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Mainassara Chekaraou, Abdoul Wahid UL; Besseron, Xavier UL; Rousset, Alban UL et al

Scientific Conference (in press)

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See detailAre Value-Added Scores Stable Enough for High-Stakes Decisions?
Emslander, Valentin UL; Levy, Jessica UL; Scherer, Ronny et al

Scientific Conference (2022, March)

Theoretical Background: Can we quantify the effectiveness of a teacher or a school with a single number? Researchers in the field of value-added (VA) models may argue just that (e.g., Chetty et al., 2014 ... [more ▼]

Theoretical Background: Can we quantify the effectiveness of a teacher or a school with a single number? Researchers in the field of value-added (VA) models may argue just that (e.g., Chetty et al., 2014; Kane et al., 2013). VA models are widely used for accountability purposes in education and quantify the value a teacher or a school adds to their students’ achievement. For this purpose, these models predict achievement over time and attempt to control for factors that cannot be influenced by schools or teachers (i.e., sociodemographic & sociocultural background). Following this logic, what is left must be due to teacher or school differences (see, e.g., Braun, 2005). To utilize VA models for high-stakes decision-making (e.g., teachers’ tenure, the allocation of funding), these models would need to be highly stable over time. School-level stability over time, however, has hardly been researched at all and the resulting findings are mixed, with some studies indicating high stability of school VA scores over time (Ferrão, 2012; Thomas et al., 2007) and others reporting a lack of stability (e.g., Gorard et al., 2013; Perry, 2016). Furthermore, as there is no consensus on which variables to use as independent or dependent variables in VA models (Everson, 2017; Levy et al., 2019), the stability of VA could vary between different outcome measures (e.g., language or mathematics). If VA models lack stability over time and across outcome measures, their use as the primary information for high-stakes decision-making is in question, and the inferences drawn from them could be compromised. Questions: With these uncertainties in mind, we examine the stability of school VA model scores over time and investigate the differences between language and mathematics achievement as outcome variables. Additionally, we demonstrate the real-life implications of (in)stable VA scores for single schools and point out an alternative, more constructive use of school VA models in educational research. Method: To study the stability of VA scores on school level over time and across outcomes, we drew on a sample of 146 primary schools, using representative longitudinal data from the standardized achievement tests of the Luxembourg School Monitoring Programme (LUCET, 2021). These schools included a heterogeneous and multilingual sample of 7016 students. To determine the stability of VA scores in the subject of mathematics and in languages over time, we based our analysis on two longitudinal datasets (from 2015 to 2017 and from 2017 to 2019, respectively) and generated two VA scores per dataset, one for language and one for mathematics achievement. We further analyzed how many schools displayed stable VA scores in the respective outcomes over two years, and compared the rank correlations of VA scores between language and mathematics achievement as an outcome variable. Results and Their Significance: Only 34-38 % of the schools showed stable VA scores from grade 1 to 3 with moderate rank correlations of r = .37 with language and r = .34 with mathematics achievement. We therefore discourage using VA models as the only information for high-stakes educational decisions. Nonetheless, we argue that VA models could be employed to find genuinely effective teaching or school practices—especially in heterogeneous student populations, such as Luxembourg, in which educational disparities are an important topic already in primary school (Hoffmann et al., 2018). Consequently, we contrast the school climate and instructional quality, which might be a driver of the differences between schools with stable high vs. low VA scores. Literature Braun, H. (2005). Using student progress to evaluate teachers: A primer on value-added models. Educational Testing Service. Chetty, R., Friedman, J. N., & Rockoff, J. E. (2014). Measuring the impacts of teachers I: Evaluating bias in teacher value-added estimates. American Economic Review, 104(9), 2593–2632. https://doi.org/10.1257/aer.104.9.2593 Everson, K. C. (2017). Value-added modeling and educational accountability: Are we answering the real questions? Review of Educational Research, 87(1), 35–70. https://doi.org/10.3102/0034654316637199 Ferrão, M. E. (2012). On the stability of value added indicators. Quality & Quantity, 46(2), 627–637. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11135-010-9417-6 Gorard, S., Hordosy, R., & Siddiqui, N. (2013). How unstable are “school effects” assessed by a value-added technique? International Education Studies, 6(1), 1–9. https://doi.org/10.5539/ies.v6n1p1 Kane, T. J., McCaffrey, D. F., Miller, T., & Staiger, D. O. (2013). Have We Identified Effective Teachers? Validating Measures of Effective Teaching Using Random Assignment. Research Paper. MET Project. Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. https://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED540959.pdf Levy, J., Brunner, M., Keller, U., & Fischbach, A. (2019). Methodological issues in value-added modeling: An international review from 26 countries. Educational Assessment, Evaluation and Accountability, 31(3), 257–287. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11092-019-09303-w LUCET. (2021). Épreuves Standardisées (ÉpStan). https://epstan.lu Perry, T. (2016). English value-added measures: Examining the limitations of school performance measurement. British Educational Research Journal, 42(6), 1056–1080. https://doi.org/10.1002/berj.3247 Thomas, S., Peng, W. J., & Gray, J. (2007). Modelling patterns of improvement over time: Value added trends in English secondary school performance across ten cohorts. Oxford Review of Education, 33(3), 261–295. https://doi.org/10.1080/03054980701366116 [less ▲]

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See detailPrivacy-preserving Copy Number Variation Analysis with Homomorphic Encryption
Demirci, Huseyin UL; Lenzini, Gabriele UL

Scientific Conference (2022)

Innovative pharma-genomics and personalized medicine services are now possible thanks to the availability for processing and analysis of a large amount of genomic data. Operating on such databases, is ... [more ▼]

Innovative pharma-genomics and personalized medicine services are now possible thanks to the availability for processing and analysis of a large amount of genomic data. Operating on such databases, is possible to test for predisposition to diseases by searching for genomic variants on whole genomes as well as on exomes, which are collections of protein coding regions called exons. Genomic data are therefore shared amongst research institutes, public/private operators, and third parties, creating issues of privacy, ethics, and data protection because genome data are strictly personal and identifying. To prevent damages that could follow a data breach—a likely threat nowadays—and to be compliant with current data protection regulations, genomic data files should be encrypted, and the data processing algorithms should be privacy-preserving. Such a migration is not always feasible: not all operations can be implemented straightforwardly to be privacypreserving; a privacy-preserving version of an algorithm may not be as accurate for the purpose of biomedical analysis as the original; or the privacy-preserving version may not scale up when applied to genomic data processing because of inefficiency in computation time. In this work, we demonstrate that at least for a wellknown genomic data procedure for the analysis of copy number variants called copy number variations (CNV) a privacy-preserving analysis is possible and feasible. Our algorithm relies on Homomorphic Encryption, a cryptographic technique to perform calculations directly on the encrypted data. We test our implementation for performance and reliability, giving evidence that it is practical to study copy number variations and preserve genomic data privacy. Our proof-of-concept application successfully and efficiently searches for a patient’s somatic copy number variation changes by comparing the patient gene coverage in the whole exome with a healthy control exome coverage. Since all the genomics data are securely encrypted, the data remain protected even if they are transmitted or shared via an insecure environment like a public cloud. Being this the first study for privacy-preserving copy number variation analysis, we demonstrate the potential of recent Homomorphic Encryption tools in genomic applications. [less ▲]

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See detailModel-Based Systems Engineering to Design An Onboard Surround Vision System for Cooperative Automated Vehicles
Kemsaram, Narsimlu UL; Das, Anweshan; Dubbelman, Gijs

Scientific Conference (2021, December 17)

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See detailA SysML-based Design and Development of Stereo Vision System with Pose and Velocity Estimation for Cooperative Automated Vehicles
Kemsaram, Narsimlu UL; Das, Anweshan; Dubbelman, Gijs

Scientific Conference (2021, December 09)

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See detailDual-DNN Assisted Optimization for Efficient Resource Scheduling in NOMA-Enabled Satellite Systems
Wang, Anyue UL; Lei, Lei UL; Lagunas, Eva UL et al

Scientific Conference (2021, December 08)

In this paper, we apply non-orthogonal multiple access (NOMA) in satellite systems to assist data transmission for services with latency constraints. We investigate a problem to minimize the transmission ... [more ▼]

In this paper, we apply non-orthogonal multiple access (NOMA) in satellite systems to assist data transmission for services with latency constraints. We investigate a problem to minimize the transmission time by jointly optimizing power allocation and terminal-timeslot assignment for accomplishing a transmission task in NOMA-enabled satellite systems. The problem appears non-linear/non-convex with integer variables and can be equivalently reformulated in the format of mixed-integer convex programming (MICP). Conventional iterative methods may apply but at the expenses of high computational complexity in approaching the optimum or near-optimum. We propose a combined learning and optimization scheme to tackle the problem, where the primal MICP is decomposed into two learning-suited classification tasks and a power allocation problem. In the proposed scheme, the first learning task is to predict the integer variables while the second task is to guarantee the feasibility of the solutions. Numerical results show that the proposed algorithm outperforms benchmarks in terms of average computational time, transmission time performance, and feasibility guarantee. [less ▲]

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See detailWeb Materialities
Schafer, Valerie UL

Scientific Conference (2021, December 03)

Although Web development was driven by a conceptual repertoire of dematerialisation, of eliminating borders between “Netizens” and ensuring the independence of cyberspace (John Perry Barlow), in the 1990s ... [more ▼]

Although Web development was driven by a conceptual repertoire of dematerialisation, of eliminating borders between “Netizens” and ensuring the independence of cyberspace (John Perry Barlow), in the 1990s the accessibility of the Web was largely subject to material challenges associated with infrastructures, equipment, Internet billing and regulation. They were also linked with groups of technicians and communities of practice, the development of ISPs, the acquisition of equipment or the use of cyber cafés. Taking the example of France in the 90s as a starting point, this contribution will shed light on the agencies at work in a bid to demonstrate why digital materiality matters in Web histories. [less ▲]

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See detailGender Differences and Extreme Events
Lehnert, Thorsten UL

Scientific Conference (2021, December)

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See detailGender Differences and Extreme Events
Lehnert, Thorsten UL

Scientific Conference (2021, December)

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See detailFactors Affecting the Implementation of Computational Thinking in the Curriculum
Hennico, Jeff; Reuter, Robert UL; Weinberger, Armin

Scientific Conference (2021, November 24)

Computational thinking (CT) in fundamental education is an emerging topic in research about educational policies and practices around the globe. In Luxembourg, CT was introduced as a learning topic in ... [more ▼]

Computational thinking (CT) in fundamental education is an emerging topic in research about educational policies and practices around the globe. In Luxembourg, CT was introduced as a learning topic in fundamental schools in 2020. This situation offers a unique opportunity to investigate how various factors influence emerging CT teaching practices. Based on a revised version of the Technology Acceptance Model (Inan & Lowther, 2010), a research-based path model of CT teaching was developed, emphasising the influence of teachers’ beliefs and readiness on CT teaching practices. It investigated the effects of demographic factors, teaching approaches, ICT proficiency, previous CT experience, and overall support for technology integration on readiness, beliefs, and CT teaching practices. The current study reveals that teachers are interested in teaching CT. However, they hold a widespread misconception (Fessakis & Prantsoudi, 2019), confusing CT with programming or technology use. ICT proficiency is indeed associated with beliefs about CT and readiness for teaching CT. Readiness for teaching CT, beliefs about CT, and previous CT experience are the strongest predictors for CT teaching practices. In line with Cuny et al. (2010), the current study highlights the importance of training teachers to accurately define CT and to identify good practices. [less ▲]

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See detailThe need of standardised metadata to encode causal relationships: Towards safer data-driven machine learning biological solutions
Garcia Santa Cruz, Beatriz UL; Vega Moreno, Carlos Gonzalo UL; Hertel, Frank UL

Scientific Conference (2021, November 16)

In this paper, we discuss the importance of considering causal relations in the development of machine learning solutions to prevent factors hampering the robustness and generalisation capacity of the ... [more ▼]

In this paper, we discuss the importance of considering causal relations in the development of machine learning solutions to prevent factors hampering the robustness and generalisation capacity of the models, such as induced biases. This issue often arises when the algorithm decision is affected by confounding factors. In this work, we argue that the integration of causal relationships can identify potential confounders. We call for standardised meta-information practices as a crucial step for proper machine learning solutions development, validation, and data sharing. Such practices include detailing the dataset generation process, aiming for automatic integration of causal relationships. [less ▲]

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See detailUsing Automatic Item Generation in the context of the Épreuves Standardisées (Épstan): A pilot study on effects of altering item characteristics and semantic embeddings
Michels, Michael Andreas UL; Hornung, Caroline UL; Inostroza Fernandez, Pamela Isabel UL et al

Scientific Conference (2021, November 11)

Assessing mathematical skills in national school monitoring programs such as the Luxembourgish Épreuves Standardisées (ÉpStan) creates a constant demand of developing high-quality items that is both ... [more ▼]

Assessing mathematical skills in national school monitoring programs such as the Luxembourgish Épreuves Standardisées (ÉpStan) creates a constant demand of developing high-quality items that is both expensive and time-consuming. One approach to provide high-quality items in a more efficient way is Automatic Item Generation (AIG, Gierl, 2013). Instead of creating single items, cognitive item models form the base for an algorithmic generation of a large number of new items with supposedly identical item characteristics. The stability of item characteristics is questionable, however, when different semantic embeddings are used to present the mathematical problems (Dewolf, Van Dooren, & Verschaffel, 2017, Hoogland, et al., 2018). Given culture-specific knowledge differences in students, it is not guaranteed that illustrations showing everyday activities do not differentially impact item difficulty (Martin, et al., 2012). Moreover, the prediction of empirical item difficulties based on theoretical rationales has proved to be difficult (Leighton & Gierl, 2011). This paper presents a first attempt to better understand the impact of (a) different semantic embeddings, and (b) problem-related variations on mathematics items in grades 1 (n = 2338), 3 (n = 3835) and 5 (n = 3377) within the context of ÉpStan. In total, 30 mathematical problems were presented in up to 4 different versions, either using different but equally plausible semantic contexts or altering the problem’s content characteristics. Preliminary results of IRT-scaling and DIF-analysis reveal substantial effects of both, the embedding, as well as the problem characteristics on general item difficulties as well as on subgroup level. Further results and implications for developing mathematic items, and specifically, for using AIG in the course of Épstan will be discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailFrontières et pluralité des marchés du travail : l’exemple du Luxembourg
Pigeron-Piroth, Isabelle UL; Belkacem, rachid

Scientific Conference (2021, November 11)

L’objet de cette communication est d’aborder la structuration des marchés transfrontaliers du travail. La situation du Luxembourg est particulièrement riche d’enseignements empiriques et théoriques. Dans ... [more ▼]

L’objet de cette communication est d’aborder la structuration des marchés transfrontaliers du travail. La situation du Luxembourg est particulièrement riche d’enseignements empiriques et théoriques. Dans ce petit pays au cœur de la Grande Région SaarLorLux, les frontières se vivent au quotidien. Le marché du travail est ouvert sur ses régions frontalières ainsi que sur l’espace mondial. Dans ce contexte, deux questions organisent notre problématique : Quels sont les effets des frontières sur la structuration du marché du travail ? Et quelles grilles de lectures théoriques paraissent les plus appropriées pour analyser cette structuration particulière du marché du travail ? [less ▲]

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See detailFair Assessment of Cognitive Abilities in Multilingual Children
Kijamet, Dzenita UL; Ugen, Sonja UL

Scientific Conference (2021, November 11)

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See detailGenderrepräsentatiounen an de Schoulbicher vum Enseignement fondamental
Kerger, Sylvie UL; Brasseur, Laurence

Scientific Conference (2021, November 11)

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See detailDevelopment of a screeneing tool for functional vision impairments in early childhood
Monteiro, Sara UL; Esch, Pascale UL; Hipp, Géraldine et al

Scientific Conference (2021, November 11)

Cerebral Visual Impairment (CVI) is a term used to designate a neurological disorder of the visual pathways impacting visual processes at any given level (Lueck et al., 2019). Due to the advances n ... [more ▼]

Cerebral Visual Impairment (CVI) is a term used to designate a neurological disorder of the visual pathways impacting visual processes at any given level (Lueck et al., 2019). Due to the advances n perinatal and medicinal care, CVI’s occurrence has increased significantly over the last years (Chokron & Dutton, 2016). The condition almost always entails aggregated functional vision impairments, i.e., limitations on the use of binocular vision during everyday tasks (Dutton, 2015). CVI can have effects on school achievements if undetected. Early detection is thus key to offer appropriate aids to avoid a negative impact on learning processes. The aim of this project is to develop a large-scale screener at the beginning of formal schooling, to identify functional vision impairments early on. For this reason, a set of items assessing different visual functions will be incorporated into the Luxembourgish school monitoring program. Based on a theoretical model of object recognition (Humphreys and Riddoch, 1987), we developed items that can be administered in a classroom setting which target different stages of visual perceptual processing, as well as visual functions connected with both dorsal and ventral streams, visual spatial processing and visual memory. We will present the design of the large-scale screener in relation to the theoretical model, as well as the rationale used to include or exclude various perceptual visual functions in the final test. Furthermore, we will explain the foreseen data collection and tool validation processes. [less ▲]

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See detailOpening minds to translanguaging pedagogies: perspectives and practices of professionals in early childhood education and primary school.Keynote
Kirsch, Claudine UL

Scientific Conference (2021, November 09)

In Europe, migration, mobility, technology and globalisation have resulted in multilingualism at the societal and individual level. These changes require policy-makers and educationalists to adapt ... [more ▼]

In Europe, migration, mobility, technology and globalisation have resulted in multilingualism at the societal and individual level. These changes require policy-makers and educationalists to adapt teaching. For the last decades, institutions and scholars have called for multilingual education programmes that recognise the existence of the multiple languages spoken by children. The policies of the Council of Europe encourage ‘pluralistic approaches’ as well as early language learning. In the United States, García and her team developed multilingual pedagogies, later called translanguaging pedagogies, that draw on the students’ entire semiotic repertoire to leverage their learning. Research findings in monolingual, bilingual and multilingual contexts testify to the benefits of translanguaging for learning, well-being and identity-building. Such programmes are in line with the UN convention of children’s rights demanding respect for their language, culture and values. While multilingual programmes have been implemented in early childhood education and primary schools in several countries in Europe, professionals seem to be unsure of how to promote multilingualism and deal with language diversity. This presentation is based on the perspectives and practices of professionals in early education and primary schools in multilingual Luxembourg where a programme of plurilingual education has been implemented in the early years in 2017 and where children follow a trilingual curriculum in primary school. I will provide insights into the perspectives of practitioners by drawing on several research projects carried out over the last 6 years in Luxembourg. I will show excerpts of interviews and observations that indicate that early years practitioners have opened up to multilingual education over the last years and are tackling the multiple challenges they face during the implementation of the multilingual programme. Translanguaging also exists in primary schools but a clear language hierarchy is in place and teachers and children do not draw on their entire semiotic repertoire. The presentation concludes with implications for practitioners and policy-makers. [less ▲]

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See detailCentrality and city size effects on NO2 ground and tropospheric concentrations within European cities
Wei, Yufei UL; Caruso, Geoffrey UL; Lemoy, Rémi

Scientific Conference (2021, November 05)

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See detailWARCnet WG2 activities: a report
Schafer, Valerie UL

Scientific Conference (2021, November 03)

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See detailThe Zoom City: Working From Home and Urban Land Structure
Picard, Pierre M UL; Kyirakopoulou, Efthymia

Scientific Conference (2021, November)

How would cities change if working from home (WFH) persisted in the post-pandemic era? This paper investigates the impact of WFH in the internal structure of monocentric cities, where production is ... [more ▼]

How would cities change if working from home (WFH) persisted in the post-pandemic era? This paper investigates the impact of WFH in the internal structure of monocentric cities, where production is characterized by management and employee spillovers. We find that business land rents decrease, while residential land rents fall close to the business center and increase in the suburbs. WFH raises urban productivity and average wages only in large cities. The paper also studies the optimal fraction of WFH from a residents and welfare point of view. Our results suggest that workers-residents have incentives to adopt an inefficiently high WFH scheme. We finally discuss the implementation of remote work in the short run. We show that WFH implies higher benefits for long distance commuters and lower benefits or even losses for firms and short distance commuters. [less ▲]

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See detailSafeTraveller - A conversational assistant for BeNeLux travellers
kudryavtseva, kristina; Hoehn, Sviatlana UL

Scientific Conference (2021, November)

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See detailStability of Primary School Value-Added Scores over Time: A Comparison Between Math and Language Achievement as Outcome Variables
Emslander, Valentin UL; Levy, Jessica UL; Scherer, Ronny et al

Scientific Conference (2021, November)

Value-added (VA) models are widely used for accountability purposes in education. Tracking a teacher’s or a school’s VA score over time forms oftentimes the basis for high-stakes decision-making and can ... [more ▼]

Value-added (VA) models are widely used for accountability purposes in education. Tracking a teacher’s or a school’s VA score over time forms oftentimes the basis for high-stakes decision-making and can determine whether teachers can keep their jobs or schools may receive certain funding. Despite their high-stakes application, the stability of VA scores over time has not yet been investigated for primary schools. Moreover, it is unclear whether different outcome measures (e.g., language and mathematics) may differ in their stability over time. In the present study, we aimed to clarify the stability of VA scores over time and investigate the differences across outcome variables. Furthermore, we wanted to showcase the real-life implications of (in)stable VA scores for single schools, with a focus on an informative use of VA scores rather than an evaluative way. The exploration of school VA scores in primary schools is especially relevant for heterogeneous student populations, for instance, in Luxembourg. Thus, we drew on representative longitudinal data from the standardized achievement tests of the Luxembourg School Monitoring Programme and examined the stability of school VA scores over two years in 146 schools (N = 7016 students). The overall stability, as measured by correlation coefficients, was moderate with r = .37 for VA scores in language and r = .34 for VA scores in mathematics from grade one to grade three. Real-life implications for schools will be discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on the Luxembourgish Education System: Differences between students based on background characteristics in elementary and secondary school
Fischbach, Antoine UL; Colling, Joanne UL; Levy, Jessica UL et al

Scientific Conference (2021, November)

Policy responses to the COVID-19 pandemic (e.g., school closure, home-schooling) have affected students at various stages of education all over the world and were found to increase inequalities in ... [more ▼]

Policy responses to the COVID-19 pandemic (e.g., school closure, home-schooling) have affected students at various stages of education all over the world and were found to increase inequalities in academic achievement (OECD, 2021). The present study is based on fully representative large-scale data from the Luxembourg School Monitoring Programme (Épreuves Standardisées; ÉpStan; LUCET, 2021). The ÉpStan are assessing key competencies of primary and secondary school students in different subjects (e.g., German, French and Math). To allow a fair performance comparison, socio-economic and socio-cultural backgrounds of students (e.g., gender, migration and language background) are systematically taken into consideration. The ÉpStan 2020 entail data from approximatively 25.000 students from five different grades (elementary and secondary school), from 15.000 parents (elementary school) and comparative data from 160.000 students from previous cohorts, thus providing key empirical findings on the pandemic’s impact on the Luxembourgish education system. In the present contribution, we analyze a) how the results of standardized achievement tests compare to previous cohorts and under consideration of students’ socio-economical and socio-cultural background, as well as b) how parents and students perceived home-schooling with regard to aspects such as coping, technical equipment, motivation or contact to teachers. First results indicate that in Grades 1, 5, 7 and 9, standardized achievement scores were generally stable in comparison to previous years. However, in Grade 3, students’ competency scores in German (primary language of instruction in elementary school) listening comprehension worsened substantially. Furthermore, third graders from socio-economically disadvantaged households and/or students that do not speak Luxembourgish/German at home did worse in German reading comprehension than their peers from socio-economically advantaged households and/or speaking Luxembourgish/German at home. Concerning the perception of home-schooling, students coped rather well with the situation, with German being a bit more challenging in primary school and math in secondary school. Findings concerning motivation and enjoyment of home-schooling were mixed, with primary school students’ motivation being comparably to the regular school setting but approximately half of the secondary school students being less motivated than in the regular school setting. Furthermore, all households seem to have been well equipped, with the situation being slightly more favorable in socio-economically advantaged households. For the majority of students, the contact with teachers was frequent, with teachers having adapted their type of support to the needs of their students (e.g., more personal contact towards students from socio-economically disadvantaged households). To conclude, it can be said that no systematic negative trend has been identified in students’ achievement scores. Only German listening comprehension in Grade 3 has worsened substantially and these skills should therefore be fostered as early as possible. Overall, students coped rather well with home-schooling without, however, particularly enjoying it. While students entering the pandemic with favorable background characteristics (e.g., higher socio-economic status, speaking a language of instruction at home) managed better both regarding competencies and perception of home-schooling, students with less favorable background characteristics have received more differentiated support. These findings underline that already existing inequalities in the Luxembourgish school system have in parts been intensified by the pandemic. References LUCET. (2021). Épreuves Standardisées (ÉpStan). https://epstan.lu OECD. (2021). The State of School Education: One Year into the COVID Pandemic. OECD Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1787/201dde84-en [less ▲]

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See detailGrenzüberschreitende Identitäten in der Großregion?
Wille, Christian UL

Scientific Conference (2021, November)

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See detailDevelopment of a large-scale screener for functional vision impairments in early childhood
Monteiro, Sara UL; Esch, Pascale UL; Hipp, Géraldine et al

Scientific Conference (2021, October 21)

Cerebral Visual Impairment (CVI) is a term used to designate a neurological disorder of the visual pathways impacting visual processes at any given level (Lueck et al., 2019). Due to the advances in ... [more ▼]

Cerebral Visual Impairment (CVI) is a term used to designate a neurological disorder of the visual pathways impacting visual processes at any given level (Lueck et al., 2019). Due to the advances in perinatal and medicinal care, CVI’s occurrence has increased significantly over the last years (Chokron & Dutton, 2016). The condition almost always entails aggregated functional vision impairments, i.e., limitations on the use of binocular vision during everyday tasks (Dutton, 2015). CVI can have effects on school achievements if undetected. Early detection is thus key to offer appropriate aids to avoid a negative impact on learning processes. The aim of this project is to develop a large-scale screener at the beginning of formal schooling, to identify functional vision impairments early on. For this reason, a set of items assessing different visual functions will be incorporated into the Luxembourgish school monitoring program. Based on a theoretical model of visual perceptual processing (Humphreys and Riddoch, 1987), we developed timed and non-timed items that can be administered in a large-scale classroom setting which target different stages of visual perceptual processing. Furthermore, we included visual functions connected with both dorsal and ventral streams, visual spatial processing, visual exploration and visual memory. We will present the design of the large-scale screener in relation to the theoretical model, as well as the rationale used to include or exclude various perceptual visual functions in the final test. Furthermore, we will explain the planned data collection and tool validation processes. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Past Web as Heritage: Practices, Challenges and Uses of Web Archives
Schafer, Valerie UL

Scientific Conference (2021, October 20)

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See detailChemical contamination of the sea – (management of the knowns and) Research on the unknowns
Schymanski, Emma UL

Scientific Conference (2021, October 20)

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See detailTwo centuries of music education in Luxembourg. 'Learning to teach' in the focus of two traditions
Sagrillo, Damien François UL

Scientific Conference (2021, October 15)

Mit der Teilung Luxemburgs zu Beginn des 19. Jahrhunderts wird das Land einsprachig. Es verbleibt der luxemburgischsprachige (moselfränkische) Teil. Zum besseren Verständnis der kulturellen Entwicklung ... [more ▼]

Mit der Teilung Luxemburgs zu Beginn des 19. Jahrhunderts wird das Land einsprachig. Es verbleibt der luxemburgischsprachige (moselfränkische) Teil. Zum besseren Verständnis der kulturellen Entwicklung Luxemburgs – sie setzt für die musikalische Bildung um die Mitte des 19. Jahrhunderts ein – ist das Wissen um den historischen Kontext unerlässlich. Publikationen erster musikpädagogischer Werke, in der Mehrzahl Liederbücher, werden mit didaktischen Anweisungen eingeleitet, stehen nicht selten unter der Einflussnahme der katholischen Kirche und werden in einschlägigen Publikationsorganen behandelt. Dabei spielt die Bewegung des Cäcilianismus eine herausgehobene Rolle. Der erste spezialisierte Musikunterricht (Instrumentalunterricht und Gesangsunterricht) erfolgt in Privatinitiative, bis im Jahr 1844 der Gemeinderat der Stadt Luxemburg der Gründung der ersten öffentlichen Musikschule im Großherzogtum zustimmt. Die Besetzung von Direktorenposten und Lehrern abwechselnd mit deutsch- und mit französischsprachigen Persönlichkeiten führt zu einem Sonderweg musikpädagogischen Wirkens. Seit dem Jahrhundertwechsel sind die Grundsteine des spezialisierten Musikunterrichts gelegt. Die geographische Nähe zum Pariser bzw. zum Brüsseler Konservatorium führen jedoch überwiegend zur Übernahme der dort vorherrschenden Traditionen. Das Thema des Symposiums 'Das Lehren lernen' bewahrheitet sich hier in der Negation. Angehende Lehrer sind zuerst Musiker, dann Lehrer. Das Erwerben von Expertise erfolgt vielfach durch Lernen in der Praxis. Diese Tendenz setzt sich z.T. bis heute fort. Studiengänge für musikpädagogische Praxis werden in französischsprachigen Ländern sehr spät angeboten und existieren in Luxemburg bis heute nicht. Auf der anderen Seite folgt der Musikunterricht (Gesangunterricht) in Grund- und Sekundarschulen eher der Vorgehensweise in deutschsprachigen Ländern. Die gegenseitige Beeinflussung im Fokus der beiden Traditionen ist in diesem Bereich weniger ausgeprägt. Für meinen Vortrag schlage ich einen historischen Überblick über die Entwicklung der Musikpädagogik in Luxemburg anhand von der Organisation des spezialisierten Musikunterrichts vor. Die Ausbildung der Lehrenden im Bereich der Kirchenmusik gehört als integrativer Bestandteil in den Vortrag mit einbezogen. [less ▲]

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See detailLes soldats de la Wehrmacht d'Eupen-Malmedy
Brüll, Christoph UL

Scientific Conference (2021, October 14)

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See detailEphemeriShield - Defence Against Cyber-Antisatellite Weapons
Graczyk, Rafal UL; Volp, Marcus UL

Scientific Conference (2021, October 14)

Mitigating the risks associated with space system operations, especially in Low Earth Orbit, requires a holistic approach, which addresses, in particular, cybersecurity challenges, in addition to meeting ... [more ▼]

Mitigating the risks associated with space system operations, especially in Low Earth Orbit, requires a holistic approach, which addresses, in particular, cybersecurity challenges, in addition to meeting the data acquisition requirements the mission needs. Space traffic management systems form no exception to this rule, but are further constrained by backward compatibility requirements that sometimes are based on decades old foundations. As a result, some space situational awareness systems continue to operate with object catalogues and data dissemination architectures that are prone to failures, not to mention adversarial actions. Proof-of-Concept papers, demonstrating this vulnerability in example attacks on space object ephemerides distribution channels have already been published and show the urgency in rethinking the way we build such high-critical infrastructure. Leveraging recent developments of distributed systems theory and concepts from multi-party consensus in limited-trust environments and in the presence of malicious actors, we designed a more secure system for orbital object ephemerides distribution, ultimately targeting at increasing the safety of satellite operations. This paper presents EphemeriShield, a distributed ephemerides storage and distribution system, aiming at maintaining safety and security guarantees in presence of active attacker or unfortunate fault. Using our EphemeriShield prototype setup, we were able to prove its ability to mask attacks and local faults that otherwise would lead to unnecessary maneuvers. Wide adoption of EphemeriShield may help satellite system operations to become safer and less vulnerable to intentionally adversarial activities, which improves the overall sustainability of space. [less ▲]

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See detailRecension d' European Drama and Performance Studies n° 16 : « Percevoir et transmettre le spectacle vivant »
Deregnoncourt, Marine UL

Scientific Conference (2021, October 11)

Cette recension, divisée en trois temps, va suivre les différents points de vue adoptés par les participants au seizième numéro de la revue European Drama and Performance Studies, consacré à la perception ... [more ▼]

Cette recension, divisée en trois temps, va suivre les différents points de vue adoptés par les participants au seizième numéro de la revue European Drama and Performance Studies, consacré à la perception et à la transmission du spectacle vivant et dirigé par Françoise Gomez et Daniel Loayza : 1. Le regard du chercheur (Florence Naugrette, Julia Gros de Gasquet et Patrice Pavis) ; 2. Le regard du praticien de la scène (Emmanuel Demarcy-Mota et Don Kent) ; 3. L’archivage mémoriel (Sandrine Siméon et Daniel Loayza). [less ▲]

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See detailL’UEBL et les relations belgo-luxembourgeoises au XXème siècle
Brüll, Christoph UL

Scientific Conference (2021, October 06)

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See detailSix provocations for 6G
Schafer, Valerie UL

Scientific Conference (2021, October 06)

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See detailCareer journeys of skilled migrants in Luxembourg: a qualitative exploration
Usanova, Ksenia UL

Scientific Conference (2021, October 05)

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See detailKeynote lecture: Exploring Jewish History in the Digital Age
Zaagsma, Gerben UL

Scientific Conference (2021, October 04)

This lecture will explore the intersection of Jewish Studies and Digital Humanities in general, and the myriad ways in which new technologies affect the field of Jewish History in particular. Importantly ... [more ▼]

This lecture will explore the intersection of Jewish Studies and Digital Humanities in general, and the myriad ways in which new technologies affect the field of Jewish History in particular. Importantly, the digital turn in Jewish Studies needs to be historicised; as is the case for the humanities in general, applications of computing in Jewish Studies go back at least 60 years. And as is true for the humanities in general, we should be careful to differentiate engagements with technology in the various (sub-)disciplines that Jewish Studies incorporates, while remaining attentive to common methodological and epistemological questions. In my lecture I will address these broader issues and ask what specific characteristics, if any, Jewish Studies scholars face, before delving into the specific challenges for Jewish historical research. I will then discuss how digital approaches have been, are, and could be harnassed to address these. As digitisation opens up new avenues for research, and can help overcome the classic problem of dispersal of sources, a crucial question to ask is what (Jewish) heritage is being digitised and which stories about the (Jewish) past can (and cannot) be told using them. What are the politics of digitisation in the context of Jewish history and how can we ensure that the offline Jewish historical record remains as relevant as its online counterpart in an age where more and more scholars move to using online resources? In short, how does the digital turn affect Jewish historical research and how can we bring about the full potential of the digital turn for research into Jewish history? [less ▲]

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See detailFlight to Safety and Retail Investor Behavior
Lehnert, Thorsten UL

Scientific Conference (2021, October)

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See detailQuality and Trade with Many Countries and Industries
Picard, Pierre M UL; Tampieri, Alessandro

Scientific Conference (2021, October)

This paper investigates a trade model with many countries, many goods produced in multiple quality versions and non-homothetic preferences. It studies the impact of productivity, population changes and ... [more ▼]

This paper investigates a trade model with many countries, many goods produced in multiple quality versions and non-homothetic preferences. It studies the impact of productivity, population changes and trade costs on the quality composition of exports. The analysis embeds within the same model a series of empirical results about high-income countries specialization and trade in higher quality goods. Product di¤erentiation matters at explaining the volumes of trade quality. High-quality goods exhibiting a high degree of di¤erentiation are traded only by high-income countries. [less ▲]

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See detailEnablers for Matching Demand in GEO Multi-Beam Satellites: Dynamic Beamforming, Precoding, or Both?
Chaker, Haythem UL; Maturo, Nicola UL; Chatzinotas, Symeon UL et al

Scientific Conference (2021, September 30)

In trending satellite communication applications, the traffic demand is not only rapidly increasing, it is also spatiotemporally evolving. This motivates the deployment of high throughput satellite ... [more ▼]

In trending satellite communication applications, the traffic demand is not only rapidly increasing, it is also spatiotemporally evolving. This motivates the deployment of high throughput satellite systems with flexible radio resource management and transmission techniques. In contrast to regular beam layout plans (RBLP) currently used in GEO payloads, future flexible payloads are capable of dynamic beamforming (DBF) in order to illuminate the coverage area using highly-directive and traffic-adaptive beampatterns. The beampatterns in an adaptive beam layout plan (ABLP) can have irregular shapes and mutual overlaps, potentially causing excessive inter-beam interferences (IBI) compared to the RBLP case. In this work, we evaluate the combination of DBF and precoding as the latter promises high throughputs in interference-limited conditions and is supported by the recent DVB-S2X norm. Under realistic non-uniform traffic patterns, we compare a typical RBLP against an ABLP in terms of their traffic matching performances with and without precoding. Through the comparisons, we show that DBF enables to significantly reduce the capacity mismatches using an ABLP that uniformly balances the demand distribution across beams. Noting that the ABLP is IBI agnostic, an unpredictable interference environment is built. In such conditions, precoding enables to reliably provide high throughputs through full frequency reuse. [less ▲]

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See detailHousing Exclusion and Social Work Strategies in Luxembourg
Dujardin, Céline UL

Scientific Conference (2021, September 24)

In the Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg, the demand for affordable housing is significantly higher than the existing offer (Reuter, 2017). For financially disadvantaged households, the housing costs around 40 ... [more ▼]

In the Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg, the demand for affordable housing is significantly higher than the existing offer (Reuter, 2017). For financially disadvantaged households, the housing costs around 40% of the available budget represent a very high expenditure. Ametepe (2019) observed an exacerbation of the risk of poverty in relation to housing costs. The SOHOME (SOcial housing and HOMElessness) project pursues research questions related to individuals who are experiencing housing difficulties in Luxembourg, thereby drawing the current state-of-affairs as well as exploring potential solutions. Main questions are: (1) “What characterizes the concerned population in Luxembourg?”, (2) “How do social policies and social work respond to the identified issues?” and (3) “What are the main challenges of the social work in the field of homelessness and housing exclusion?” Through the qualitative design, several focus groups and interviews with social workers provide important insights to answer the research questions. Probably the largest proportion of homelessness services across Europe consists of low-threshold services that provide basic support outside of the housing sector or emergency/temporary accommodation. In contrast, services that immediately provide homeless people with a permanent home are only present to a certain extent in most countries (Pleace, Baptista, Benjaminsen & Busch-Geertsema, 2018). The SOHOME project targets various social services, from the emergency accommodation to the municipal social welfare office. The results from the discussions with social workers acting in the municipal social welfare offices show how great the demand for social and affordable living room is and how present forms of housing exclusion as well as solution-focused strategies are. [less ▲]

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See detailMetascience: Disrupting the status quo or perpetuating inequities
Kozlowski, Diego UL

Scientific Conference (2021, September 23)

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See detailIntertwining distant reading of web archives and oral histories of the COVID crisis
Schafer, Valerie UL

Scientific Conference (2021, September 22)

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See detailExploring the History of Digital History
Zaagsma, Gerben UL

Scientific Conference (2021, September 20)

As long as new preservation technologies and computing machines have been developed, the question of their utility and uptake in historical research practices has been debated. Yet, the very fact that ... [more ▼]

As long as new preservation technologies and computing machines have been developed, the question of their utility and uptake in historical research practices has been debated. Yet, the very fact that historical knowledge production has always been affected by new and emerging technologies is often forgotten. Similarly, the fact that key epistemological and methodological questions in what we now call ‘digital history’ were already debated decades ago by earlier generations of computing historians (analog and digital) is often overlooked. There is a lack of transmission of accumulated knowledge from the past and it sometimes seems as if every new generation of historians rediscovers the promise of ‘digital history’, with all of its attending hopes, visions and ambitions for reinventing and reshaping historical research. To fill this gap, this paper will explore what a history of digital history might look like. It will do so by focusing on hybridity as a key characteristic of historical research. Hybridity, seen as some form of integrating newly emerging tools, technologies, materials, and/or practices in historical research, has a long history that predates the advent of computers. In my paper I will map and qualify that history according to the main phases of historical research. The paper will conclude by outlining what groundwork is necessary to explore digital history’s forgotten roots: a basic overview of the field’s different spatio-temporal and ideological trajectories and recreation of the networks of computing historians in the pre-PC and early PC period. [less ▲]

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See detailFacets of conscientiousness and their relation to academic achievement: a person-centered approach
Franzen, Patrick UL; Niepel, Christoph UL; Arens, A Katrin et al

Scientific Conference (2021, September 16)

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See detailUpdate on NORMAN-SusDat NORMAN-SLE (Suspect List Exchange)
Schymanski, Emma UL

Scientific Conference (2021, September 14)

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See detailHarnessing the Exposome, Cheminformatics and Mass Spectrometry for Clinical Metabolomics
Schymanski, Emma UL

Scientific Conference (2021, September 14)

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See detailIdentifying Exposome Chemicals: Measured Data Metadata, Metabolism and More …
Schymanski, Emma UL

Scientific Conference (2021, September 10)

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See detailLong-Term Effects of Retention in Grade 8 in Luxembourg
Klapproth, Florian; Keller, Ulrich UL; Fischbach, Antoine UL

Scientific Conference (2021, September 10)

Meta-analyses (Hattie, 2009; Jimerson, 2001) have suggested that grade retention rarely has positive effects and more often negative effects on students’ performance and psycho-emotional well-being. The ... [more ▼]

Meta-analyses (Hattie, 2009; Jimerson, 2001) have suggested that grade retention rarely has positive effects and more often negative effects on students’ performance and psycho-emotional well-being. The occurrence of negative effects may be due to the absence of new learning experiences (Pagani, Tremblay, Vitaro, Boulerice & McDuff, 2001). However, in the short term, positive effects of grade retention are quite likely to occur (Klapproth, Schaltz, Brunner, Keller, Fischbach, Ugen & Martin, 2016). In Luxembourg, more than half of the students repeat at least one grade within their entire school career (Klapproth & Schaltz, 2015). Since grade retention is applied so frequently, the aim of the current study was to examine long-term effects of grade retention, and particularly retention in grade 8. The data used in this study were drawn from 2,835 Luxembourgish students who completed primary education (grade 6) and began secondary education (grade 7) in the 2008-2009 school year. We conducted propensity-score matching to select retained and promoted students with comparable characteristics. We used the “same age-cohort, same grade, different times of measurement” approach for comparisons (Klapproth et al., 2016). The dependent variables were the school marks in the main subjects (German, French, and mathematics) in grades 10, 11, and 12, which can vary between 0 and 60 (with higher values indicating better achievement, and values below 30 indicating insufficient achievement). Our results showed that grade 8 repeaters obtain significantly lower school marks in grades 10 to 12 as compared to matched non-repeaters, with most negative effects appearing for mathematics and French (as opposed to German) and with negative effects strengthening significantly with time. These results seem to confirm results of previous meta-analyses on longer-term effects of grade retention, seemingly suggesting that grade retention is no effective means to tackle low student achievement. [less ▲]

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See detailNational Justice vs. Occupiers’ Justice? A conflict of competence in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg during World War I
Wingerter, Elisabeth UL

Scientific Conference (2021, September 08)

From the standpoint of international law, the entry of German troops on the territory of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg in August 1914 violated the small state’s neutrality. While the occupying German ... [more ▼]

From the standpoint of international law, the entry of German troops on the territory of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg in August 1914 violated the small state’s neutrality. While the occupying German authorities saw this act as an occupatio pacifica and the violation of its neutrality as a necessity in order to respond to a state of emergency, the Luxembourgish government and its justice administration had to cope with a new set of problems. The government, led by state minister Paul Eyschen, and the country’s monarchical leader Marie-Adélaïde pursued a strategy of appeasement towards the occupier, but also attempted to guard the sovereignty of their state as well as of their justice system. With the establishment of German military justice and a central police office in Luxembourg, the sovereignty of Luxembourg’s French-inspired justice was curtailed. However, German authorities made clear that they do not intend to challenge the spheres of local justice, unless cases of military relevance would arise. After all, Luxembourg was a country with close links to the Kaiserreich and an important industrial partner and therefore had to receive a privileged treatment compared to other occupied territories. However, with Luxembourgers being arrested by the German military and German soldiers committing crimes on Luxembourgish ground, the two justice systems, military and local, clashed. Since the status of the “friendly occupation” created legal misunderstandings, local judges, magistrates of the high court (cour supérieure) and German authorities stood in constant correspondence regarding a large amount of court cases and competence disputes. Consequently, in 1915, members of the high magistrate made their way to Frankfurt and Berlin to discuss the status of Luxembourgish justice. These discussions would eventually lead back to the question whether the country was truly to be considered a theater of war (Kriegsschauplatz). Overall, the discussion about the spheres of national and occupier justice became part of a much larger question: What is the legal nature of German occupation in Luxemburg? This paper explores how the two justice systems interacted and highlights court cases where their competences intertwined. These observations show how the local administration had to apply a mix of compromise and pertinacity in order to avoid open conflict but at the same time tried to keep Luxembourgish civilians out of the reach of German military justice. In doing so, several interesting observations can be made regarding the legal discussions between lawyers and prosecutors of both sides. Additionally, the paper offers an insight into a variety of local cases ranging from German soldiers marauding drunkenly on Luxemburgish streets to the arrest of a Luxembourgish judge and amateur historian. Overall, the presented paper attempts to show that while the local justice system was not altered by the occupier, it suffered a cut in its competence in certain spheres of civil justice. However, in comparison to the later Nazi occupation of Luxembourg, local justice administration and its personnel were kept in their place, but had to constantly negotiate certain aspects of civil and international law with the German authorities – often to their own disadvantage. [less ▲]

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See detailFirst steps into developing multilingual practices in ECEC in Luxembourg: Insights from the projects MuLiPEC and COMPARE
Kirsch, Claudine UL

Scientific Conference (2021, September 07)

Translanguaging pedagogies promise to take account of students’ language and socio-cultural backgrounds and contribute to their academic achievements (García, Johnson, and Seltzer, 2017). Researchers who ... [more ▼]

Translanguaging pedagogies promise to take account of students’ language and socio-cultural backgrounds and contribute to their academic achievements (García, Johnson, and Seltzer, 2017). Researchers who have investigated translanguaging practices in monolingual, bilingual and multilingual contexts, have shown that translanguaging promotes learning, well-being, and identity-building (Lewis, Jones, and Baker, 2012; García & Sylvan, 2011; Young & Mary, 2016; Vaish 2019a). Studies in early childhood education and care (ECEC) remain scarce, particularly those that focus on the use of institutional languages and home languages. Furthermore, little is known about the implementation of translanguaging pedagogies and the challenges faced by professionals. One exception comes from Vaish (2019 a, b) who investigated the practices of primary teachers in Singapore who taught in English, Chinese and Malay. She identified three main challenges: superdiversity, negative attitudes towards home language, and teacher-centred pedagogies. Studies on professional development (PD) in ECEC have shown that PD can help practitioners change beliefs, knowledge and practices to some extent (Egert et al. 2018). This presentation comes from multilingual Luxembourg, where 63.7% of the 4-year-olds do not speak Luxembourgish as their home language. Since 2017, educators in ECEC are required to develop children’s skills in Luxembourgish, familiarise them with French and value their home languages. Professional development courses help practitioners move away from monolingual policies and practices that existed prior to 2017, and implement multilingual pedagogies. This paper examines the challenges teachers and educators faced during this process. It is based on seven group interviews carried out during two research projects; the first aimed to develop multilingual pedagogies (MuLiPEC), the second collaboration with parents and multiliteracies (COMPARE). The findings, based on thematic analysis, indicate, firstly, that the educators faced multiple challenges when trying to change their practices such as their uncertainty of how to deal with multiliteracy, their behaviourist views on education, their inexperience of planning literacy activities in multiple languages, and, secondly, the ways in which they overcame them. The PD courses helped them reflect on their beliefs, challenge monolingual ideologies, and develop knowledge about language learning and new multilingual practices (Kirsch 2020). The findings shed light on the complexities of the implementation process and the support needed for professional learning. [less ▲]

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See detailPerspectives on multilingualism and multilingual literacies from early childhood educators in Luxembourg
Kirsch, Claudine UL; Aleksic, Gabrijela UL; Bebić, Džoen Dominique UL et al

Scientific Conference (2021, September 04)

The pedagogies of multiliteracies and translanguaging (García et al., 2017) call for multiliteracies, but early childhood educators are often ensure of how to develop practices in one, let alone multiple ... [more ▼]

The pedagogies of multiliteracies and translanguaging (García et al., 2017) call for multiliteracies, but early childhood educators are often ensure of how to develop practices in one, let alone multiple languages. The development of literacy skills is often reduced to the isolated training of phonological awareness or the letters of the alphabet. By contrast, storytelling is a holistic approach which contributes to the development of language and literacy skills (Sénéchal & Lefevre, 2001). It can promote multilingualism if multilingual speakers are involved (Kirsch, 2018). This presentation reports on the perspectives on multiliteracies of educators in crèches in multilingual Luxembourg, where 63.7% of the 4-year-olds do not speak Luxembourgish at home. Multilingual education became mandatory in 2017, requesting educators to develop Luxembourgish, promote French and value home languages. The mix-method project Collaboration with parents and Multiliteracy in early Childhood Education aims to develop literacy practices in multiple languages and with multiple actors (parents, educators) through professional development in crèches. In this paper we report the findings of interviews and a survey sent to 700 educators in May 2020. The latter were asked to identify literacy practices (e.g. storytelling), language-promoting strategies, and translanguaging practices. The data are analysed with thematic analysis and descriptive statistical analysis. The findings will contribute to our understanding of current ideologies, pedagogies, and practices, and help identify issues and possible ways forward. [less ▲]

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See detailA professional development course in translanguaging: Teachers, parents and children working together.
Aleksic, Gabrijela UL

Scientific Conference (2021, September 04)

Translanguaging pedagogy promotes deeper understanding of school subjects, increases metalinguistic awareness, affirms multilingual identities, and encourages home-school collaboration (García, 2017 ... [more ▼]

Translanguaging pedagogy promotes deeper understanding of school subjects, increases metalinguistic awareness, affirms multilingual identities, and encourages home-school collaboration (García, 2017). Given that multilingual education is mandatory In Luxembourg, our project aims to (1) offer a professional development (PD) course in translanguaging to preschool teachers, (2) involve children’s families to reinforce home-school collaboration, and (3) foster children’s cognitive, linguistic, and socio-emotional engagement in the classroom. We used a mixed-method approach: language portraits, questionnaires, and focus groups with teachers, questionnaires and interviews with parents, and a test in early literacy and numeracy in school and home language and video observations with children. During the period of six months, we delivered a 22-hour PD course that focused on the development of teachers’ multilingual classroom, home-school collaboration, information about the multilingual brain and cross-linguistic transfer, oracy and multiliteracies. We worked with 40 teachers, children in their preschools, and the children’s parents. In the final focus groups, the teachers shared that they felt more relieved that children’s home languages do not confuse them and do not hinder the learning of Luxembourgish. They saw children’s emergent multilingualism as beneficial for their learning and let them express themselves freely. In addition, they understood that translanguaging is about communication, which invited them to start using languages they did not know to better relate to the children in their class. The effect of the PD course on parents and children was also positive. Some children were more involved in learning activities when their languages were used and some parents were enthusiastic to share their language through storytelling in the classroom. García, O. (2017). Translanguaging in schools: Subiendo y Bajando, Bajando y Subiendo as afterword. Journal of Language, Identity & Education, 16(4), 256-263. doi:10.1080/15348458.2017.1329657 [less ▲]

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See detailThe Decline of Repair Businesses? Luxembourg’s Repair Sector, 1971–1985
Krebs, Stefan UL; Hoppenheit, Thomas UL

Scientific Conference (2021, September 03)

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See detailLuxembourg Perspectives on Pre-Service Teacher Motivation: What Factors Influence the Choice of Becoming a Teacher, Perseverance and Success?
Rivas, Salvador UL; Poncelet, Débora UL; Reeff, Alain et al

Scientific Conference (2021, September 02)

In 2016, UNESCO estimated that 24.4 million primary school teachers and another 44.4 million secondary school teachers were needed to provide every child in the world access to education. Widespread ... [more ▼]

In 2016, UNESCO estimated that 24.4 million primary school teachers and another 44.4 million secondary school teachers were needed to provide every child in the world access to education. Widespread teacher shortages have led researchers to investigate what motivates candidates to become teachers and to remain in the profession (see for example Watt et al., 2012). Luxembourg is no exception, in 2019 for example, the government wanted to hire 320 new teachers at the fundamental school level; however, only 63 graduates from the country’s main teacher training programme at the University of Luxembourg took the required state exam to join the teaching ranks. The country needs 300 to 400 new fundamental schoolteachers per year to keep up with population growth. To help address this need, we draw on 10 years of admissions data (exam performance and noncognitive indicators) collected from candidates seeking entry to the University of Luxembourg’s teacher training programme. Our study investigates the major correlates, similarities and differences, between candidates that never-registered, i.e., candidates that after being admitted never start the programme; drop-outs, i.e., students that start but never finish; and of course, those that persist until completion. While circumstances may differ between these types of candidates, the first two nevertheless took-up the place that someone else who could have finished and possibly become a teacher. In light of the pressing need for more teachers, this study identifies important factors associated with showing up and staying in the programme until the end. Policy implications are described and discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailCheminformatics and Mass Spectrometry meets Clinical Metabolomics
Schymanski, Emma UL

Scientific Conference (2021, September 01)

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See detailHead, shoulders, Knie et pés – singing one’s way into multilingual practices. Language policies and practices in ECE
Kemp, Valérie; Colucci, Laura; Bebić, Džoen Dominique UL et al

Scientific Conference (2021, September)

While the European Commission (2011) has called for multilingual approaches in preschools and primary schools, their implementation is difficult and has rarely been studied (Kirsch et al. 2020 ... [more ▼]

While the European Commission (2011) has called for multilingual approaches in preschools and primary schools, their implementation is difficult and has rarely been studied (Kirsch et al. 2020). Multilingual language policies are likely to challenge traditional monolingual language ideologies and language hierarchies (Bergroth & Palviainen 2016, Ellis et al. 2011). The present paper looks at the non-formal early childhood education and care sector (ECEC) in multilingual Luxembourg, where a new plurilingual education programme has been implemented in 2017 (MENJE & SNJ 2018). It aims to develop skills in Luxembourgish (or French), familiarize children with French (or Luxembourgish) and value home languages. Furthermore, it encourages collaboration with parents and networking with social institutions (Kirsch & Seele 2020). The project COMPARE examines collaborative language and literacy practices with three-to-four-year-olds in crèches (day care centres in Luxembourg). This paper investigates the ways in which the educators in one crèche, helped by children’s parents, and the children themselves developed literacy activities in multiple languages and began to overcome monolingual ideologies. The data stem from seven video recordings totalling 29 minutes and fieldnotes written on four days over a period of three months. The data have been analysed with thematic analysis (Braun & Clarke 2006). Our preliminary results show that the educators included six of the children’s home languages by engaging the children and their parents in a range of activities. They developed an inclusive stance to language diversity and, like the children, learned words in different languages. Thanks to the good collaboration with parents, they received home-recorded videos which they integrated into their daily practices. Finally, they considered children’s, at times, reluctant attitudes towards languages other than the majority languages and found ways of opening up their minds to language diversity. Children became the driving motor for the new multilingual practices (Boyd & Huss 2017). The findings are relevant for policy-makers, researchers and professionals because they show means to develop collaborative and inclusive multilingual practices and overcome possible challenges. [less ▲]

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See detailStability of Value-Added Models: Comparing Classical and Machine Learning Approaches
Emslander, Valentin UL; Levy, Jessica UL; Scherer, Ronny et al

Scientific Conference (2021, September)

Background: What is the value that teachers or schools add to the evolution of students’ performance? Value-added (VA) modeling aims to answer this question by quantifying the effect of pedagogical ... [more ▼]

Background: What is the value that teachers or schools add to the evolution of students’ performance? Value-added (VA) modeling aims to answer this question by quantifying the effect of pedagogical actions on students’ achievement, independent of students’ backgrounds (e.g., Braun, 2005). A plethora of VA models exist, and several outcome measures are in use to estimate VA scores, yet without consensus on the model specification (Everson, 2017; Levy et al., 2019). Furthermore, it is unclear whether the most frequently used VA models (i.e., multi-level, linear regression, and random forest models) and outcome measures (i.e., language and mathematics achievement) indicate a similar stability of VA scores over time. Objectives: Drawing from the data of a highly diverse and multilingual school setting, where leveling out the influence of students’ backgrounds is of special interest, we aim to (a) clarify the stability of school VA scores over time; (b) shed light on the sensitivity toward different statistical models and outcome variables; and (c) evaluate the practical implications of (in)stable VA scores for individual schools. Method: Utilizing the representative, longitudinal data from the Luxembourg School Monitoring Programme (LUCET, 2021), we examined the stability of school VA scores. We drew on two longitudinal data sets of students who participated in the standardized achievement tests in Grade 1 in 2014 or 2016 and then again in Grade 3 two years later (i.e., 2016 and 2018, respectively), with a total of 5875 students in 146 schools. School VA scores were calculated using classical approaches (i.e., linear regression and multilevel models) and one of the most commonly used machine learning approaches in educational research (i.e., random forests). Results and Discussion: The overall stability over time across the VA models was moderate, with multilevel models showing greater stability than linear regression models and random forests. Stability differed across outcome measures and was higher for VA models with language achievement as an outcome variable as compared to those with mathematics achievement. Practical implications for schools and teachers will be discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailMoral Judgment in Video Games: Effects of Medium, Moral Intuitions and Media-Based Empathy
Grohmann, Lara; Holl, Elisabeth UL; Melzer, André UL

Scientific Conference (2021, September)

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See detailCharacterizing the Impact of Network Delay on Bitcoin Mining
Cao, Tong UL; Decouchant, Jérémie UL; Yu, Jiangshan et al

Scientific Conference (2021, September)

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See detailActionable knowledge and social learning for sustainability: Roles of professional knowledge and narratives
Hondrila, Kristina UL; König, Ariane UL

Scientific Conference (2021, September)

The contribution discusses why TD sustainability research would benefit from devoting more attention to professional knowledge and narratives. It presents concepts, empirical insights and methods on how ... [more ▼]

The contribution discusses why TD sustainability research would benefit from devoting more attention to professional knowledge and narratives. It presents concepts, empirical insights and methods on how this could be done. They are based on case studies on governance and social learning processes in two river basins in Luxembourg (post-2000) that have concerned challenges at the nexus of water, environment and agriculture and involved farmers, environmentalists and public water managers. [less ▲]

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See detailAn Integrative Model of Moral Processing for the Video Game Medium
Melzer, André UL; Holl, Elisabeth UL

Scientific Conference (2021, September)

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See detailClimate Risk and Price Jumps
Lehnert, Thorsten UL

Scientific Conference (2021, September)

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See detailMeta-Analytic Structural Equation Models of Executive Functions and Math Intelligence in Preschool Children
Emslander, Valentin UL; Scherer, Ronny

Scientific Conference (2021, September)

BACKGROUND: Response inhibition, attention shifting, and working memory updating are the three core executive functions (EFs; Miyake et al., 2000) underlying other cognitive skills that are relevant for ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Response inhibition, attention shifting, and working memory updating are the three core executive functions (EFs; Miyake et al., 2000) underlying other cognitive skills that are relevant for learning and everyday life. For example, they have shown to be differentially related to the mathematical component of intelligence (i.e., math intelligence) in school students and adults. While researchers suppose these three EFs to become more differentiated from early childhood to adulthood, neither the link of these constructs nor their structure has been conclusively established in preschool children yet. Primary studies on path models connecting EFs and math intelligence diverge in the exact relation of EFs and math intelligence. It remains unclear whether inhibition, shifting, and updating exhibit distinct but correlated constructs with respect to their relation to math intelligence. OBJECTIVES: With our meta-analysis, we aimed to (a) synthesize the relation between the three EFs and math intelligence in preschool children; and (b) compare plausible models of the effects of EFs on math intelligence. METHODS/RESULTS: Synthesizing data from 47 studies (363 effect sizes, 30,481 participants) from the last two decades via novel multilevel and multivariate meta-analytic models (Pustejovsky & Tipton, 2020), we found the three core EFs to be significantly related to math intelligence: Inhibition ("r" ̅ = .30, 95 % CI [.25, .35]), shifting ("r" ̅ = .32, 95 % CI [.25, .38]), and updating ("r" ̅ = .36, 95 % CI [.31, .40]). Looking at the three core EFs as one construct, the correlation was "r" ̅ = .34, 95 % CI [.31, .37]. Utilizing correlation-based, meta-analytic structural equation modeling (Jak & Cheung, 2020), our results exhibited significant relations of all EFs to math intelligence. These relations did not differ between the three core EFs. DISCUSSION: Our findings corroborate the positive link between EFs and math intelligence in preschool children and are similar to other age groups. From the model testing, we learned that representing EFs by a latent variable, thus capturing the covariance among the three core EFs, explained substantially more variation in math intelligence than representing them as distinct constructs. [less ▲]

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See detailDeveloping Multilingual Literacies – Views from four countries
Little, Sabine; Günther-van der Meij, Mirjam; Kirsch, Claudine UL et al

Scientific Conference (2021, September)

This paper reports on progress from an EERA-funded Network Grant (Network 31) at a European level across the EERA Network, which compares and contrasts policy contexts and ongoing research around ... [more ▼]

This paper reports on progress from an EERA-funded Network Grant (Network 31) at a European level across the EERA Network, which compares and contrasts policy contexts and ongoing research around multilingualism and literacy across four nations, specifically Germany, England, Luxembourg and the Netherlands. Children with ethnic minority background and low socio-economic status are more likely to have poor literacy skills and poorer academic outcomes (Farver et al., 2013). It is therefore essential to develop their preliteracy skills early because they are strong predictors of both their literacy development (e.g. Skibbe et al., 2011) and general educational attainment (Bialystok, 2013; Gogolin, 2014). Being biliterate has also been found to be a good predictor of successful additional language learning (Sanz, 2000). In multilingual contexts, students develop (multi)literacy skills in complex, ever changing contexts and through rich and heterogeneous experiences (Hammer et al., 2014). However, the linguistic resources of students with migrant background and lower socioeconomic status are often neglected throughout their school years, even though the languages in their repertoires provide valuable and mutually enriching resources. For example, bilinguals may strategically apply the acquired literacy skills in one language to write in another (Cenoz & Gorter, 2011). The omission to draw on the entire repertoire of multilinguals leads to inequality, which results in lower literacy outcomes and in discrepancies in competences in the various languages of bilinguals (Dworin, 2003). The quality of the home environment and institutions (e.g. early childhood and care) influences children’s language and literacy outcomes and predicts school success (NICHHD, 1998). Books remain the most favoured resource of multilingual families to engage children in literacy activities both in societal and the heritage languages, especially in the early years and early stages of education (Little, 2019). Studies in the field of home literacies have shown that parents, grandparents and children who engaged in book reading and in related activities such as telling and retelling stories, drew on their cultural funds of knowledge, made connections between the knowledge and skills gained in different learning contexts (e.g. home, school, community school), and blended the diverse literacy practices (Gregory, 2001). Engaging children in multilingual literacies does not only further their development of cognitive skills related to language and literacy but it also contributes to identity development. Projects where teachers and parents engage together with children in multilingual literacy activities, including multimodal digital ones, have shown that children are more motivated, engage deeper in their own learning and develop cognitive, language, and social skills, that teachers can work in more culturally and linguistically and inclusive way, and that parents feel more included in the school (Kirsch, 2018). [less ▲]

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See detailThreat Adaptive Byzantine Fault Tolerant State-Machine Replication
Simoes Silva, Douglas UL; Graczyk, Rafal UL; Decouchant, Jérémie et al

Scientific Conference (2021, September)

Critical infrastructures have to withstand advanced and persistent threats, which can be addressed using Byzantine fault tolerant state-machine replication (BFT-SMR). In practice, unattended cyberdefense ... [more ▼]

Critical infrastructures have to withstand advanced and persistent threats, which can be addressed using Byzantine fault tolerant state-machine replication (BFT-SMR). In practice, unattended cyberdefense systems rely on threat level detectors that synchronously inform them of changing threat levels. How- ever, to have a BFT-SMR protocol operate unattended, the state- of-the-art is still to configure them to withstand the highest possible number of faulty replicas f they might encounter, which limits their performance, or to make the strong assumption that a trusted external reconfiguration service is available, which introduces a single point of failure. In this work, we present ThreatAdaptive the first BFT-SMR protocol that is automatically strengthened or optimized by its replicas in reaction to threat level changes. We first determine under which conditions replicas can safely reconfigure a BFT-SMR system, i.e., adapt the number of replicas n and the fault threshold f, so as to outpace an adversary. Since replicas typically communicate with each other using an asynchronous network they cannot rely on consensus to decide how the system should be reconfigured. ThreatAdaptive avoids this pitfall by proactively preparing the reconfiguration that may be triggered by an increasing threat when it optimizes its performance. Our evaluation shows that ThreatAdaptive can meet the latency and throughput of BFT baselines configured statically for a particular level of threat, and adapt 30% faster than previous methods, which make stronger assumptions to provide safety. [less ▲]

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See detailBeyond the pandemic: Shaping of futures in (even more?) diverse educational settings - Critical discussion of contributions of invited symposium SIG 21
Max, Charles UL

Scientific Conference (2021, August 27)

Looking at SIG 21’s mission statement, the diversity of learning and education (which is / was ?) a granted element in educational research, seems to hail from a post/past century, where not everyone was ... [more ▼]

Looking at SIG 21’s mission statement, the diversity of learning and education (which is / was ?) a granted element in educational research, seems to hail from a post/past century, where not everyone was doing learningonline, remotely via the same tools and devices (i.e. zoom, etc.) Therefore, we wonder ifthe diversity still can be looked at in similar ways, and if so, which other ways of looking at the « new normal » should be developed, both from a practical, empirical research point of view, but also from a theoretical and epistemic perspective, underlying new research (or research into the new normal).Following this first line of thought, which questions could determine future research into education, educational settings and learning as such? This seems of particular interest, as the current ways of looking into education are heavily biased by concerns of technological infrastructure, investment and structural fitness (i.e., teachers as appexperts, networks, online setups, disregarding actual learners). Moreover, other ways of looking into formerly accepted « groups » (i.e., gender, age, background) seem to fall apart and disintegrate, making the issue of heterogeneity even more challenging to grapple with. Finally, when looking at the landscape of educational contexts and their societal anchorage at large (i.e., learning settings, formal/informal settings, mobility, development of professionals …) one aspect seems of particular interest: Is there learning in and from the actual situation ? How sustainable are the developments? Which perspectives can be drawn beyond the short term? [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of the COVID-pandemic:The role of family culture and effects on well-being
Minelli, Anne; Murdock, Elke UL; Albert, Isabelle UL

Scientific Conference (2021, August 27)

During the COVID pandemic governments across the globe put restrictions in place to curb the spread of the virus. During the strict lock-down phase, people were only permitted to leave the house for ... [more ▼]

During the COVID pandemic governments across the globe put restrictions in place to curb the spread of the virus. During the strict lock-down phase, people were only permitted to leave the house for essential reasons, and visiting of family members living in a different household was not allowed. The aim of the present study was to investigate possible effects of these COVID restrictions on well-being according to different family models. Extending Kağitçibasi’s (2007, 2013) postulated family model by Manzi et al.’s (2006) aspects of family cultures (enmeshment, cohesion, autonomy and social support) we first explored, if these family models can be replicated in Luxembourg. We then tested, if lock-down restrictions affected family models differently in terms of well-being. A total of N = 244 (Mage = 35 years, SD = 12.2; 73% female) completed our online questionnaire at the time of the strict lockdown in April-Mai 2020 in Luxembourg. To capture the impact of the pandemic, the questionnaire was divided into two parts. First, participants answered questions about their well-being, family culture and closeness to their parents in general. Participants were then reminded of COVID lockdown restrictions and asked to answer under these restrictions. Using cluster analysis we identified three family models, namely psychologically interdependent families (focus on cohesion and social support), independent families (focus on autonomy), and interdependent families (focus: enmeshment, cohesion and social support). The independent family cluster showed lower well-being before and during the pandemic compared to psychologically interdependent families. Our findings suggest that different family models as postulated by Kağitçibasi are indeed affected differently by the pandemic. Furthermore, there appears to be a particular association between cohesion and well-being. Implications of these findings will be discussed also in the family model framework. [less ▲]

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See detailLong-term effects of retention in grade 8 in Luxembourg
Klapproth, Florian; Keller, Ulrich UL; Fischbach, Antoine UL

Scientific Conference (2021, August 26)

Meta-analyses have suggested that grade retention rarely has positive effects and more often negative effects on students’ performance and psycho-emotional well-being. The occurrence of negative effects ... [more ▼]

Meta-analyses have suggested that grade retention rarely has positive effects and more often negative effects on students’ performance and psycho-emotional well-being. The occurrence of negative effects may be due to the absence of new learning experiences. However, in the short term, positive effects of grade retention are quite likely to occur. In Luxembourg, more than half of the students repeat at least one grade within their entire school career. Since grade retention is applied quite frequently, the aim of the current study was to examine long-term effects of grade retention. A representative sample of 2,835 Luxembourgish 8th grade students was used for this study, and propensity score matching was applied to select a control group of promoted students who were similar to the retained students on a variety of characteristics. Furthermore, a type of comparison was used by which the outcome variables of the retained and promoted students were compared at different times while the grade- and age-cohort were held equal between groups. With respect to school marks as an indicator of students’ academic achievement, this study showed that grade 8 retention lowered repeaters’ school marks, on average, in grades 10 to 13, as compared to matched non-repeaters. [less ▲]

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See detailNew Estimates of Inequality of Opportunity Across European Cohorts (and Some Insights on the Long-term Impact of Educational Policy)
Andreoli, Francesco; Fusco, Alessio; Kyzyma, Iryna et al

Scientific Conference (2021, August 25)

This paper provides a set of new estimates of inequality of opportunity (IOp) in Europe, using the European Union Statistics on Income and Living Condition (EU-SILC). Unlike previous research, we estimate ... [more ▼]

This paper provides a set of new estimates of inequality of opportunity (IOp) in Europe, using the European Union Statistics on Income and Living Condition (EU-SILC). Unlike previous research, we estimate inequality of opportunity within birth cohorts, which we argue is the most appropriate population level for inequality of opportunity analysis. Most IOp measures require estimation of the conditional distribution of the outcome of interest given circumstances. With multiple circumstances and the sample sizes available in EU-SILC, we use distribution regression methods combined with local kernel weighting and show how these can be used to estimate a large set of IOp measures. Endowed with cohort-level estimates of IOp, we finally examine the relationship between educational policy variables measured at the time of parental education and offspring generation inequality of opportunity in adulthood. We find a negative relationship between the duration of compulsory education of the parents and IOp among offspring, but the relationship is not very strong. [less ▲]

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See detailTeacher expectations and emotions concerning students with special needs or immigrant background
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Krischler, Mireille UL

Scientific Conference (2021, August 23)

Teachers are faced with increasingly heterogenous student groups, whereby the successful inclusion of all students largely depend on teachers´ competence and attitudes. Attitudes are understood as a ... [more ▼]

Teachers are faced with increasingly heterogenous student groups, whereby the successful inclusion of all students largely depend on teachers´ competence and attitudes. Attitudes are understood as a multifaceted construct with cognitive, affective and conative components. In the current study we investigated to what extent teachers´ expectations concerning students´ academic performance - reflecting the cognitive component of attitudes - varied as a function of specific student characteristics (special educational needs and immigrant background). In addition, we assessed teachers´ emotions - reflecting the affective component of attitudes - concerning the inclusion of these students in mainstream education. Result confirmed previous findings that teachers´ expectations and emotions vary as a function of student characteristics. Teachers had lower expectations of the academic performance of students with learning difficulties than students with challenging behaviour, whereby the estimates of German proficiency were also affected by the immigrant background of the student. Teachers felt however less positive about the inclusion of students with challenging behaviour than of students with learning difficulties, regardless of the immigrant background of the student. Results will be discussed in relation to theory and their practical implications. [less ▲]

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See detailNational and transnational family and friendship networks and their role for subjective well-being of older migrants compared to non-migrants in Luxembourg
Albert, Isabelle UL; Hoffmann, Martine; Vandenbosch, Petra et al

Scientific Conference (2021, August 18)

Creating new bonds in the receiving country constitutes an important developmental task for migrants. Nonetheless, migrants often have smaller social networks in the receiving countries compared to non ... [more ▼]

Creating new bonds in the receiving country constitutes an important developmental task for migrants. Nonetheless, migrants often have smaller social networks in the receiving countries compared to non-migrants, while they stay connected with left behind family members in their countries of origin. The role of transnational ties can thereby be twofold – on the one hand, transnational relations might provide support for migrants from a distance, on the other hand feelings of loneliness might arise when network partners are living far away. The present study is part of the project PAN-VAL on active ageing in Luxembourg, financed by the Ministry of Family and Integration, which focusses on social embeddedness vs. social isolation of migrants and non-migrants living in the multicultural context of Luxembourg. A national sample of N=1000 migrants and non-migrants 50+ living in Luxembourg were asked about their family and friendship networks, their satisfaction with family, friends and life as a whole as well as their feelings of loneliness. Further, N = 20 qualitative interviews with older migrants and non-migrants in four selected municipalities were carried out to explore social networks in more depth. First analyses revealed smaller national family and friendship networks of migrants compared to non-migrants and people with double nationality, whereas migrants reported more transnational bonds. Migrants also reported a lower satisfaction with family and friendship networks compared to non-migrants and people with double nationality, whereas no differences were found between migrants and non-migrants with regard to feelings of loneliness. However, people with double nationality felt less lonely compared to both other groups. Results will be discussed in a life-span perspective, considering the role of national family and friendship networks to create a sense belonging as a fundamental need of human beings. [less ▲]

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See detailA professional development course in translanguaging: Teachers’ beliefs and attitudes
Aleksic, Gabrijela UL

Scientific Conference (2021, August 16)

In multilingual Luxembourg there are almost 65% of 4 year-old children who do not speak Luxembourgish, of which 28% speak Portuguese (MENJE, 2018). The new law declared multilingual early education ... [more ▼]

In multilingual Luxembourg there are almost 65% of 4 year-old children who do not speak Luxembourgish, of which 28% speak Portuguese (MENJE, 2018). The new law declared multilingual early education mandatory in 2017 with the focus on developing Luxembourgish, familiarizing children with French and valuing their home languages. Thus, our project aimed to: (1) offer a professional development (PD) course in translanguaging pedagogy for preschool teachers, (2) involve children's families to strengthen home-school collaboration, and (3) foster children's cognitive, linguistic, and socio-emotional engagement in the classroom. We employed mixed methods. With teachers we used focus groups, questionnaires, and language portraits, with parents, questionnaires and interviews, and, with children test in early literacy and numeracy in school and home language as well as video observations. The main topic of our 18-hour course (June – December 2019) was translanguaging pedagogy divided into 7 sessions with the focus on multilingual ecology, home-school collaboration, multilingual brain, and multilingual oracy and literacy. We worked with 4 groups of 38 preschool teachers, of which two groups represented two entire schools. The focus of the current presentation are the results from teacher questionnaires and focus groups, delivered before and after the professional development course. The analysis of teacher questionnaires showed that there was a significant increase in positive attitudes towards children's home languages and multilingualism in general and a significant decrease in focus on Luxembourgish only, after the course. In addition, the results from the focus groups indicated that most of the teachers realized that the inclusion of children's home languages and cultures are important for their linguistic and socio-emotional development. However, the monolingual stance towards Luxembourgish for most of the teachers remained quite firm. References: Ministry of National Education, Childhood and Youth [MENJE]. (2018). Key numbers of the national education: statistics and indicators – School year 2016-2017. Retrieved from http://www.men.public.lu/fr/actualites/publications/themes-transversaux/statistiques-analyses/chiffres-cles/index.html [less ▲]

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See detailA conceptual model for understanding vulnerability in the context of migration
Gilodi, Amalia UL

Scientific Conference (2021, August 05)

The notion of ‘vulnerability’ is as popular as it is fuzzy. Its increased prominence in social research and in political and humanitarian discourses on migration has led many scholars and practitioners to ... [more ▼]

The notion of ‘vulnerability’ is as popular as it is fuzzy. Its increased prominence in social research and in political and humanitarian discourses on migration has led many scholars and practitioners to treat the concept as self-explanatory, without problematizing neither its conceptualization nor its use and possible negative societal and psychological consequences. Set within the framework of the EU-funded project MIMY (n°870700), investigating the processes of integration of young migrants in 9 European countries, this paper critically evaluates different conceptualizations and uses of vulnerability and proposes a new multilevel conceptual model for understanding vulnerability in the context of migration. Focusing on different levels of analysis, the model situates individuals and groups in the broader socio-political hierarchies and power dynamics that inevitably affect them (structural vulnerability), acknowledges how these systems are (re)produced in situated interpersonal relationships (situational vulnerability) and accounts for migrants’ biographical and psychological experiences of vulnerability. Focusing on the interrelationships between levels of analysis, the model highlights how macro conditions and definitions of vulnerability may affect individual experiences, through processes such as stigmatization, internalization of stereotypes, disempowerment, but also how individuals can actively negotiate their ascribed ‘vulnerability’ through processes such as resistance, mobilization and collective action. [less ▲]

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See detailOn the effects of income heterogeneity in monopolistically competitive markets”
Picard, Pierre M UL; Kichko, Sergey

Scientific Conference (2021, August)

This paper studies the e¤ects of income heterogeneity on monopolistically competitive product markets and welfare in the context of non-homothetic preferences. When richer individuals expenditures are ... [more ▼]

This paper studies the e¤ects of income heterogeneity on monopolistically competitive product markets and welfare in the context of non-homothetic preferences. When richer individuals expenditures are less sensitive to price change compared to poorer ones , a mean-preserving contraction of income distribution entices rms to charge higher prices, new rms enter and broaden product diversity. General equilibrium e¤ects have a negative impact on poorer individuals and, in speci c circumstances, on whole population. In open economies, lower income inequality in a country creates a price divergence between countries and decreases trade volumes and values. Those general equilibrium e¤ects are quantitatively non negligible. [less ▲]

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See detailDeparture and Trajectory Design Applications using Stretching Directions
Muralidharan, Vivek UL; Howell, Kathleen C.

Scientific Conference (2021, August)

Stable or nearly stable orbits do not always possess well-distinguished manifold structures that assist in departing from or arriving onto the orbit. Generally, for potential missions, the orbits of ... [more ▼]

Stable or nearly stable orbits do not always possess well-distinguished manifold structures that assist in departing from or arriving onto the orbit. Generally, for potential missions, the orbits of interest are nearly stable to reduce the possibility of rapid departure. The stable nature of these orbits also serves as a drawback for insertion or departure from the orbit. The Near Rectilinear Halo Orbits (NRHOs) and the Distant Retrograde Orbits (DROs) offer some potential long-horizon trajectories for exploration missions. The current investigation focuses on leveraging the stretching direction as a tool for departure and trajectory design applications. The magnitude of the state variations along the maximum stretching direction is expected to grow rapidly and, therefore, offers information for efficient departure from the orbit. Similarly, the maximum stretching in reverse time, enables arrival with a minimal maneuver magnitude. [less ▲]

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See detailVisual primes as culture-sensitive method to understanding acculturation processes
Murdock, Elke UL; Campill, Marc-Antoine; Valsiner, Jaan

Scientific Conference (2021, July 31)

One facet of contemporary societies is their increasingly divers composition. With a foreign population percentage of 47, 5 %, Luxembourg is an example for a super-diverse society and provides a rich ... [more ▼]

One facet of contemporary societies is their increasingly divers composition. With a foreign population percentage of 47, 5 %, Luxembourg is an example for a super-diverse society and provides a rich context to explore acculturation processes. The majority of immigrants have European roots, but the number of non-European immigrants is rising. Within this qualitative study we examined the identity construction processes of eight Japanese women living in Luxembourg using several visual primes guiding the interview. Building on Ying-yi Hong’s work on cultural mixing we developed hybrid images to evoke affective responses and to capture the negotiation processes between cultures. The choice of images was carefully prepared and first involved an ethnographic study of cultural dimensions of Japan and Luxembourg. Based on this analysis we decided to explore the domains of beauty, food, living, leisure and family. For each domain, we chose a prototypical European and Japanese image and created a hybrid image. All images were culturally meaningful and anchored in real life experiences. The Japanese images were tested in a pilot study in Japan. The interviews were carefully planned, each phase involving different visual stimuli. In the opening phase, the interviewer presented a business card in three different designs – European, Japanese and a mixed version. Interviewees could choose their preferred version and explain their choice. Next, a series of 15 matched typical images of Japan and Luxembourg were shown and the interviewees again chose their preferred images and explained their choice. Finally, the five sets of domain-specific images were presented. These provided a context for narration and especially the reaction to the hybrid stimuli showed how participants negotiate their cultural identities. The visual primes made the negotiation strategies visible. Findings from this study and the potential of this culture-sensitive method for accessing the process of acculturation will be discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailDeveloping a talent: An exploratory study of Talent Management in Russia
Usanova, Ksenia UL

Scientific Conference (2021, July 29)

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See detailSymposium: Immigrants‘ Acculturation across the Lifespan
Schwarz, Beate; Maehler, Debora; Murdock, Elke UL et al

Scientific Conference (2021, July 28)

Immigrants’ acculturation is a bi-linear process that refer to the orientation towards the host and the ethnic culture. Additionally, acculturation is a multidimensional construct that comprises changes ... [more ▼]

Immigrants’ acculturation is a bi-linear process that refer to the orientation towards the host and the ethnic culture. Additionally, acculturation is a multidimensional construct that comprises changes with respect to practices and behaviors, values and norms, and identity and identification (Schwartz, Unger, Zamboanga, & Szapocznik, 2010). From a developmental perspective, acculturation of first and second-generation immigrants differ remarkably because usually second generation immigrants have more opportunities to interact with representatives of the host culture in a phase of life with high plasticity (Sam & Oppedal, 2003). The symposium wants to gain insight into the complex acculturation processes with four studies that referred to different dimensions of acculturation and including age groups from adolescence to old age. The studies used quantitative and qualitative analyses and variable- as well as person-centered approaches. Starting with adolescence, Maehler provides a meta-analysis on factors that are related to identification with the ethnic and mainstream culture. Murdock and Gales also refer to the identity dimension of acculturation, here among young adults in Germany. With a qualitative approach they identified the role of the parents and the intergenerational relationships for the way how these young adults integrate both identities. In the third study with middle-aged second- generation immigrants in Switzerland, again intergenerational relationships are in the focus. Schwarz and Pfammatter analyzed the association of intergenerational relationships with orientations toward ethnic and mainstream culture. In the last study, Albert and colleagues used a person-centered approach. They investigated the patterns of sense of belonging on a local and national level of older immigrants in Luxembourg and the associations with expectations to stay and well-being. All four studies provide specific insight into the acculturation mechanism that are relevant in different periods of the lifespan. [less ▲]

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See detailMulticultural Identity Integration – the importance of the context of the family
Murdock, Elke UL; Gales, Sissy

Scientific Conference (2021, July 28)

Acculturation has been described as multidimensional process consisting of the confluence of different cultural practices, values and identifications. A growing body of research focuses on the ... [more ▼]

Acculturation has been described as multidimensional process consisting of the confluence of different cultural practices, values and identifications. A growing body of research focuses on the understanding identifications of persons growing up with multiple cultural experiences and how these influences are negotiated within themselves. The current study draws on a qualitative design and involved a semi-structured interview and two exercises designed to stimulate reflection on cultural influences. We recruited eight female participants, aged between 21 and 25 years, who all grew up in Germany. Their parents originate from a wide range of countries of various cultural distance to Germany. Fairly homogenous in terms of socioeconomic status and educational background, the sample was very diverse in terms of cultural influences. Half of our participants grew up in mixed national families. Building on the multicultural identity integration research we were particularly interested whether participants identify with one cultural group over others (categorization), keep their influences separate (compartmentalization) or link their cultural influences (integration) and drivers for each outcome. The results point towards the important role of parents regarding cultural resources and practices. Our results point to categorization, if there is little or no contact to one parent, compartmentalization, if the relationship between parents is conflicted and integration if both parents engage equally in cultural maintenance. Families are the primary socialization unit and our findings suggest that parental commitment to transfer of cultural values and practices impacts the cultural identity configurations. Findings will be discussed in a systemic perspective of identity construal processes. [less ▲]

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See detailRoma (2018) d’Alfonso Cuaron : “C’est seulement l’eau qui révèle la verité dans ce film”
Weber, Jean-Marie UL

Scientific Conference (2021, July 13)

Des vagues qui nous font jouir et qui nous apprennent à désirer Depuis ses débuts le cinéma semble l’art le plus apte à chercher, du côté de l’étrangeté, de l’indicible, de l’inconscient. C’est le « divan ... [more ▼]

Des vagues qui nous font jouir et qui nous apprennent à désirer Depuis ses débuts le cinéma semble l’art le plus apte à chercher, du côté de l’étrangeté, de l’indicible, de l’inconscient. C’est le « divan du pauvre », nous dit Guattari. En tout cas il est subversif comme la psychanalyse. Selon Slavoj Zizek il constitue un dispositif qui nous fait jouir et un lieu pédagogique qui nous apprend à désirer. Notre propos est de montrer à travers des extraits des films comme « Persona » de Bergman, « Breaking the Waves » de Lars von Trier, Silence de Scorsese , et « Les Quatre Cents Coups » de Truffaut, comment l’artiste nous confronte avec le réel et avec le fait qu’il n’y a plus de grand Autre. Ces scènes se jouent au bord de la mer, de l’étrangeté, finalement du traumatique. Touchés par la violence des vagues et la force du pulsionnel nous sommes confrontés avec notre regard, notre jouissance et notre désir. C’est en tant que « parlêtre » (Lacan), et plus spécifiquement en tant qu’être pulsionnel que nous nous rencontrons à travers de telles scènes. C’est finalement notre implication dans le film qui est questionnée dans notre intervention. [less ▲]

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See detailQuelles solutions face à l’impossibilité de former des paires de tandems ?
Lejot, Eve UL; Molostoff, Leslie UL

Scientific Conference (2021, July 12)

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See detailInteractive Narratives and Transmedia Storytelling: An Insight on Digital Exhibitions
Camarda, Sandra UL

Scientific Conference (2021, July 09)

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See detailPanel Organiser: Meeting the Editors: De Gruyter Book Series 'Migrations in History'
Venken, Machteld UL

Scientific Conference (2021, July 09)

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See detailOn the move within themselves – cultural distance and negotiation processes of cultural belonging
Murdock, Elke UL; Gales, Sissy

Scientific Conference (2021, July 08)

In a boundary crossing world, having exposure to multiple cultures is becoming norm rather than exception. Children of migrants and children born into mixed national families grow up with more than one ... [more ▼]

In a boundary crossing world, having exposure to multiple cultures is becoming norm rather than exception. Children of migrants and children born into mixed national families grow up with more than one cultural point of reference from birth. In the growing body of literature on bi- and multiculturalism different models of cultural acquisition are described, but still little is known about how the negotiation process takes place and what factors facilitate resolution and well-being. The present study builds on a recent theoretical framework on multicultural identity integration developed by Yampolsky et al. and investigates the role of cultural distance in the negotiation process for cultural belonging. For the present study, we conducted semi-structured interviews with eight young women (Mage = 22.6). All grew up in Germany, yet each had a very different other cultural background ranging from Chile, Columbia, France, Ghana, Hungary, Luxembourg, Russia to Sri Lanka. We asked participants about their sense of belonging, perceived similarities and differences between their cultural influences and their way of positioning themselves within these. Each interview was complemented by two visual exercises illustrating the sense of belonging. The results show that all participants engaged in active negotiation processes and arrived at very different solutions in terms of belonging. The cultural integration process depends on a multitude of factors – cultural distance being one, but parents playing an important role. The findings will be discussed in light of current acculturation models. Explanations will be provided with special focus on implications for migration and acculturation research. [less ▲]

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See detailSymposium: Crossing borders – feeling connected? An exploration of drivers influencing the development of a sense of belonging in the receiving society
Murdock, Elke UL; Albert, Isabelle UL; Decieux, Jean Philippe Pierre UL et al

Scientific Conference (2021, July 08)

Migrants face the complex task of establishing bonds with the receiving society. The development of a sense of belonging is linked to subjective wellbeing. The present panel investigates factors ... [more ▼]

Migrants face the complex task of establishing bonds with the receiving society. The development of a sense of belonging is linked to subjective wellbeing. The present panel investigates factors influencing the development of a sense of belonging. It brings together researchers from four different countries, applying different methodological approaches examining the development of belonging among different migrant groups. Jean Décieux explores the role of cultural distance in the host country adjustment process. Suggesting a multidimensional conceptualization of cultural distance, he presents findings based on recently migrated German nationals (N = 2856) drawn from the German Emigration and Remigration Panel Study (GERPS). The role of cultural distance in negotiating belonging among young migrant women growing up in Germany is the subject of Elke Murdock’s qualitative study. Results point to the important role of parents in the process. How parents’ commitment or lack of commitment affects their children’s construction of their sense of belonging is the focus of Anna Gruszczynska’s qualitative study among immigrant youth in the UK. She shows the fluctuating nature of the pursuit of belonging in time and space. Gry Paulgaard focuses on immigrants arriving in the rural space of Northern Norway. The project explores everyday life practices of refugees taking the materiality of a place as a starting point, acknowledging the interdependency between the social and material contexts for practice. Finally, Isabelle Albert investigates practices by older migrants living in multicultural Luxembourg, their engagement or otherwise in social practices and how this impacts on their sense of belonging. [less ▲]

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See detailVulnerability in the context of migration: a critical assessment of its conceptualizations and uses
Gilodi, Amalia UL; Albert, Isabelle UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Scientific Conference (2021, July 07)

The notions of ‘vulnerability’ and ‘vulnerable group’ have increasingly gained prominence in academic literature, policymaking, humanitarian debates and everyday discourses on migration and asylum. Its ... [more ▼]

The notions of ‘vulnerability’ and ‘vulnerable group’ have increasingly gained prominence in academic literature, policymaking, humanitarian debates and everyday discourses on migration and asylum. Its popularity, not limited to this field, has often led academics and practitioners to use ‘vulnerability’ as a self-explanatory condition or phenomenon. However, vulnerability is neither conceptually straight-forward nor politically and morally neutral. Multiple definitions and operationalizations of vulnerability exist across and within different fields of research and practice, without a common and systematic understanding of the concept. The notion of vulnerability can also be instrumentilised as a tool for discrimination, stigmatization, control, exclusion or even reduction of humanitarian assistance, when access to protection is restricted to ‘the most vulnerable’. In the context of the H2020 project MIMY (n°870700), this paper examines the multiplicities and hidden pitfalls behind different conceptualizations and uses of vulnerability and critically reflects on their implication for the study and governance of migration. By unpacking this concept, we hope to highlight both limitations and opportunities enclosed in the notion of vulnerability and encourage migration scholars to understand, address and take a stand before its complexities. Based on these considerations, a multilevel conceptual model of vulnerability in the specific context of migration is proposed. The model aims to capture several types and understandings of vulnerability and how these are (re)produced at different levels and by different actors, including migrants themselves. Particular attention is paid to migrants’ biographical and psychological experiences of vulnerability and how policy and political frameworks may affect them. [less ▲]

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