unattended, the state- of-the-art is still to configure them to withstand the highest possible number of faulty replicas f they might encounter, which limits their performance, or to make the strong assumption that a trusted external reconfiguration service is available, which introduces a single point of failure. In this work, we present ThreatAdaptive the first BFT-SMR protocol that is automatically strengthened or optimized by its replicas in reaction to threat level changes. We first determine under which conditions replicas can safely reconfigure a BFT-SMR system, i.e., adapt the number of replicas n and the fault threshold f, so as to outpace an adversary. Since replicas typically communicate with each other using an asynchronous network they cannot rely on consensus to decide how the system should be reconfigured. ThreatAdaptive avoids this pitfall by proactively preparing the reconfiguration that may be triggered by an increasing threat when it optimizes its performance. Our evaluation shows that ThreatAdaptive can meet the latency and throughput of BFT baselines configured statically for a particular level of threat, and adapt 30% faster than previous methods, which make stronger assumptions to provide safety. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 129 (18 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMoral Judgment in Video Games: Effects of Medium, Moral Intuitions and Media-Based Empathy
Grohmann, Lara; Holl, Elisabeth UL; Melzer, André UL

Scientific Conference (2021, September)

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCharacterizing the Impact of Network Delay on Bitcoin Mining
Cao, Tong UL; Decouchant, Jérémie UL; Yu, Jiangshan et al

Scientific Conference (2021, September)

Detailed reference viewed: 94 (23 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailAn Integrative Model of Moral Processing for the Video Game Medium
Melzer, André UL; Holl, Elisabeth UL

Scientific Conference (2021, September)

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMeta-Analytic Structural Equation Models of Executive Functions and Math Intelligence in Preschool Children
Emslander, Valentin UL; Scherer, Ronny

Scientific Conference (2021, September)

BACKGROUND: Response inhibition, attention shifting, and working memory updating are the three core executive functions (EFs; Miyake et al., 2000) underlying other cognitive skills that are relevant for ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Response inhibition, attention shifting, and working memory updating are the three core executive functions (EFs; Miyake et al., 2000) underlying other cognitive skills that are relevant for learning and everyday life. For example, they have shown to be differentially related to the mathematical component of intelligence (i.e., math intelligence) in school students and adults. While researchers suppose these three EFs to become more differentiated from early childhood to adulthood, neither the link of these constructs nor their structure has been conclusively established in preschool children yet. Primary studies on path models connecting EFs and math intelligence diverge in the exact relation of EFs and math intelligence. It remains unclear whether inhibition, shifting, and updating exhibit distinct but correlated constructs with respect to their relation to math intelligence. OBJECTIVES: With our meta-analysis, we aimed to (a) synthesize the relation between the three EFs and math intelligence in preschool children; and (b) compare plausible models of the effects of EFs on math intelligence. METHODS/RESULTS: Synthesizing data from 47 studies (363 effect sizes, 30,481 participants) from the last two decades via novel multilevel and multivariate meta-analytic models (Pustejovsky & Tipton, 2020), we found the three core EFs to be significantly related to math intelligence: Inhibition ("r" ̅ = .30, 95 % CI [.25, .35]), shifting ("r" ̅ = .32, 95 % CI [.25, .38]), and updating ("r" ̅ = .36, 95 % CI [.31, .40]). Looking at the three core EFs as one construct, the correlation was "r" ̅ = .34, 95 % CI [.31, .37]. Utilizing correlation-based, meta-analytic structural equation modeling (Jak & Cheung, 2020), our results exhibited significant relations of all EFs to math intelligence. These relations did not differ between the three core EFs. DISCUSSION: Our findings corroborate the positive link between EFs and math intelligence in preschool children and are similar to other age groups. From the model testing, we learned that representing EFs by a latent variable, thus capturing the covariance among the three core EFs, explained substantially more variation in math intelligence than representing them as distinct constructs. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 82 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailTeacher expectations and emotions concerning students with special needs or immigrant background
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Krischler, Mireille UL

Scientific Conference (2021, August 23)

Teachers are faced with increasingly heterogenous student groups, whereby the successful inclusion of all students largely depend on teachers´ competence and attitudes. Attitudes are understood as a ... [more ▼]

Teachers are faced with increasingly heterogenous student groups, whereby the successful inclusion of all students largely depend on teachers´ competence and attitudes. Attitudes are understood as a multifaceted construct with cognitive, affective and conative components. In the current study we investigated to what extent teachers´ expectations concerning students´ academic performance - reflecting the cognitive component of attitudes - varied as a function of specific student characteristics (special educational needs and immigrant background). In addition, we assessed teachers´ emotions - reflecting the affective component of attitudes - concerning the inclusion of these students in mainstream education. Result confirmed previous findings that teachers´ expectations and emotions vary as a function of student characteristics. Teachers had lower expectations of the academic performance of students with learning difficulties than students with challenging behaviour, whereby the estimates of German proficiency were also affected by the immigrant background of the student. Teachers felt however less positive about the inclusion of students with challenging behaviour than of students with learning difficulties, regardless of the immigrant background of the student. Results will be discussed in relation to theory and their practical implications. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 26 (0 UL)
Full Text
See detailA conceptual model for understanding vulnerability in the context of migration
Gilodi, Amalia UL

Scientific Conference (2021, August 05)

The notion of ‘vulnerability’ is as popular as it is fuzzy. Its increased prominence in social research and in political and humanitarian discourses on migration has led many scholars and practitioners to ... [more ▼]

The notion of ‘vulnerability’ is as popular as it is fuzzy. Its increased prominence in social research and in political and humanitarian discourses on migration has led many scholars and practitioners to treat the concept as self-explanatory, without problematizing neither its conceptualization nor its use and possible negative societal and psychological consequences. Set within the framework of the EU-funded project MIMY (n°870700), investigating the processes of integration of young migrants in 9 European countries, this paper critically evaluates different conceptualizations and uses of vulnerability and proposes a new multilevel conceptual model for understanding vulnerability in the context of migration. Focusing on different levels of analysis, the model situates individuals and groups in the broader socio-political hierarchies and power dynamics that inevitably affect them (structural vulnerability), acknowledges how these systems are (re)produced in situated interpersonal relationships (situational vulnerability) and accounts for migrants’ biographical and psychological experiences of vulnerability. Focusing on the interrelationships between levels of analysis, the model highlights how macro conditions and definitions of vulnerability may affect individual experiences, through processes such as stigmatization, internalization of stereotypes, disempowerment, but also how individuals can actively negotiate their ascribed ‘vulnerability’ through processes such as resistance, mobilization and collective action. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (0 UL)
Full Text
See detailDeparture and Trajectory Design Applications using Stretching Directions
Muralidharan, Vivek UL; Howell, Kathleen C.

Scientific Conference (2021, August)

Stable or nearly stable orbits do not always possess well-distinguished manifold structures that assist in departing from or arriving onto the orbit. Generally, for potential missions, the orbits of ... [more ▼]

Stable or nearly stable orbits do not always possess well-distinguished manifold structures that assist in departing from or arriving onto the orbit. Generally, for potential missions, the orbits of interest are nearly stable to reduce the possibility of rapid departure. The stable nature of these orbits also serves as a drawback for insertion or departure from the orbit. The Near Rectilinear Halo Orbits (NRHOs) and the Distant Retrograde Orbits (DROs) offer some potential long-horizon trajectories for exploration missions. The current investigation focuses on leveraging the stretching direction as a tool for departure and trajectory design applications. The magnitude of the state variations along the maximum stretching direction is expected to grow rapidly and, therefore, offers information for efficient departure from the orbit. Similarly, the maximum stretching in reverse time, enables arrival with a minimal maneuver magnitude. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 96 (3 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailVisual primes as culture-sensitive method to understanding acculturation processes
Murdock, Elke UL; Campill, Marc-Antoine; Valsiner, Jaan

Scientific Conference (2021, July 31)

One facet of contemporary societies is their increasingly divers composition. With a foreign population percentage of 47, 5 %, Luxembourg is an example for a super-diverse society and provides a rich ... [more ▼]

One facet of contemporary societies is their increasingly divers composition. With a foreign population percentage of 47, 5 %, Luxembourg is an example for a super-diverse society and provides a rich context to explore acculturation processes. The majority of immigrants have European roots, but the number of non-European immigrants is rising. Within this qualitative study we examined the identity construction processes of eight Japanese women living in Luxembourg using several visual primes guiding the interview. Building on Ying-yi Hong’s work on cultural mixing we developed hybrid images to evoke affective responses and to capture the negotiation processes between cultures. The choice of images was carefully prepared and first involved an ethnographic study of cultural dimensions of Japan and Luxembourg. Based on this analysis we decided to explore the domains of beauty, food, living, leisure and family. For each domain, we chose a prototypical European and Japanese image and created a hybrid image. All images were culturally meaningful and anchored in real life experiences. The Japanese images were tested in a pilot study in Japan. The interviews were carefully planned, each phase involving different visual stimuli. In the opening phase, the interviewer presented a business card in three different designs – European, Japanese and a mixed version. Interviewees could choose their preferred version and explain their choice. Next, a series of 15 matched typical images of Japan and Luxembourg were shown and the interviewees again chose their preferred images and explained their choice. Finally, the five sets of domain-specific images were presented. These provided a context for narration and especially the reaction to the hybrid stimuli showed how participants negotiate their cultural identities. The visual primes made the negotiation strategies visible. Findings from this study and the potential of this culture-sensitive method for accessing the process of acculturation will be discussed. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (0 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailDeveloping a talent: An exploratory study of Talent Management in Russia
Usanova, Ksenia UL

Scientific Conference (2021, July 29)

Detailed reference viewed: 176 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMulticultural Identity Integration – the importance of the context of the family
Murdock, Elke UL; Gales, Sissy

Scientific Conference (2021, July 28)

Acculturation has been described as multidimensional process consisting of the confluence of different cultural practices, values and identifications. A growing body of research focuses on the ... [more ▼]

Acculturation has been described as multidimensional process consisting of the confluence of different cultural practices, values and identifications. A growing body of research focuses on the understanding identifications of persons growing up with multiple cultural experiences and how these influences are negotiated within themselves. The current study draws on a qualitative design and involved a semi-structured interview and two exercises designed to stimulate reflection on cultural influences. We recruited eight female participants, aged between 21 and 25 years, who all grew up in Germany. Their parents originate from a wide range of countries of various cultural distance to Germany. Fairly homogenous in terms of socioeconomic status and educational background, the sample was very diverse in terms of cultural influences. Half of our participants grew up in mixed national families. Building on the multicultural identity integration research we were particularly interested whether participants identify with one cultural group over others (categorization), keep their influences separate (compartmentalization) or link their cultural influences (integration) and drivers for each outcome. The results point towards the important role of parents regarding cultural resources and practices. Our results point to categorization, if there is little or no contact to one parent, compartmentalization, if the relationship between parents is conflicted and integration if both parents engage equally in cultural maintenance. Families are the primary socialization unit and our findings suggest that parental commitment to transfer of cultural values and practices impacts the cultural identity configurations. Findings will be discussed in a systemic perspective of identity construal processes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 96 (0 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailSymposium: Immigrants‘ Acculturation across the Lifespan
Schwarz, Beate; Maehler, Debora; Murdock, Elke UL et al

Scientific Conference (2021, July 28)

Immigrants’ acculturation is a bi-linear process that refer to the orientation towards the host and the ethnic culture. Additionally, acculturation is a multidimensional construct that comprises changes ... [more ▼]

Immigrants’ acculturation is a bi-linear process that refer to the orientation towards the host and the ethnic culture. Additionally, acculturation is a multidimensional construct that comprises changes with respect to practices and behaviors, values and norms, and identity and identification (Schwartz, Unger, Zamboanga, & Szapocznik, 2010). From a developmental perspective, acculturation of first and second-generation immigrants differ remarkably because usually second generation immigrants have more opportunities to interact with representatives of the host culture in a phase of life with high plasticity (Sam & Oppedal, 2003). The symposium wants to gain insight into the complex acculturation processes with four studies that referred to different dimensions of acculturation and including age groups from adolescence to old age. The studies used quantitative and qualitative analyses and variable- as well as person-centered approaches. Starting with adolescence, Maehler provides a meta-analysis on factors that are related to identification with the ethnic and mainstream culture. Murdock and Gales also refer to the identity dimension of acculturation, here among young adults in Germany. With a qualitative approach they identified the role of the parents and the intergenerational relationships for the way how these young adults integrate both identities. In the third study with middle-aged second- generation immigrants in Switzerland, again intergenerational relationships are in the focus. Schwarz and Pfammatter analyzed the association of intergenerational relationships with orientations toward ethnic and mainstream culture. In the last study, Albert and colleagues used a person-centered approach. They investigated the patterns of sense of belonging on a local and national level of older immigrants in Luxembourg and the associations with expectations to stay and well-being. All four studies provide specific insight into the acculturation mechanism that are relevant in different periods of the lifespan. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailRoma (2018) d’Alfonso Cuaron : “C’est seulement l’eau qui révèle la verité dans ce film”
Weber, Jean-Marie UL

Scientific Conference (2021, July 13)

Des vagues qui nous font jouir et qui nous apprennent à désirer Depuis ses débuts le cinéma semble l’art le plus apte à chercher, du côté de l’étrangeté, de l’indicible, de l’inconscient. C’est le « divan ... [more ▼]

Des vagues qui nous font jouir et qui nous apprennent à désirer Depuis ses débuts le cinéma semble l’art le plus apte à chercher, du côté de l’étrangeté, de l’indicible, de l’inconscient. C’est le « divan du pauvre », nous dit Guattari. En tout cas il est subversif comme la psychanalyse. Selon Slavoj Zizek il constitue un dispositif qui nous fait jouir et un lieu pédagogique qui nous apprend à désirer. Notre propos est de montrer à travers des extraits des films comme « Persona » de Bergman, « Breaking the Waves » de Lars von Trier, Silence de Scorsese , et « Les Quatre Cents Coups » de Truffaut, comment l’artiste nous confronte avec le réel et avec le fait qu’il n’y a plus de grand Autre. Ces scènes se jouent au bord de la mer, de l’étrangeté, finalement du traumatique. Touchés par la violence des vagues et la force du pulsionnel nous sommes confrontés avec notre regard, notre jouissance et notre désir. C’est en tant que « parlêtre » (Lacan), et plus spécifiquement en tant qu’être pulsionnel que nous nous rencontrons à travers de telles scènes. C’est finalement notre implication dans le film qui est questionnée dans notre intervention. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 51 (0 UL)
Full Text
See detailQuelles solutions face à l’impossibilité de former des paires de tandems ?
Lejot, Eve UL; Molostoff, Leslie UL

Scientific Conference (2021, July 12)

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (0 UL)
See detailPanel Organiser: Meeting the Editors: De Gruyter Book Series 'Migrations in History'
Venken, Machteld UL

Scientific Conference (2021, July 09)

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailOn the move within themselves – cultural distance and negotiation processes of cultural belonging
Murdock, Elke UL; Gales, Sissy

Scientific Conference (2021, July 08)

In a boundary crossing world, having exposure to multiple cultures is becoming norm rather than exception. Children of migrants and children born into mixed national families grow up with more than one ... [more ▼]

In a boundary crossing world, having exposure to multiple cultures is becoming norm rather than exception. Children of migrants and children born into mixed national families grow up with more than one cultural point of reference from birth. In the growing body of literature on bi- and multiculturalism different models of cultural acquisition are described, but still little is known about how the negotiation process takes place and what factors facilitate resolution and well-being. The present study builds on a recent theoretical framework on multicultural identity integration developed by Yampolsky et al. and investigates the role of cultural distance in the negotiation process for cultural belonging. For the present study, we conducted semi-structured interviews with eight young women (Mage = 22.6). All grew up in Germany, yet each had a very different other cultural background ranging from Chile, Columbia, France, Ghana, Hungary, Luxembourg, Russia to Sri Lanka. We asked participants about their sense of belonging, perceived similarities and differences between their cultural influences and their way of positioning themselves within these. Each interview was complemented by two visual exercises illustrating the sense of belonging. The results show that all participants engaged in active negotiation processes and arrived at very different solutions in terms of belonging. The cultural integration process depends on a multitude of factors – cultural distance being one, but parents playing an important role. The findings will be discussed in light of current acculturation models. Explanations will be provided with special focus on implications for migration and acculturation research. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 101 (0 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailSymposium: Crossing borders – feeling connected? An exploration of drivers influencing the development of a sense of belonging in the receiving society
Murdock, Elke UL; Albert, Isabelle UL; Decieux, Jean Philippe Pierre UL et al

Scientific Conference (2021, July 08)

Migrants face the complex task of establishing bonds with the receiving society. The development of a sense of belonging is linked to subjective wellbeing. The present panel investigates factors ... [more ▼]

Migrants face the complex task of establishing bonds with the receiving society. The development of a sense of belonging is linked to subjective wellbeing. The present panel investigates factors influencing the development of a sense of belonging. It brings together researchers from four different countries, applying different methodological approaches examining the development of belonging among different migrant groups. Jean Décieux explores the role of cultural distance in the host country adjustment process. Suggesting a multidimensional conceptualization of cultural distance, he presents findings based on recently migrated German nationals (N = 2856) drawn from the German Emigration and Remigration Panel Study (GERPS). The role of cultural distance in negotiating belonging among young migrant women growing up in Germany is the subject of Elke Murdock’s qualitative study. Results point to the important role of parents in the process. How parents’ commitment or lack of commitment affects their children’s construction of their sense of belonging is the focus of Anna Gruszczynska’s qualitative study among immigrant youth in the UK. She shows the fluctuating nature of the pursuit of belonging in time and space. Gry Paulgaard focuses on immigrants arriving in the rural space of Northern Norway. The project explores everyday life practices of refugees taking the materiality of a place as a starting point, acknowledging the interdependency between the social and material contexts for practice. Finally, Isabelle Albert investigates practices by older migrants living in multicultural Luxembourg, their engagement or otherwise in social practices and how this impacts on their sense of belonging. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 61 (0 UL)
Full Text
See detailVulnerability in the context of migration: a critical assessment of its conceptualizations and uses
Gilodi, Amalia UL; Albert, Isabelle UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Scientific Conference (2021, July 07)

The notions of ‘vulnerability’ and ‘vulnerable group’ have increasingly gained prominence in academic literature, policymaking, humanitarian debates and everyday discourses on migration and asylum. Its ... [more ▼]

The notions of ‘vulnerability’ and ‘vulnerable group’ have increasingly gained prominence in academic literature, policymaking, humanitarian debates and everyday discourses on migration and asylum. Its popularity, not limited to this field, has often led academics and practitioners to use ‘vulnerability’ as a self-explanatory condition or phenomenon. However, vulnerability is neither conceptually straight-forward nor politically and morally neutral. Multiple definitions and operationalizations of vulnerability exist across and within different fields of research and practice, without a common and systematic understanding of the concept. The notion of vulnerability can also be instrumentilised as a tool for discrimination, stigmatization, control, exclusion or even reduction of humanitarian assistance, when access to protection is restricted to ‘the most vulnerable’. In the context of the H2020 project MIMY (n°870700), this paper examines the multiplicities and hidden pitfalls behind different conceptualizations and uses of vulnerability and critically reflects on their implication for the study and governance of migration. By unpacking this concept, we hope to highlight both limitations and opportunities enclosed in the notion of vulnerability and encourage migration scholars to understand, address and take a stand before its complexities. Based on these considerations, a multilevel conceptual model of vulnerability in the specific context of migration is proposed. The model aims to capture several types and understandings of vulnerability and how these are (re)produced at different levels and by different actors, including migrants themselves. Particular attention is paid to migrants’ biographical and psychological experiences of vulnerability and how policy and political frameworks may affect them. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (2 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHistoricizing Media and Communication Concepts of the Digital Age: Global Governance
Musiani, Francesca; Schafer, Valerie UL

Scientific Conference (2021, July 02)

History is relevant for the concept of global governance for at least two reasons: to historicize the concept in itself through the Internet/digital age (the evolution and enrichment of the notion in the ... [more ▼]

History is relevant for the concept of global governance for at least two reasons: to historicize the concept in itself through the Internet/digital age (the evolution and enrichment of the notion in the past 30 years, with key turning points such as the creation of ICANN and WSIS) and to flesh out continuities through time with other “global media” or “global issues,” such as international standardization, multi-stakeholderism and communication rights. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 54 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailWeb archiving of the COVID crisis in Europe : Close reading's challenges
Schafer, Valerie UL

Scientific Conference (2021, July 02)

The second part of this panel focuses on the methodologies and research approaches at stake when scholars face such rich but also heterogeneous collections: Susan Aasman (University of Groningen, The ... [more ▼]

The second part of this panel focuses on the methodologies and research approaches at stake when scholars face such rich but also heterogeneous collections: Susan Aasman (University of Groningen, The Netherlands), Karin de Wild (Leiden University, The Netherlands) and Nicola Bingham will provide feedback on a very concrete experiment that the working group is conducting through a Datathon based on metadata and derived data. This distant reading approach is complemented by a more qualitative approach, which also raises challenges, as Valérie Schafer will explain. The presentation of several concrete research topics will further demonstrate the methodological challenges at stake. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (2 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailDigging into Digital Roots: introduction
Ribeiro, Nelson; Schafer, Valerie UL

Scientific Conference (2021, July)

Presentation of the project at stake (a collective book whose idea was born within the ECREA Communication History Section), its approach and theoretical framework.

Detailed reference viewed: 67 (2 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailMeasuring multicultural ideology: Scale development and validation in different languages and contexts
Stogianni, Maria UL; Schmidt, Lea Marie; Murdock, Elke UL et al

Scientific Conference (2021, July)

Increased migration has led to the formation of culturally diverse societies in many places around the world. The concept of Multicultural Ideology incorporates two values as a way to promote positive ... [more ▼]

Increased migration has led to the formation of culturally diverse societies in many places around the world. The concept of Multicultural Ideology incorporates two values as a way to promote positive intercultural relations: a) Diversity: the presence of ethnocultural diversity in the population and b) Equity: the right for equal participation of all cultural groups in the society. Both diversity and equity are necessary conditions for the success of multicultural policies. Culturally heterogeneous communities that do not support inclusion and equitable participation of all groups face the negative consequences of segregation and marginalization. In line with this notion, an international research consortium is developing a revised version of the Multicultural Ideology Scale to assess the endorsement of multicultural ideology in different national contexts. The scale aims to distinguish various attitudinal dimensions of multiculturalism, relevant to the acceptance of diversity and social inclusion of different ethnocultural groups: Cultural Maintenance, Social Interaction, Equity/Inclusion, Extent of Differences, Conflictual Relations, Essentialistic Boundaries. We present the first assessment of the new scale in the German language. The survey was administered online to a sample of native German citizens (N = 382) with different demographic characteristics. Our aim was to understand the attitude of native citizens towards cultural diversity and their willingness to have members of ethnic minority groups be included in the larger society. We investigated the factor structure of the scale, its psychometric properties, and the relationship between multicultural ideology and some individual difference variables, such as ethnic group attachment and social dominance orientation. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 206 (8 UL)
See detailSmall in size, great in significance: conspicilla and perspicilla in the visual arts of the Low Countries around 1600
Koeleman, Floor UL

Scientific Conference (2021, July)

A largely forgotten constcamer painting from the early seventeenth century shows eyeglasses and a telescope in close proximity. The inclusion of these extensions of sight in The Five Senses of the Musée ... [more ▼]

A largely forgotten constcamer painting from the early seventeenth century shows eyeglasses and a telescope in close proximity. The inclusion of these extensions of sight in The Five Senses of the Musée Magnin (Dijon) seems to allude to the implicit link between the two. As tools to observe with and through, these instruments visualize the limits of human perception and the ability to alter the scale of the visible world. The Five Senses was created in Antwerp around the same time the telescope first appeared in textual sources, namely 1608. However, the optical instrument is likely to have existed for years by then. This paper investigates if any references to the telescope in the visual arts predate the first written evidence of its invention. For artists the early telescope was probably not that challenging an object to represent. The exterior, a simple tube characterized by a diaphragm, housed two lenses made by the same glass industry that manufactured eyeglasses. This paper takes a closer look at the imagery of eyeglasses and telescopes, depicted in the visual arts of the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. The meaning assigned to these instruments can be inferred from the context in which they are presented and their relative scale. Together eyeglasses and telescopes feature prominently in constcamer paintings dedicated to visual perception, understood both physically and metaphysically. While the exact date of creation remains subject to debate, The Five Senses probably contains the earliest known depiction of a telescope – true to scale. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 194 (2 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMeasuring Executive Functions and their Relation to Math Intelligence in Preschool Children: A Meta-Analysis
Emslander, Valentin UL; Scherer, Ronny

Scientific Conference (2021, July)

Introduction: Executive functions (inhibition, attention shifting, updating) are linked to math intelligence in school students and adults. This link is particularly important because performance in ... [more ▼]

Introduction: Executive functions (inhibition, attention shifting, updating) are linked to math intelligence in school students and adults. This link is particularly important because performance in school mathematics is predictive of various competencies later in life. While some researchers argue that tests of executive functions and math intelligence measure the same underlying construct, others argue that they measure distinct but correlated constructs. Also, evidence on the differentiation of cognitive skills over time exists. Clarifying the relation between executive functions and math intelligence is, however, challenging, especially because preschoolers cannot fill in commonly used questionnaires that require them to read. As a consequence, researchers have to resort to behavioral, verbal, apparatus-, or computer-based assessments of executive functions. Objectives/Methodology: With this meta-analysis of 29 studies containing 268 effect sizes, we examined the link between executive functions and math intelligence for a total sample of 25,510 preschool children. Specifically, we synthesized the corresponding correlations and sought to clarify which executive function assessments were used for preschool children and how the assessment characteristics may moderate the correlation between executive functions and mathematical skills. Results: Utilizing three-level random-effects meta-analysis, we found a moderate correlation between executive functions and mathematical skills in preschool children, r = 0.35. The type of assessment (behavioral, verbal, apparatus-, or computer-based assessments) did not moderate this relation. Differentiating between the three executive functions revealed average correlations of r = 0.30 between math and inhibition, r = 0.38 between math and attention shifting, and r = 0.36 between math and updating. These analyses will be supplemented by further moderator analyses. Conclusions: Our findings support the significant link between executive functions and mathematical skills in preschoolers—yet, the average correlations do not suggest that both measures are identical. Results will be discussed against the background of deployed assessments and testing environments. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 61 (4 UL)
See detailKnowledge assessment with concept maps: Opportunities and challenges
Rohles, Björn UL; Koenig, Vincent UL; Fischbach, Antoine UL et al

Scientific Conference (2021, July)

21st-century digital society poses tremendous challenges for education and assessment. Learners have to understand the complex relations between diverse topics and learn how to learn their entire lives ... [more ▼]

21st-century digital society poses tremendous challenges for education and assessment. Learners have to understand the complex relations between diverse topics and learn how to learn their entire lives. Concept mapping is a promising approach to address these issues. It is a method that uses concepts connected by labeled links to visualize a semantic network of knowledge. Concept mapping is predestined for a digital approach because it allows for easy interactive editing, innovative test items, and incorporation of multimodal information. Concept mapping is available for summative and formative assessment and, thus, provides the opportunity to become a vital part of modern education. The biggest advantage of concept mapping (i.e., a comprehensive and yet comprehensible visualization of complex relations) also represents the biggest challenge when it comes to assessment with - and scoring of - concept maps. The first challenge is the enormous amount of indicators used for scoring concept maps in assessment. A second challenge comes from the fact that educators using concept mapping in their assessment have to understand and interpret the indicators that are used in scoring concept maps. This presentation reports on a Ph.D. project that investigates digital concept mapping in the context of knowledge assessment from a user experience perspective. The results are based on, first, a comprehensive international systematic literature review on concept map scoring, and second, three empirical studies covering the needs and experiences of learners and educators in concept mapping. It presents key findings from the iterative user experience design of a concept mapping tool as part of the online assessment platform OASYS, an overview of indicators used in concept map scoring, and research opportunities in knowledge assessment with concept maps. Finally, it stresses the value that user experience design brings to knowledge assessment with concept maps. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 121 (9 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailScaling of urban heat island and NO2 with urban population: A meta-analysis
Wei, Yufei UL; Caruso, Geoffrey UL; Lemoy, Rémi

Scientific Conference (2021, June 29)

Detailed reference viewed: 80 (4 UL)
Full Text
See detailWorkshop : Data as a new resource? Similarities and differences of data vs. material resources
Schafer, Valerie UL; Veraart, Frank; Niet, Irene

Scientific Conference (2021, June 29)

This exploratory workshop is dedicated to scholars interested in technological developments related to digital technologies and resource developments. The workshop focusses on three notions: (1 ... [more ▼]

This exploratory workshop is dedicated to scholars interested in technological developments related to digital technologies and resource developments. The workshop focusses on three notions: (1) historical parallels of digital data with the development of other key material resources, (2) data as a commodity and its infrastructure, and (3) sustainability issues and (big)data. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (0 UL)
Full Text
See detailThe effect of temperature and joining speed on the joining quality for conduction laser joining of metals to polymers
Amne Elahi, Mahdi UL; Hennico, Max; Plapper, Peter UL

Scientific Conference (2021, June 24)

Laser joining of metals to polymers offers several advantages to produce lightweight hybrid assemblies. An important one is the exceptional control over the heat input which defines the temperature at the ... [more ▼]

Laser joining of metals to polymers offers several advantages to produce lightweight hybrid assemblies. An important one is the exceptional control over the heat input which defines the temperature at the interface of the materials. Initially, the in-situ heating observation of PA inside ESEM is considered. Then, aluminum and polyamide are joined in an overlap configuration while the temperature was recorded simultaneously at different areas between the materials. The results show that due to excessive heat input, polyamide degrades and leaves bubbles in the melted area. Finally, the materials are laser joined with several joining speeds to investigate different cooling rates of the polyamide during the joining process. It is concluded that joining with high cooling rates generates an amorphous melted layer of the polyamide which is different from the semi-crystalline structure of the bulk. This difference acts as a stress concentration zone and reduces the shear strength of the assembly. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 43 (1 UL)
Full Text
See detailIterative STEAM design in primary grades and in pre-service teacher training
Kreis, Yves UL; Haas, Ben

Scientific Conference (2021, June 24)

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (3 UL)
Full Text
See detailPrediction of Cu-Al weld status using convolutional neural network
Mathivanan, Karthik UL; Plapper, Peter UL

Scientific Conference (2021, June 21)

Welding copper (Cu) and aluminum (Al) result in brittle intermetallic (IMC) phases, which reduces the joint performance. The key for a strong joint is to maintain an optimum amount of Al and Cu ... [more ▼]

Welding copper (Cu) and aluminum (Al) result in brittle intermetallic (IMC) phases, which reduces the joint performance. The key for a strong joint is to maintain an optimum amount of Al and Cu composition in the joint. To implement this without the destruction of the sample is a challenge. For this purpose, high-resolution images of the weld zone are utilized after welding. With the image processing technique, the presence of (Al/Cu) material melted is distinguished. Therefore, the different weld type/status like insufficient melt, optimum melt, and excessive melt is detected from the images. This paper analyses the weld images and applies the convolutional neural network technique to predict the weld type. The microstructure and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) analysis of the fusion zone for each weld type are correlated to the weld images. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 47 (2 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEr ist Prinz. – Mehr noch: Er ist Mensch! Er ist Stimmbürger. Stimmrecht des Monarchen als Dispersionsprisma einer rechtswissenschaftlichen Monarchieanalyse
Heuschling, Luc UL

Scientific Conference (2021, June 18)

In the literature on comparative constitutional law and constitutional theory, monarchies are, if they attract any attention at all, most frequently analyzed from the perspective of the monarch’s ... [more ▼]

In the literature on comparative constitutional law and constitutional theory, monarchies are, if they attract any attention at all, most frequently analyzed from the perspective of the monarch’s political power, after its more or less extensive “neutralization” in the name of the constitutional ideals of Enlightenment. Yet this classic approach, whose focus lies on the State organ’s competencies and the discretion of its royal incumbent, is incomplete as it ignores a second, increasingly important facet of the modernization process of monarchies: To what extent do Royals, including the monarch, have fundamental rights as individuals, as “human beings”? This paper considers in particular the even-more-overlooked issue of their political rights (right to vote, right to stand for election, and the right to use the instruments of direct democracy). The issue, which is a very old one, having being addressed first by Sieyès in his famous 1789 speech on royal veto and by the French Constitution of 1791, is far from being odd or futile. In some jurisdictions, like in Japan (1945), Luxembourg (2004-5), Liechtenstein (2002-3) or in Thailand (2019), it was at the core of quite controversial public debates which, eventually, lead to totally divergent outcomes. Beyond its (relative) importance in practice, it is a key parameter for theoretical purposes: combined with the criteria of the dualistic state organization, it provides a deeper insight into the complex structure of those regimes mixing, in various ways, both monarchical and democratic elements. This article sheds light on this new research field, starting with a broad historical and comparative survey, before presenting a typology in order to tackle the startling diversity of legal solutions. In der heutigen Literatur zur Verfassungsrechtsvergleichung und allgemeinen Verfassungstheorie wird das Thema der Monarchien eher stiefmütterlich behandelt. Soweit sich diese Literatur damit abfasst, behandelt sie vor allem die Frage der politischen Macht der Monarchen und ihrer „Neutralisierung“ im Rahmen des auf den Idealen der Aufklärung fußenden Modernisierungsprogramms. Diese klassische Lesart, deren Fokus auf den Kompetenzen des Staatsorgans „Monarch“ und auf dem (verbleibenden) Ermessen des monarchischen Organwalters liegt, verkennt jedoch eine zweite, an Bedeutung stets zunehmende Facette der Modernisierungsdynamik: In welchem Maße sind die Royals, darunter auch der Monarch selbst, als Individuen, als „Menschen“, Träger von Grundrechten? Dieser Beitrag beschäftigt sich mit dem noch weniger belichteten Unterthema ihres Stimmrechts (aktives Wahlrecht, Wählbarkeit, Benutzung von direktdemokratischen Instrumenten). Für viele mag diese Perspektive verstörend neu wirken. In den Augen einiger wäre es nur eine Randnotiz wert. Eine solche Einschätzung geht jedoch fehl. Das Thema ist sehr alt, wurde es doch zum ersten Mal 1789 von Sieyès, in seiner berühmten Rede zum königlichen Veto, und in der französischen Verfassung von 1791 angeschnitten. Im Laufe des 20. und 21. Jahrhundert hat es in verschiedenen Ländern – in Japan (1945), in Luxemburg (2004-5), in Liechtenstein (2002-3) und in Thailand (2019) – zu teils hitzigen Debatten geführt, mit jeweils sehr unterschiedlichen Resultaten. Ziel dieses Beitrags ist es, an erster Stelle, die Gesamtentwicklung dieser Thematik in Europa und in der Welt, ab 1789, rechtshistorisch und rechtsvergleichend nachzuzeichnen. Darüber hinaus, gilt es, den bisher unausgeschöpften heuristischen Mehrwert dieser Problematik für eine schärfere, rechtswissenschaftliche Analyse der früheren und heutigen demokratisierten Monarchien (oder monarchischen Demokratien) darzulegen. Diese Frage wirft, in der Tat, ein ganz anderes, neues Licht auf das komplexe juristische Normenwerk dieser Regierungssysteme die als historisch gewachsene, Gegensätze überbrückende Gebilde relativ schwer durchleuchtbar sind. Eine Typologie soll dafür Orientierungshilfe leisten. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 49 (2 UL)
See detailThinking Borders and Border Thinking
Wille, Christian UL

Scientific Conference (2021, June 17)

Obwohl die Grenz- und Migrationsforschung große Überschneidungen aufweisen, unterscheiden sie sich z.B. hinsichtlich ihrer Erkenntnisinteressen und Theoretisierungen. Der Vortrag baut auf solchen ... [more ▼]

Obwohl die Grenz- und Migrationsforschung große Überschneidungen aufweisen, unterscheiden sie sich z.B. hinsichtlich ihrer Erkenntnisinteressen und Theoretisierungen. Der Vortrag baut auf solchen Gemeinsamkeiten und Unterschieden auf und zeigt zunächst die Verbindungen zwischen Grenz- und Migrationsforschung. Im zweiten Schritt werden aus Sicht der Grenzforschung verschiedene analytische Trends – insbesondere die komplexitätsorientierte Perspektive – und die damit verbundenen Grenzkonzepte vorgestellt. Abschließend werden die analytischen Trends mit der Methode „border thinking“ (Mignolo) in Zusammenhang gebracht und gefragt, inwiefern sie für die Migrationsforschung nützlich sein können. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 64 (0 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailScaling of urban heat island and nitrogen dioxide with urban population: a meta-analysis
Wei, Yufei UL; Caruso, Geoffrey UL; Lemoy, Rémi

Scientific Conference (2021, June 10)

Detailed reference viewed: 59 (12 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMeandering Identities: Affective Dialogues across Continents
Murdock, Elke UL; Campill, Marc-Antoine

Scientific Conference (2021, June 10)

One facet of contemporary societies is their increasingly divers composition. In terms of its demographic composition, Luxembourg can in fact be described as super-diverse. The foreign population ... [more ▼]

One facet of contemporary societies is their increasingly divers composition. In terms of its demographic composition, Luxembourg can in fact be described as super-diverse. The foreign population percentage stands at 47.5% and encloses migrants of different generation statuses and intentions to stay – ranging from a working day, to the length of a contract to permanence. Luxembourg is a trilingual country, with English and Portuguese being widely spoken as well. Luxembourg thus provides a rich context for identity construction. The majority of immigrants have European roots, but there is an increasing number of foreigners with a non-European background. We explored the identity-construction processes of eight Japanese women who had moved to Luxembourg. In particular, we were interested in the negotiation process or cultural dialogues these Japanese women engage in following their move to Luxembourg. Multicultural Luxembourg and homogenous Japan provide two very different cultural contexts and our aim was to understand if and how our subjects would engage in dialogues across continents. As noted by Hermans (2001) I positions create dialogical relations with each other by reorganizing themselves in flexible ways from one position to another due to its context-dependency. In our qualitative study we prompted context by providing three sets of visual stimuli. The first set comprised typical images of Luxembourg, the second matched images of Japan and in the third set we presented hybrid images – juxtaposing Japanese and European images. Especially the reactions to the last set of primes prompted a dialogical narration – dialogical interactions between different I positions. For the majority of our subjects we observed a harmonious or flexible flow of I positions within the self – a meandering between reference points and experiences in Japan and Luxembourg. Some ambivalence and disharmonious dialogues could also be observed. Examples for these affective dialogues across continents will be presented. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailInsights from a qualitative study of second-generation young Tamils growing up in Germany
Murdock, Elke UL; Mohanambal, Pavithraa

Scientific Conference (2021, June 03)

The aim of the study is to examine identity construal processes of young Tamils growing up in Germany. Their parents moved to Germany in the 80s fleeing conflict in Sri Lanka. Building on the theoretical ... [more ▼]

The aim of the study is to examine identity construal processes of young Tamils growing up in Germany. Their parents moved to Germany in the 80s fleeing conflict in Sri Lanka. Building on the theoretical framework on biculturalism developed by Yampolsky et al. (2013) we explored, using a qualitative approach, to what extent second-generation Tamils see themselves as a product of two cultures. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with ten participants (5 men and 5 women). All participants were born in Germany and completed schooling in Germany. All participants also attended Tamil schools and speak the Tamil language. Traditional Tamil values include making parents proud (collectivistic orientation), a conservative understanding of gender roles and emphasizing duty over joy. This is quite different to predominant values in Germany which is why we wanted to explore, how second-generation Tamils organize their cultural identities and what compromises they make in order to live up to cultural influences and expectations, focusing on the negotiation processes our participants engage in in navigating their cultural influences. The majority of our participants feel committed to both cultural influences and identify with both. We will show the different ways of compromise our participants have adopted. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 26 (0 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailSymposium: Looking back or forward? The cultural identity construction of immigrant youth.
Murdock, Elke UL; Albert, Isabelle UL; Maehler, Debora et al

Scientific Conference (2021, June 03)

This symposium pursues cultural identity formation (in terms of identifications with country of origin and country of residence) of immigrant youth using different methods. We will start with a literature ... [more ▼]

This symposium pursues cultural identity formation (in terms of identifications with country of origin and country of residence) of immigrant youth using different methods. We will start with a literature review on previous findings on cultural identification of first-generation immigrant youth worldwide, zoom in closer by looking on identity transmission processes between generations and finishing off with individual-level findings on identity construction by second-generation immigrants. First, results from a meta-analysis will be presented which investigated core factors affecting identity development among first-generation youth. The meta-analysis summarized which individual and context related factors predict cultural identity formation. The second study, employing a quantitative design, focuses on the cultural identity processes and dynamics of change between first-generation immigrant parents and their children (second generation) in a heterogeneous European country context - Luxemburg. The third study employs a qualitative design focusing on identity negotiation processes of young second generation immigrants growing up in Germany. Young Tamils were interviewed, exploring the cultural navigation processes in-depth. Findings across the studies and approaches indicate moderate to strong identifications with both, the country of origin and country of residence. The drivers for each outcome will be discussed. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 26 (1 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailReplicating the Kinora: 3D modelling and printing as heuristics in digital media history
van der Heijden, Tim UL; Wolf, Claude UL

Scientific Conference (2021, June 02)

This presentation reflects on the Kinora replica project, an interdisciplinary collaboration between the Luxembourg Centre for Contemporary and Digital History (C2DH) and the Department of Engineering ... [more ▼]

This presentation reflects on the Kinora replica project, an interdisciplinary collaboration between the Luxembourg Centre for Contemporary and Digital History (C2DH) and the Department of Engineering (DoE) of the University of Luxembourg. Combining historical inquiry with a hands-on and technical approach – involving the latest 3D modelling and desktop additive manufacturing engineering techniques – it provides insights into the process of making a working replica of the Kinora motion picture technology from the early 1900s. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 52 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMultiple Trajectory Analysis in Finite Mixture Modeling
Noel, Cédric UL; Schiltz, Jang UL

Scientific Conference (2021, June 02)

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailChannel Modeling and Analysis of Reconfigurable Intelligent Surfaces Assisted Vehicular Networks
Kong, Long UL; He, Jiguang; Ai, Yun et al

Scientific Conference (2021, June)

Detailed reference viewed: 65 (4 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSymposium: Contextual and life-course determinants of later-life cognitive functioning and dementia
Leist, Anja UL; Muniz-Terrera, Graciela

Scientific Conference (2021, June)

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA design strategy for phase synchronization in Precoding-enabled DVB-S2X user terminals
Martinez Marrero, Liz UL; Merlano Duncan, Juan Carlos UL; Querol, Jorge UL et al

Scientific Conference (2021, June)

This paper address the design of a phase tracking block for the DVB-S2X user terminals in a satellite precoding system. The spectral characteristics of the phase noise introduced by the oscillator, the ... [more ▼]

This paper address the design of a phase tracking block for the DVB-S2X user terminals in a satellite precoding system. The spectral characteristics of the phase noise introduced by the oscillator, the channel, and the thermal noise at the receiver are taken into account. Using the expected phase noise mask, the optimal parameters for a second-order PLL intended to track channel variations from the pilots are calculated. To validate the results a Simulink model was implemented considering the characteristics of the hardware prototype. The performance of the design was evaluated in terms of the accuracy and stability for the frame structure of superframe Format 2, as described in Annex E of DVB-S2X. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 87 (5 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailTypes of health-related behaviours: a cluster analysis of the Luxembourgish HBSC data
Heinz, Andreas UL; Willems, Helmut Erich UL; van Duin, Claire UL et al

Scientific Conference (2021, June)

Background: Although it is known that health behaviours, socio-demographic variables and outcomes correlate, it is rarely investigated if there are typical patterns of these variables among the research ... [more ▼]

Background: Although it is known that health behaviours, socio-demographic variables and outcomes correlate, it is rarely investigated if there are typical patterns of these variables among the research subjects. Objectives: To find out whether the students can be divided into distinct groups based on their health behaviour and whether these groups differ in other ways (outcomes and socio-demographics). Method: In step 1, a hierarchical cluster analysis was carried out to determine the number of groups and to identify the cluster centres. In step 2, this information was entered as the initial values of a cluster centre analysis. In step 3, the clusters were characterised using additional variables. Results: The 8065 students surveyed could be divided into 5 distinct groups based on their data on smoking, drinking, soft drinks, exercising, fighting and bullying, with cluster 1 and cluster 5 representing the strongest contrast. Cluster 1 comprises students whose health behaviour is generally positive. It is the largest cluster with 49.5% of students. Cluster 5 comprises students whose behaviour is consistently negative. It is the smallest cluster with 7.1% of students. Students in cluster 2 are close to average on many variables, but their dental health is problematic because they frequently consume soft drinks and rarely brush their teeth. Students in cluster 3 are physically inactive, their mental health is poor, but they are also rarely injured. The students in cluster 4 stand out because of their aggressive behaviour. Conclusion: With the help of cluster analysis, it is possible to categorise the students into a small number of groups based on their health behaviour. These groups are coherent in terms of health behaviour, many outcome variables and socio-demographic variables. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 39 (2 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailAnalgesic effects of interacting with a VR game and associated psychophysiological responses
Holl, Elisabeth UL; Rischer, Katharina Miriam UL

Scientific Conference (2021, June)

Introduction: Virtual reality (VR) has been shown to be an effective tool for pain distraction by redirecting attention away from painful stimuli. Although VR therapy has been successfully implemented in ... [more ▼]

Introduction: Virtual reality (VR) has been shown to be an effective tool for pain distraction by redirecting attention away from painful stimuli. Although VR therapy has been successfully implemented in clinical settings, little is known about the underlying factors that modulate analgesic responses, such as cognitive load, executive functions and VR or gaming experience. Methods: A final sample of N = 90 healthy participants played the VR game Subnautica in a high and a low cognitive load condition. In the low load condition, participants explored the VR along a predefined route. In the high load condition, participants had to additionally memorize eight digits presented along the route. Pain heat thresholds as well as psychophysiological measures (ECG, EDA) were recorded during a non-interactive resting state period prior to playing as well as during the two VR sessions. Furthermore, participants completed questionnaires (e.g., pain attitude) and executive functioning tasks (e.g., go/nogo task). Results: Pain thresholds did not differ for high versus low demand. However, participants achieved higher threshold for the interactive playing sessions compared to the resting state period. Psychophysiological markers (e.g., HRV) indicate lower sympathetic activity during the resting state compared to the playing session (resting state < low load < high load). Moreover, pain catastrophizing and fear of pain were significant predictors of pain thresholds. Discussion: Results shed light on the role of inter-individual differences and psychophysiological markers of VR-based pain sensitivity and indicate factors that facilitate/impair distraction effects. This may have important implication for the use of VR-therapy. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailBroadband Non-Geostationary Satellite Communication Systems: Research Challenges and Key Opportunities
Al-Hraishawi, Hayder UL; Chatzinotas, Symeon UL; Ottersten, Björn UL

Scientific Conference (2021, June)

Besides conventional geostationary (GSO) satellite broadband communication services, non-geostationary (NGSO) satellites are envisioned to support various new communication use cases from countless ... [more ▼]

Besides conventional geostationary (GSO) satellite broadband communication services, non-geostationary (NGSO) satellites are envisioned to support various new communication use cases from countless industries. These new scenarios bring many unprecedented challenges that will be discussed in this paper alongside with several potential future research opportunities. NGSO systems are known for various advantages, including their important features of low cost, lower propagation delay, smaller size, and lower losses in comparison to GSO satellites. However, there are still many deployment challenges to be tackled to ensure seamless integration not only with GSO systems but also with terrestrial networks. In this paper, we discuss several key challenges including satellite constellation and architecture designs, coexistence with GSO systems in terms of spectrum access and regulatory issues, resource management algorithms, and NGSO networking requirements. Additionally, the latest progress in provisioning secure communication via NGSO systems is discussed. Finally, this paper identifies multiple important open issues and research directions to inspire further studies towards the next generation of satellite networks. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailInequality of educational opportunity differentially impacts women’s and men’s later-life cognitive performance
Leist, Anja UL; Bar-Haim; Chauvel, Louis UL

Scientific Conference (2021, June)

Find the published paper here: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ssmph.2021.100837

Detailed reference viewed: 30 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailExploiting Jamming Attacks for Energy Harvesting in Massive MIMO Systems
Al-Hraishawi, Hayder UL; Chatzinotas, Symeon UL; Ottersten, Björn UL

Scientific Conference (2021, June)

In this paper, the performance of an RF energy harvesting scheme for multi-user massive multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) is investigated in the presence of multiple active jammers. The key idea is to ... [more ▼]

In this paper, the performance of an RF energy harvesting scheme for multi-user massive multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) is investigated in the presence of multiple active jammers. The key idea is to exploit the jamming transmissions as an energy source to be harvested at the legitimate users. To this end, the achievable uplink sum rate expressions are derived in closed-form for two different antenna configurations. An optimal time-switching policy is also proposed to ensure user-fairness in terms of both harvested energy and achievable rate. Besides, the essential trade-off between the harvested energy and achievable sum rate are quantified in closed-form. Our analysis reveals that the massive MIMO systems can make use of RF signals of the jamming attacks for boosting the amount of harvested energy at the served users. Numerical results illustrate the effectiveness of the derived closed-form expressions over Monte-Carlo simulations. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 26 (1 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailScaling of urban heat island & NO2 with urban population: a meta-analysis
Wei, Yufei UL; Caruso, Geoffrey UL; Lemoy, Rémi

Scientific Conference (2021, May 28)

Detailed reference viewed: 198 (9 UL)
Full Text
See detailFirst results of the iterative STEAM design process in 3D modelling and printing with pre-service teachers
Kreis, Yves UL; Haas, Ben; Lavicza, Zsolt

Scientific Conference (2021, May 28)

While we examined mathematical modelling of architectures with CAD software during the last years, we intended in our higher education courses in pre-service elementary school teachers' initial training ... [more ▼]

While we examined mathematical modelling of architectures with CAD software during the last years, we intended in our higher education courses in pre-service elementary school teachers' initial training to expand the complexity of the modelling tasks. In addition, our previous research results indicated a high difference between the quality and functionality of designs by students. Therefore, we investigated the design process in 3D modelling and printing. Based on the industrial iterative design process (e.g., design of a pen), we became aware of the importance of iterative process milestones, quality controls, discussions and peer evaluations. Therefore, we created a remote teaching course for pre-service teachers to design complex objects (e.g., functionality) and create learning settings and tasks based on an iterative design process concept. We will present the first results and reflections at this conference. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (7 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMetadiscourse by native and non-native English speakers: importance marking in lectures
Deroey, Katrien UL; Johnson, Jane Helen

Scientific Conference (2021, May 27)

This talk has a dual purpose. In addition to mapping the use of one type of metadiscourse, viz. importance markers, across ‘native’ and ‘English Medium Instruction’ (EMI) lecture corpora, we elaborate on ... [more ▼]

This talk has a dual purpose. In addition to mapping the use of one type of metadiscourse, viz. importance markers, across ‘native’ and ‘English Medium Instruction’ (EMI) lecture corpora, we elaborate on analytical issues related to studying metadiscourse in spoken and disciplinary discourse. ‘Importance markers’ (Deroey & Taverniers, 2012) are lexicogrammatical metadiscursive devices combining discourse organization with evaluation along a ‘parameter of importance or relevance’ (Thompson and Hunston, 2000, p. 24). In lectures, they help students identify key content, which is useful for allocating processing resources while listening to what are typically dense monologues that require processing in real time. This in turns is likely to benefit understanding, note-taking and retention. Comparing the use of importance markers in a single-discipline corpus of engineering lectures by ‘native’ speakers and EMI lecturers, our aim was to contribute to the limited insights into the linguistic features of EMI lecture discourse generally and metadiscourse important for lecture discourse organization and hence lecture listening, specifically. Both researchers independently identified potential importance markers manually in lectures 46 engineering lectures (364,542 words) delivered in the Italy, Malaysia, the UK, and New Zealand,. Agreed instances were tagged and the tagged corpus imported into Sketch Engine to facilitate further analysis. Overall, native speakers and EMI lecturers differed little in importance marker frequency, range, types, and lexemes. In both corpora, the predominant verb marker was V n/clause (e.g. remember they don't know each other). The main difference was the far more common use of the listener-oriented 2 pers pron V n/clause marker (you must understand how to apply this one) by the non-native speakers but this was largely due to idiolectic variation. Contrary to most corpus linguistic metadiscourse studies, we report the inevitable analytical difficulties when identifying and classifying metadiscourse. Issues include establishing a definition that is broad enough to capture the various realizations of a metadiscursive function, while not ‘opening the floodgates’ to include instances that are not representative or that render the study unfeasible. For us this included distinguishing between evaluation of discourse and ‘real world’ entities, excluding very frequent phrases that could be viewed as importance markers but in this discipline probably served another function, and establishing a continuum of highlighting ‘force’. These considerations necessitated careful manual analysis of a relatively small corpus, which however means that generalization are limited and idiolectic bias more likely. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 41 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDevelopment of knowledge and subjectivity by analysis of teacher-movies
Weber, Jean-Marie UL

Scientific Conference (2021, May 22)

Detailed reference viewed: 14 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLinking Executive Functions and Math Intelligence in Preschool Children: A Meta-Analysis
Emslander, Valentin UL; Scherer, Ronny

Scientific Conference (2021, May 20)

Background: Executive functions (i.e., response inhibition, attention shifting, working memory updating) have shown to be related to the mathematical component of intelligence, which, in turn, is ... [more ▼]

Background: Executive functions (i.e., response inhibition, attention shifting, working memory updating) have shown to be related to the mathematical component of intelligence, which, in turn, is predictive of various competences later in life. While this relation has already been thoroughly researched in school students and adults, a comprehensive research synthesis on preschool children—a group for which the assessment of these constructs is more challenging—is still missing. Evidence on the differentiation of cognitive skills over time suggests a differential relation of the three executive functions with math intelligence in older but not in younger children. It remains unclear, however, whether and which one of the three executive functions is more closely related to math intelligence in preschool children. Further research gaps concern the measurement of both executive functions and math intelligence in preschool children, as they cannot complete reading- and writing-based questionnaires. Addressing this measurement challenge, a plethora of inventive measurements has been used to assess both cognitive skills. These measurement differences might also have an influence on the relation between executive functions and math intelligence. Objectives: With our meta-analysis, we aimed to clarify the relation between executive functions and math intelligence in preschool children. Further, we wanted to investigate the influence of different measurement methods on this relation and look into the specific links of inhibition, shifting, and updating with math intelligence more closely. Research questions: 1. To what extent are inhibition, shifting, and updating (as a composite and separately) related to math intelligence in preschool children? (Overall correlations) 2. Which sample, study, and measurement characteristics moderate this relation? (Heterogeneity and moderators) 3. How much variation in math intelligence do inhibition, shifting, and updating explain jointly? (Model testing) Methods: We examined the relation between executive functions and math intelligence for 268 effect sizes from 29 studies for a total sample of 25,510 preschool children. Specifically, we synthesized the corresponding correlations by means of three-level random-effects meta-analyses (RQ 1) and examined the study, sample, and measurement characteristics as possible moderators of this relation between EFs and math intelligence via mixed-effects modeling (RQ 2). Further, we performed meta-analytic structural equation modeling to investigate the joint and differential effects inhibition, shifting, and updating on math intelligence (RQ 3). Results: We found executive functions and math intelligence to correlate moderately in preschool children (r = .35). Investigating inhibition, shifting, and updating separately also revealed moderate average correlations to math intelligence (r = .30, r = .38 , and r = .36, respectively). While we did not find age to explain significant amounts of heterogeneity, four measurement characteristics moderated the relation between executive function and math intelligence. When considered jointly through meta-analytic structural equation modeling, the relations of inhibition, shifting, and updating to math intelligence were similar. Conclusions and Implications: By presenting evidence for a significant relation between executive functions and math intelligence also in preschool children, our findings contribute to the discussion on the differentiation of cognitive skills. They highlight the importance of considering measurement characteristics when researching executive functions and math intelligence. Further, we could not confirm that inhibition, shifting, and updating are differentially related to math intelligence. Further research is needed to clarify the impact of age on the relation between executive functions and math intelligence. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (2 UL)
See detailTable ronde : comment faire réseau autour des archives du web ?
Schafer, Valerie UL

Scientific Conference (2021, May 17)

Table ronde : comment faire réseau autour des archives du web ? Intervenants : Emmanuelle Bermès (Bibliothèque nationale de France), Dominique Cardon (medialab, Sciences Po), Stéphanie Groudiev (Campus ... [more ▼]

Table ronde : comment faire réseau autour des archives du web ? Intervenants : Emmanuelle Bermès (Bibliothèque nationale de France), Dominique Cardon (medialab, Sciences Po), Stéphanie Groudiev (Campus Condorcet), Valérie Schafer (Université du Luxembourg) [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (2 UL)
See detailDigital Cultural Heritage and the Politics of Digitisation
Zaagsma, Gerben UL

Scientific Conference (2021, May 11)

This talk deals with a question that is becoming increasingly important for historians who work with digitised cultural heritage: what are the politics of digitisation and what are its implications for ... [more ▼]

This talk deals with a question that is becoming increasingly important for historians who work with digitised cultural heritage: what are the politics of digitisation and what are its implications for historical research? Is the often-lauded democratising potential of digitisation also offset by challenges, inherent in selection processes that might privilege the digitisation of heritage corresponding to existing national master narratives, the availability of funding and/or the priorities set by cultural policies and certain research agendas? How does transnational heritage fit into this picture when most digitisation projects are, in one way or another, nationally framed? What biases can digital archives introduce in our work and how does that differ from issues of bias and selection in the ‘paper’ archive? A key point to highlight is that professional historians can and should be more open to learn from the experience of digital archivists and librarians who are at the forefront of the digital turn in heritage wsk. the talk will conclude with a brief plea and suggestion for transparancy guidelines for digital resources. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 48 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMultiple vulnerabilities: The effects of neighborhood structural changes upon older residents' mental health and perceptions of the broader community
Settels, Jason UL

Scientific Conference (2021, May 06)

Aims: Neighborhoods’ structural conditions are consequential for their social circumstances and residents’ well-being. Neighborhood effects might be accentuated among older residents because their daily ... [more ▼]

Aims: Neighborhoods’ structural conditions are consequential for their social circumstances and residents’ well-being. Neighborhood effects might be accentuated among older residents because their daily activities and social lives are more confined to their immediate communities. This study examines how changing neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage affects older residents’ depression and stress, as well as perceptions of neighborhood context. Methods: This study employed waves 2 (2010-2011) and 3 (2015-2016) of the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project survey (N=2,357) and fixed-effects linear regression models to study these relationships. Results: While rising neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage was associated with more depression and stress, it was negatively associated with overall neighborhood social capital and neighborhood social cohesion, and was only associated with lower perceptions of neighborhood safety among respondents who relocated to new neighborhoods. Conclusions: Beyond cross-sectional associations, changing neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage is associated with changes in mental health and perceptions of neighborhood social context. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 44 (1 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailOffice Agents: Personal Office Vitality Sensors with Intent
Stamhuis, Sjoerd; Brombacher, Hans; Vos, Steven et al

Scientific Conference (2021, May)

In smart office buildings, almost every aspect of the environment can be assessed and adjusted by sensors. Yet employees rarely have access to the data collected to act upon it. It is also unclear what ... [more ▼]

In smart office buildings, almost every aspect of the environment can be assessed and adjusted by sensors. Yet employees rarely have access to the data collected to act upon it. It is also unclear what they would find meaningful to follow the recommendations on healthy work conditions and behavior, while productivity is the priority. The Office Agents are a set of artefacts placed on the employee’s desk, which capture data about the office environment. Air quality, sound level, light exposure, productivity, and physical activity level are measured to provide office workers with feedback on the ‘best’ working conditions. Using speculative design and Objects with Intent, the employee engages in a negotiation with the Office Agents based on the office ecosystem. Through this project and interactivity session, we open a debate on the use of sensors in office environments and the stakes around office vitality from the viewpoint of the employees. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 77 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe Hormones of Dark Souls: The Dark Tetrad and Violent Gaming Effects on Aggression, Cortisol and Testosterone Levels
Wagener, Gary; Felten, Andrea; Melzer, André UL

Scientific Conference (2021, May)

Although playing violent video games may lead to detrimental effects on cognition, emotion and behavior, the role of hormones and its interplay with personality characteristics is not well understood. An ... [more ▼]

Although playing violent video games may lead to detrimental effects on cognition, emotion and behavior, the role of hormones and its interplay with personality characteristics is not well understood. An experimental study tested how playing a violent versus non-violent video game affects cortisol and testosterone levels, whether these hormonal changes increase implicit aggressive cognition, and whether Dark Tetrad personality traits moderate these effects. In an experimental design, 54 male participants played either a violent or a non-violent video game. Participants provided salivary samples at the beginning of the experiment (T1), right after 25 minutes of gameplay (T2), and 20 minutes after that (T3). There were no significant effects on implicit aggressive cognition. However, participants in the violent game condition had a significant decrease in cortisol levels (T1 to T2) and a significant negative trend in cortisol levels from T1 to T3. Participants with higher Machiavellianism scores in the violent condition had a stronger decrease in cortisol (T1 to T2). In contrast, participants with higher Machiavellianism scores in the non-violent condition had a higher increase in cortisol (T1 to T2). The present findings illustrate the complex interplay between personality, hormones, and game content, thus specifying current notions on violent game effects. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 196 (0 UL)
Full Text
See detailThe impact of COVID-19 in the migration area in EU and OECD countries
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL; Sheridan, Anne

Scientific Conference (2021, April 30)

The European Migration Network (EMN) and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) have published updated information on the impact of COVID-19 in the migration area. The new ... [more ▼]

The European Migration Network (EMN) and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) have published updated information on the impact of COVID-19 in the migration area. The new Umbrella Inform completes the joint EMN and OECD Inform series between on the impact of COVID-19 on migration and asylum in the EU Member States and non-EU OECD countries throughout 2020. Updates include changes in border procedures, provision of COVID-19 related healthcare services to migrants, the shifting landscape of the labour market, international protection, international students, and return issues. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 53 (0 UL)
See detailSoziale Kohäsion und Exklusion im luxemburgischen Wohnungswesen
Dujardin, Céline UL

Scientific Conference (2021, April 23)

Kontext und Problematik Im Großherzogtum Luxemburg ist die Nachfrage an bezahlbarem Wohnraum deutlich höher als das bestehende Angebot (Manet, 2017; Reuter, 2017). Für die finanziell benachteiligten ... [more ▼]

Kontext und Problematik Im Großherzogtum Luxemburg ist die Nachfrage an bezahlbarem Wohnraum deutlich höher als das bestehende Angebot (Manet, 2017; Reuter, 2017). Für die finanziell benachteiligten Haushalte stellen die Wohnkosten von ungefähr 40% des verfügbaren Budgets eine wesentliche und sehr hohe Ausgabe dar. Generell kann sogar eine Verschärfung des Armutsrisikos durch die Wohnkosten beobachtet werden (Ametepe, 2019). Die luxemburgische Bevölkerung setzt sich aus den folgenden Nationalitäten zusammen: 52,5% Luxemburger, wobei etwas mehr als eine Person von 10 eine doppelte Staatsangehörigkeit besitzt und 40,1% Nationalitäten aus den weiteren 27 EU-Mitgliedsstaaten, wobei 15,6% Portugiesen den größten Anteil darstellen (Klein & Peltier, 2019). Antworten und Herausforderungen der Sozialen Arbeit Der wahrscheinlich größte Anteil der Obdachlosenhilfe besteht europaweit aus niederschwelligen Dienstleistungen, die grundlegende Unterstützung außerhalb des Wohnungswesens bieten oder aus der Bereitstellung von Notfallunterkunft/vorübergehender Unterbringung. Im Gegensatz dazu sind Dienste, die obdachlosen Menschen sofort ein dauerhaftes Zuhause bieten, in den meisten Ländern nur bis zu einem gewissen Grad präsent (Pleace, Baptista, Benjaminsen & Busch-Geertsema, 2018). In Anlehnung an die bestehenden Vergleichsstudien des European Observatory on Homelessness sowie an die europäische Typologie für Wohnungslosigkeit ETHOS wird auch das entsprechende Handlungsfeld der Sozialen Arbeit in Luxemburg durchleuchtet. Anhand dieser Darstellung folgt eine Diskussion über die bestehenden Herausforderungen für Wissenschaft, Politik und Praxis. Diskussion und Ausblick Soziale Kohäsion wird gerne als Zielsetzung und Antwort auf die Problematiken des luxemburgischen Wohnungswesens aufgeführt. Nach Habermeier (2005) umfasst die soziale Kohäsion den Ist-Zustand des Zusammenhalts einer Gemeinschaft – von der Paarbeziehung bis zur Gesamtgesellschaft – und nicht seine Entstehung. Die soziale Kohäsion als Ziel hingegen ist ein Soll-Zustand, der mehrere Fragen aufwirft, z.B. ob soziale Kohäsion planbar ist oder sich verstärken lässt, ob sie immer ein theoretischer Idealtyp der Gesellschaft bleibt oder ob die Soziale Arbeit soziale Kohäsion unterstützen kann ohne ihre Klienten in ein Abhängigkeitsverhältnis zu setzen. Bibliographie Ametepe, F. (2019). Le logement, amplificateur des inégalités au Luxembourg. Regards, 18(8). Disponible sous : https://statistiques.public.lu/catalogue-publications/regards/2019/PDF-18-2019.pdf Habermeier, R. (2005). Soziale Kohäsion. Hitotsubashi Journal of Social Studies, 37(1), 1-17. Klein, C. & Peltier, F. (2019). 93% de la population luxembourgeoise sont des ressortissants de l’UE-28. Regards, 7(5). Disponible sous : https://statistiques.public.lu/catalogue-publications/regards/2019/PDF-07-2019.pdf Manet, B. (2017). Schlimmer als die Bewerbung für einen Job? Die Facebook-WG-colocation-à louer-Welt Luxemburgs. Forum für Politik, Gesellschaft und Kultur, 372, 31. Pleace, N., Baptista, I., Benjaminsen, L. & Busch-Geertsema, V. (2018). Homelessness Services in Europe. EOH Comparative Studies on Homelessness. Brussels: European Observatory on Homelessness. Reuter, J.-P. (2017). Wohnst du schon oder suchst du noch? Über Schwierigkeiten adäquat wohnen zu dürfen und den Versuch Lösungen zu finden. Forum für Politik, Gesellschaft und Kultur, 372, 24-26. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 52 (9 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailGender Diversity Practices in Talent Management: An Exploratory Study in the Space Industry in Luxembourg
Usanova, Ksenia UL

Scientific Conference (2021, April 22)

This study contributes to the conceptual and empirical understanding of how gender diversity management (GDM) is integrated into talent management (TM). Following the grounded theory, we interviewed 40 HR ... [more ▼]

This study contributes to the conceptual and empirical understanding of how gender diversity management (GDM) is integrated into talent management (TM). Following the grounded theory, we interviewed 40 HR managers and talents from the space industry in Luxembourg. We provide a nuanced picture of what attitude on the GDM in TM organizations have, what strategies and practices they conduct, and how they differ from each other. Based on these differences, we developed three types of GDM integration to TM and explained the talents’ view on this issue. This study is the first empirical investigation of GDM in TM in the space industry that integrates both: the TM executives’ and TM receivers’ views on gender equality in TM. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 66 (0 UL)
See detailResults of the project TRANSLA
Aleksic, Gabrijela UL; Bebić-Crestany, Džoen Dominique UL

Scientific Conference (2021, April 21)

In this Conference, we presented the the results from the project TRANSLA, with the focus on the teachers. According to the results from the questionnaires that were administered before and after the ... [more ▼]

In this Conference, we presented the the results from the project TRANSLA, with the focus on the teachers. According to the results from the questionnaires that were administered before and after the professional development course in translanguaging pedagogy, there was a significant increase in teachers' positive attitudes towards multilingualism and the use of children's home languages, and a significant decrease of focus on Luxembourgish only, after the course. The focus groups before and after the course and the interviews after the course showed that there was a raise of awareness of the link between implementation of home languages and children's well-being, positive change in deficit perspective of children, and positive change in attitudes (however, for some still firm monolingual stance). Finally, the teachers shared that there was a positive change in their practice (however, for some too time-consuming). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 32 (2 UL)
See detailStudying transnational events through web archives
Schafer, Valerie UL

Scientific Conference (2021, April 20)

This short presentation was a mid-term feedback on the collective work of WG2 that I lead within the WARCnet project. I especially underlined the research we conducted through an internal datathon we ... [more ▼]

This short presentation was a mid-term feedback on the collective work of WG2 that I lead within the WARCnet project. I especially underlined the research we conducted through an internal datathon we organised in January 2021 and which used seed lists, derived data and metadata. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 43 (1 UL)
See detailPresenter: Peripheries at the Centre: Borderland Schooling in Interwar Europe
Venken, Machteld UL

Scientific Conference (2021, April 17)

Detailed reference viewed: 32 (0 UL)
See detailPanel Organiser: Peripheries at the Centre: Borderland Schooling in Interwar Europe
Venken, Machteld UL

Scientific Conference (2021, April 17)

Detailed reference viewed: 32 (4 UL)
Full Text
See detailThird-country National Labour Workers' Mobility to and inside Europe during the COVID-19 Pandemic
Nienaber, Birte UL; Sommarribas, Adolfo UL

Scientific Conference (2021, April 15)

This presentation analyses the situation generated by the Covid-19 pandemic crisis regarding border closures and the reintroduction of temporary border controls at the internal borders in the EU and the ... [more ▼]

This presentation analyses the situation generated by the Covid-19 pandemic crisis regarding border closures and the reintroduction of temporary border controls at the internal borders in the EU and the impact that this border closures and the pandemic had on third-country nationals living or visiting the European Union. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMapping citizens’ reflections and perceptions of place-based experiences in the time of COVID-19
Jones, Catherine UL

Scientific Conference (2021, April 14)

Using a Citizen Science Approach, the ZesummenMaps project explores the emergent spatial interactions of our towns, cities and rural areas that arise from the COVID-19 pandemic and social distancing and ... [more ▼]

Using a Citizen Science Approach, the ZesummenMaps project explores the emergent spatial interactions of our towns, cities and rural areas that arise from the COVID-19 pandemic and social distancing and confinement policies in Luxembourg and the Greater Region. Citizens (residents, students, cross-border workers) reflect on their personal experiences of place during the crises. They contribute thoughts and perceptions through a collaborative community-mapping interface. This provides a foundation to explore, evaluate and understand the evolving perceptions and uses of public spaces, infrastructures and physical environments. Thus, creating an evidence-base of emerging spatial interactions to inform understanding of the impact of the "bleift doheem" policy (stay at home, confinement, lockdown) related to our perceptions and uses of our towns, cities and rural areas. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 48 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDesigning EMI lecturer training programmes: what and how
Deroey, Katrien UL

Scientific Conference (2021, April 08)

This workshop will provide insights into designing and delivering English Medium Instruction (EMI) lecturer training. Although universities have been slow to organize EMI lecturer support, an increasing ... [more ▼]

This workshop will provide insights into designing and delivering English Medium Instruction (EMI) lecturer training. Although universities have been slow to organize EMI lecturer support, an increasing awareness of the challenges faced by EMI lecturers and their students now appears to be boosting the demand for EMI lecturer training and support initiatives. Consequently, EAP practitioners can increasingly expect requests to design and deliver such programmes. However, the efficient design and delivery of EMI lecturing training and support is a complex challenge. First, the EMI context is very varied and initiatives should be adapted to the local cultural, educational, linguistic and institutional contexts (Herington, 2020; Martinez & Fernandes, 2020; Tuomainen, 2018). Second, most literature highlights the need for language, pedagogical and intercultural components (e.g. Fortanet Gómez, 2020). Third, we need to be sensitive to lecturers’ attitudes towards EMI and EMI training (Tsui, 2018). Fourth, there are practical considerations such as the timely provision of support (Guarda & Helm, 2017), promoting participation, facilitating learning transfer to lectures, and optimizing the support in view of what are often heterogeneous participant groups in terms of English proficiency, (EMI) lecturing experience and discipline (Ball & Lindsay, 2013). Finally, the design of these programmes typically needs to happen with very limited institutional resources, few (if any) published materials and relatively little published research on lecture discourse and EMI lecturer training. The workshop will start with an overview of published training initiatives with their reported successes and challenges (Deroey, 2021). Next, participants will work in small groups, brainstorming ideas for an EMI support programme based on a brief we have recently received at the multilingual University of Luxembourg Language Centre. Finally, these proposals will be discussed in the whole group and key ideas summarized to consolidate the insights gained. Ball, P., & Lindsay, D. (2013). Language demands and support for English-medium instruction in tertiary education. Learning from a specific context In A. Doiz, D. Lasagabaster, & J. M. Sierra (Eds.), English-medium instruction at universities: Global challenges (pp. 44-61). Bristol: Multilingual Matters. -Deroey, K. L. B. (2021). Lecturer training for English Medium Instruction: what and how? In B. D. Bond, A. & M. Evans (Ed.), Innovation, exploration and transformation. Proceedings of the 2019 BALEAP Conference. Reading: Garnet. -Fortanet Gómez, I. (2020). The dimensions of EMI in the international classroom: training teachers for the future university. In M. Del Mar Sánchez-Pérez (Ed.), Teacher training for English-medium instruction in higher education (pp. 1-20). Hershey: IGI Global. -Guarda, M., & Helm, F. (2017). A survey of lecturers’ needs and feedback on EMI training. In K. Ackerley, M. Guarda, & F. Helm (Eds.), Sharing perspectives on English-medium instruction (pp. 167-194). Bern: Peter Lang. -Herington, R. (2020). Observation as a tool to facilitate the professional development of teaching faculty involved in English as a Medium of Instruction: trainer and trainee perspectives. In M. L. Carrió-Pasto (Ed.), Internationalising Learning in Higher Education (pp. 65-82). Hershey: IGI Global. -Martinez, R., & Fernandes, K. (2020). Development of a teacher training course for English medium instruction for higher education professors in Brazil. In M. Del Mar Sánchez-Pérez (Ed.), Teacher Training for English-Medium Instruction in Higher Education (pp. 125-152). Hershey: IGI Global. -Tuomainen, S. (2018). Supporting non-native university lecturers with English-medium instruction. Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education. 10(3), 230-242. -Tsui, C. (2018). Teacher efficacy: a case study of faculty beliefs in an English-medium instruction teacher training program. Taiwan Journal of TESOL, 15(1), 101-128. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 57 (0 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailSocial Inequality in Education: Academic Achievement of First-, Second-, and Later-Generation Immigrant Students in Luxembourg
Rivas, Salvador UL; Reichel, Yanica UL; Krämer, Charlotte UL et al

Scientific Conference (2021, April 08)

Students with immigrant backgrounds are often disadvantaged in public educational systems. In Luxembourg, about 50% of primary and secondary school students have an immigrant background, most notably from ... [more ▼]

Students with immigrant backgrounds are often disadvantaged in public educational systems. In Luxembourg, about 50% of primary and secondary school students have an immigrant background, most notably from Italy, the former Yugoslavia and Portugal. Using data from Luxembourg’s national school monitoring program, we investigate and document for the first time, existing and emerging differences in academic achievement among different immigrant generations of students. Our results indicate that student achievement in Math, German and French is differentially affected by immigrant generational status and language spoken at home. In addition, we find secondary effects of student social background. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 54 (14 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDesigning and managing an online, personalised research writing course for postgraduates
Deroey, Katrien UL; Skipp, Jennifer

Scientific Conference (2021, April 08)

This paper describes and evaluates an online research article writing course at the University of Luxembourg. Participants were self-referred PhD students from different disciplines. The aim of the ten ... [more ▼]

This paper describes and evaluates an online research article writing course at the University of Luxembourg. Participants were self-referred PhD students from different disciplines. The aim of the ten-week course is to improve insight into the structural, stylistic and rhetorical features of research articles as well as the writing and publication process. It also provides tools for students to develop their own writing. We will situate our course rationale and design within the literature, then compare these to both the reality of managing and delivering the course online as well as participants’ feedback as reflected in 30 surveys. We will focus on the following results: • The practicability of including multiple pedagogical elements in an online course was challenging. We wanted to integrate both independent and collaborative work, production and reflection. However, results of the surveys and our own experience show that the multiplicity of elements was often seen as complex and difficult to manage and multiple submission deadlines problematic. • Students favoured working alone over working together and uptake of writing groups (Aitchison, 2009) was poor. Multi-disciplinary peer groups were, however, positively reviewed (cf. Hyland, 2012). • The flexibility of the online environment was seen as positive, yet many reported problems finding time to write. However, participants did see the benefit in having to write regularly. Tools of reflection did not score highly. • The personalisation of learning input scored highly in the survey, but this was time-consuming to implement. Whilst instructor-student consultations were offered to further personalise feedback, these had a low uptake (8/30). • We wanted to create a course which included guidance on the writing and publication process (Starfield & Paltridge, 2016) as well as increased genre awareness (Swales, 1990) to prepare students for publication. However, tasks on language and structure were rated more useful by more students than this content. • More participants commented on the benefit of working through their language issues in live sessions over learning how to address language issues through the corpus-tools that were integrated into the course (Charles, 2018). Through sharing this information, we hope to generate a discussion with the audience about ways to optimise online writing courses and manage some of the problems associated with online delivery. Aitchison, C. (2009). Writing groups for doctoral education. Studies in Higher Education, 34(8), 905-916. Charles, M. (2018) Corpus-assisted editing for doctoral students: More than just concordancing. Journal of English for Academic Purposes, 36, 15-26. Charles, M. (2018). Using do-it-yourself-corpora in EAP: A tailor-made resource for teachers and students. Teaching English for Specific and Academic Purposes, 6(2), 217-224. Hyland, K. (2012). Disciplinary Identities: Individuality and Community in Academic Discourse. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Nesi, H. & Gardener, S. (2012). Genres across the disciplines: Student writing in higher education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Paltridge, B., & Starfield, S. (2016). Getting published in academic journals: Navigating the publication process. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press. Swales, J. (1990). Genre analysis: English in academic and research settings. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 54 (0 UL)
Full Text
See detailTransition from traditional to hybrid to online courses for pre-service elementary school teachers at the University of Luxembourg: STEAM integrated approach in the project MathEduc @ BScE
Kreis, Yves UL; Haas, Ben

Scientific Conference (2021, April 07)

During the past year, technology has started enabling new forms of teaching and learning in higher education in Luxemburg. Thus, to be able to work more closely with elementary school pre-service teachers ... [more ▼]

During the past year, technology has started enabling new forms of teaching and learning in higher education in Luxemburg. Thus, to be able to work more closely with elementary school pre-service teachers, we shifted our mathematics education course during the past years to flipped classroom approaches and worked with synchronous and asynchronous teaching on- and off-campus modes. Furthermore, due to the restrictions of the COVID-19 pandemic, we decided to shift our teaching to entirely online flipped classroom approaches together with outdoor mathematical trails with STEAM integrated assessments. This final shift to a fully online flipped classroom, with self-paced, student-centred teachings and learnings, showed strong positive effects on pre-service elementary school teachers in mathematics teaching. In this presentation, we will outline results of this transition period and describe results from different studies. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 78 (8 UL)
Full Text
See detailThe STEAM skilled child: How children can learn to apply STEAM skills to their living environment
Haas, Ben; Kreis, Yves UL; Lavicza, Zsolt

Scientific Conference (2021, April 01)

Detailed reference viewed: 44 (7 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailJoint Beam-Hopping Scheduling and Power Allocation in NOMA-Assisted Satellite Systems
Wang, Anyue UL; Lei, Lei UL; Lagunas, Eva UL et al

Scientific Conference (2021, March 31)

In this paper, we investigate potential synergies of non-orthogonal multiple access (NOMA) and beam hopping (BH) for multi-beam satellite systems. The coexistence of BH and NOMA provides time-power-domain ... [more ▼]

In this paper, we investigate potential synergies of non-orthogonal multiple access (NOMA) and beam hopping (BH) for multi-beam satellite systems. The coexistence of BH and NOMA provides time-power-domain flexibilities in mitigating a practical mismatch effect between offered capacity and requested traffic per beam. We formulate the joint BH scheduling and NOMA-based power allocation problem as mixed-integer nonconvex programming. We reveal the xponential-conic structure for the original problem, and reformulate the problem to the format of mixed-integer conic programming (MICP), where the optimum can be obtained by exponential-complexity algorithms. A greedy scheme is proposed to solve the problem on a timeslot-by-timeslot basis with polynomial-time complexity. Numerical results show the effectiveness of the proposed efficient suboptimal algorithm in reducing the matching error by 62.57% in average over the OMA scheme and achieving a good trade-off between computational complexity and performance compared to the optimal solution. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 68 (17 UL)
See detailTable Ronde «Zesumme mat de Kanner duerch Corono-Zaiten»
Kirsch, Claudine UL; Engel de Abreu, Pascale UL

Scientific Conference (2021, March 30)

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCan Iceland learn from Luxembourg? Understanding the host country perspective in an increasingly plural composed society
Murdock, Elke UL

Scientific Conference (2021, March 26)

Luxembourg and Iceland are very different In terms of geography, but both countries have experienced dramatic changes in terms of their population structure in recent years. With 41 immigrants per 1000 ... [more ▼]

Luxembourg and Iceland are very different In terms of geography, but both countries have experienced dramatic changes in terms of their population structure in recent years. With 41 immigrants per 1000 inhabitants, Luxembourg had the second highest number of immigrants per inhabitants in Europe in 2017 with Iceland, at 35.5, coming a close second. Since the 60s, Luxembourg’s population nearly doubled and today the foreign population percentage stands at 47.5%. Until the turn of the century, Iceland’s foreign population stood at around 2%, rising steadily over the last 20 years and today stands at 14.4% - having doubled in the last 10 years. Migration studies often focus on the immigrant perspective, but especially when numbers rise, the host country perspective is important. In Luxembourg, we conducted several studies into the attitude towards multiculturalism among the host society. The Inclusive Societies – Iceland project investigated both, the experience of immigrants to Iceland but also the attitude of the native population towards immigrants. Findings from this quantitative study covering 3630 native Icelanders (51.1% women, MAge = 50.8, SD = 15.6), spread across all regions of Iceland will be presented and parallels drawn with findings from Luxembourg. Particular focus will be placed on demographic variables, language, culture contact and citizenship influencing the attitude towards a diverse society. Understanding the attitudes towards immigrants and diversity ideologies held by the native population is important, as these will determine acculturation options open to immigrants. Implications will be discussed in light of empirical findings in Luxembourg and Iceland. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 90 (1 UL)
See detailMapping wartime Jewish diaries and their postwar trajectories
Zaagsma, Gerben UL

Scientific Conference (2021, March 26)

If Auschwitz has become the key symbol of the Holocaust, then the fate of Anne Frank and her family has become symbolic of Jewish wartime experiences in Nazi-occupied Europe, and Anne’s diaries of Jewish ... [more ▼]

If Auschwitz has become the key symbol of the Holocaust, then the fate of Anne Frank and her family has become symbolic of Jewish wartime experiences in Nazi-occupied Europe, and Anne’s diaries of Jewish diary writing. As such they are constitutive of people’s ideas about the Holocaust and the Jewish experience during World War II. Indeed, the Anne Frank diaries are intrinsic to the development of postwar Holocaust memory. Yet we know that the case of Anne Frank was far from representative, and insofar as scholars strive to recover the full range of Jewish wartime experiences, as filtered through autobiographical texts, this situation is obviously problematic. In contrast to Anne Frank and her diary, the ‘context of textual production’ (Garbarini 2014) for any Jew writing in Eastern Europe, in the very centre of the killings, could not be more different. As a result diary writing here diferred starkly in terms of both content and intent. This is particularly true for Yiddish diaries, which reflect the experiences of the poorest Jews in Eastern Europe. This paper focuses on wartime Jewish diaries from Poland. It is based mostly upon the collection of diaries from the Jewish Historical Institute in Warsaw, 75% of which are written in Polish and around 20% in Yiddish. Importantly, the collection’s inventory indicates both the locations were the writer is known to have been, as well as those locations which are mentioned in the diary, which of course do not necessarily overlap. As a result the collection’s metadata allow us to map several things: the spatio-linguistic distribution of wartime diaries and the areas covered by them; and the spread of news, as reflected by the locations covered by the diaries’ contents. Moreover, in addition to enabling the analysis of a wealth of contextual information, the inventory also lists known translation and/or publication data for each diary. As a result, we can get a glimpse in their postwar trajectories and analyse which diaries were published, where and at what time, and in which translations. This, in turn, can tell us much about the relation between translation and Holocaust memory since, as Naomi Seidman has argued (2006), “the canon of Holocaust literature should be read as the rewriting of this historical event for new audiences”. A final step would be to embed information from the diaries’ themselves, and the actual experiences that are conveyed, into the maps, thus creating a deep map which combines more factual information about the diaries with the subjective lived experiences contained within them. The project seeks to contribute to a more balanced understanding of wartime Jewish diaries and writing during WWII in Nazi-occupied Eastern Europe, though the prism of a specific collection. The broader aim of the paper is to provide an example of the type of new spatio-temporal insights that can be gleaned from collections’ metadata, in addition to ‘traditional’ textual content analysis. The project uses Nodegoat (nodegoat.net) as a way to manage, explore and visualise the data. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (0 UL)
Full Text
See detailThe role of European Migration Network in supporting European migration policymakers: Mechanisms, Tools and contemporary challenges
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL

Scientific Conference (2021, March 26)

The role of the EMN in the collection of information to provide timely, comparable information to EU and national policymakers.

Detailed reference viewed: 79 (1 UL)
Full Text
See detailMixed-methods research in STEAM outdoor trails in elementary school pre-service teacher training
Haas, Ben; Kreis, Yves UL; Lavicza, Zsolt

Scientific Conference (2021, March 25)

Detailed reference viewed: 89 (4 UL)
See detailDie Burg in St. Vith - Eine typisch „sponheimische“ Anlage?
Uhrmacher, Martin UL

Scientific Conference (2021, March 25)

Der Vortrag geht zwei Leitfragen nach: 1) Wer kommt als Erbauer der kürzlich archäologisch nachgewiesenen Burg in St. Vith in Frage? 2) Entspricht die Burg in ihrer repräsentativen und fortifikatorischen ... [more ▼]

Der Vortrag geht zwei Leitfragen nach: 1) Wer kommt als Erbauer der kürzlich archäologisch nachgewiesenen Burg in St. Vith in Frage? 2) Entspricht die Burg in ihrer repräsentativen und fortifikatorischen Gestaltung eventuell einem „sponheimischen Burgentypus“? [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 55 (0 UL)
Full Text
See detaildolfiny: Convenience wrappers for DOLFINx
Zilian, Andreas UL; Habera, Michal UL

Scientific Conference (2021, March 23)

With the increased flexibility of DOLFINx and its reduction to core functionality, the responsibility for even some basic components of computational analysis is shifted to the user. This presentation ... [more ▼]

With the increased flexibility of DOLFINx and its reduction to core functionality, the responsibility for even some basic components of computational analysis is shifted to the user. This presentation provides an overview of the open-source package dolfiny, which provides end-user API interfaces to mesh/meshtags generation and processing, expression list handling, function interpolation and projection as well as the restriction of function spaces to parts of the computational domain. This functionality is consistently considered in interfaces to PETSc/SNES as nonlinear solver and SLEPc as eigensolver backend, both allowing the operation on block and nested operators. In addition, the package provides a convenient approach to incorporate time integration into the UFL formulation of the problem, which is exemplified for the generalised alpha method. The capability of dolfiny is demonstrated in a number of examples, ranging between finite strain structural analysis, plasticity and fluid-structure interaction. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 66 (3 UL)
See detailDie Pädagogik des Translanguaging: Möglichkeiten und Herausforderungen. Keynote.
Kirsch, Claudine UL

Scientific Conference (2021, March 20)

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (0 UL)