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See detailDynamic Spectrum Sharing in 5G Wireless Networks With Full-Duplex Technology: Recent Advances and Research Challenges
Sharma, Shree Krishna UL; Bogale, Tadilo Endeshaw; le, Long Bao et al

in IEEE Communications Surveys and Tutorials (2018), 20(1), 674-707

Full-duplex (FD) wireless technology enables a radio to transmit and receive on the same frequency band at the same time, and it is considered to be one of the candidate technologies for the fifth ... [more ▼]

Full-duplex (FD) wireless technology enables a radio to transmit and receive on the same frequency band at the same time, and it is considered to be one of the candidate technologies for the fifth generation (5G) and beyond wireless communication systems due to its advantages, including potential doubling of the capacity and increased spectrum utilization efficiency. However, one of the main challenges of FD technology is the mitigation of strong self-interference (SI). Recent advances in different SI cancellation techniques, such as antenna cancellation, analog cancellation, and digital cancellation methods, have led to the feasibility of using FD technology in different wireless applications. Among potential applications, one important application area is dynamic spectrum sharing (DSS) in wireless systems particularly 5G networks, where FD can provide several benefits and possibilities such as concurrent sensing and transmission (CST), concurrent transmission and reception, improved sensing efficiency and secondary throughput, and the mitigation of the hidden terminal problem. In this direction, first, starting with a detailed overview of FD-enabled DSS, we provide a comprehensive survey of recent advances in this domain. We then highlight several potential techniques for enabling FD operation in DSS wireless systems. Subsequently, we propose a novel communication framework to enable CST in DSS systems by employing a power control-based SI mitigation scheme and carry out the throughput performance analysis of this proposed framework. Finally, we discuss some open research issues and future directions with the objective of stimulating future research efforts in the emerging FD-enabled DSS wireless systems. [less ▲]

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See detailDynamic Super Resolution of Depth Sequences with Non-Rigid Motions
Al Ismaeil, Kassem UL; Aouada, Djamila UL; Mirbach, Bruno et al

in 20th International Conference on Image Processing (2013, September)

We enhance the resolution of depth videos acquired with low resolution time-of-flight cameras. To that end, we propose a new dedicated dynamic super-resolution that is capable to accurately super-resolve a ... [more ▼]

We enhance the resolution of depth videos acquired with low resolution time-of-flight cameras. To that end, we propose a new dedicated dynamic super-resolution that is capable to accurately super-resolve a depth sequence containing one or multiple moving objects without strong constraints on their shape or motion, thus clearly outperforming any existing super-resolution techniques that perform poorly on depth data and are either restricted to global motions or not precise because of an implicit estimation of motion. Our proposed approach is based on a new data model that leads to a robust registration of all depth frames after a dense upsampling. The texture-less nature of depth images allows to robustly handle sequences with multiple moving objects as confirmed by our experiments. [less ▲]

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See detailDynamic systems and the theoretical concept of problem solving in PISA 2012
Greiff, Samuel UL; Funke, Joachim

Scientific Conference (2010, September 28)

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See detailDynamic systems and their importance in competence assessment of problem solving
Funke, Joachim; Greiff, Samuel UL

Scientific Conference (2012, April 26)

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See detailDynamic systems and their importance in competence assessment of problem solving
Funke, Joachim; Greiff, Samuel UL; Wüstenberg, Sascha UL

Scientific Conference (2011, September)

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See detailDynamic Vehicular Routing in Urban Environments
Codeca, Lara UL

Doctoral thesis (2016)

Traffic congestion is a persistent issue that most of the people living in a city have to face every day. Traffic density is constantly increasing and, in many metropolitan areas, the road network has ... [more ▼]

Traffic congestion is a persistent issue that most of the people living in a city have to face every day. Traffic density is constantly increasing and, in many metropolitan areas, the road network has reached its limits and cannot easily be extended to meet the growing traffic demand. Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) is a world wide trend in traffic monitoring that uses technology and infrastructure improvements in advanced communication and sensors to tackle transportation issues such as mobility efficiency, safety, and traffic congestion. The purpose of ITS is to take advantage of all available technologies to improve every aspect of mobility and traffic. Our focus in this thesis is to use these advancements in technology and infrastructure to mitigate traffic congestion. We discuss the state of the art in traffic flow optimization methods, their limitations, and the benefits of a new point of view. The traffic monitoring mechanism that we propose uses vehicular telecommunication to gather the traffic information that is fundamental to the creation of a consistent overview of the traffic situation, to provision real-time information to drivers, and to optimizing their routes. In order to study the impact of dynamic rerouting on the traffic congestion experienced in the urban environment, we need a reliable representation of the traffic situation. In this thesis, traffic flow theory, together with mobility models and propagation models, are the basis to providing a simulation environment capable of providing a realistic and interactive urban mobility, which is used to test and validate our solution for mitigating traffic congestion. The topology of the urban environment plays a fundamental role in traffic optimization, not only in terms of mobility patterns, but also in the connectivity and infrastructure available. Given the complexity of the problem, we start by defining the main parameters we want to optimize, and the user interaction required, in order to achieve the goal. We aim to optimize the travel time from origin to destination with a selfish approach, focusing on each driver. We then evaluated constraints and added values of the proposed optimization, providing a preliminary study on its impact on a simple scenario. Our evaluation is made in a best-case scenario using complete information, then in a more realistic scenario with partial information on the global traffic situation, where connectivity and coverage play a major role. The lack of a general-purpose, freely-available, realistic and dependable scenario for Vehicular Ad Hoc Networks (VANETs) creates many problems in the research community in providing and comparing realistic results. To address these issues, we implemented a synthetic traffic scenario, based on a real city, to evaluate dynamic routing in a realistic urban environment. The Luxembourg SUMO Traffic (LuST) Scenario is based on the mobility derived from the City of Luxembourg. The scenario is built for the Simulator of Urban MObiltiy (SUMO) and it is compatible with Vehicles in Network Simulation (VEINS) and Objective Modular Network Testbed in C++ (OMNet++), allowing it to be used in VANET simulations. In this thesis we present a selfish traffic optimization approach based on dynamic rerouting, able to mitigate the impact of traffic congestion in urban environments on a global scale. The general-purpose traffic scenario built to validate our results is already being used by the research community, and is freely-available under the MIT licence, and is hosted on GitHub. [less ▲]

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See detailDynamical analysis of cellular networks based on the Green's function matrix
Perumal, Thanneer Malai UL; Wu, Yan; Gunawan, Rudiyanto

in Journal of Theoretical Biology (2009), 261(2), 248-59

The complexity of cellular networks often limits human intuition in understanding functional regulations in a cell from static network diagrams. To this end, mathematical models of ordinary differential ... [more ▼]

The complexity of cellular networks often limits human intuition in understanding functional regulations in a cell from static network diagrams. To this end, mathematical models of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) have commonly been used to simulate dynamical behavior of cellular networks, to which a quantitative model analysis can be applied in order to gain biological insights. In this paper, we introduce a dynamical analysis based on the use of Green's function matrix (GFM) as sensitivity coefficients with respect to initial concentrations. In contrast to the classical (parametric) sensitivity analysis, the GFM analysis gives a dynamical, molecule-by-molecule insight on how system behavior is accomplished and complementarily how (impulse) signal propagates through the network. The knowledge gained will have application from model reduction and validation to drug discovery research in identifying potential drug targets, studying drug efficacy and specificity, and optimizing drug dosing and timing. The efficacy of the method is demonstrated through applications to common network motifs and a Fas-induced programmed cell death model in Jurkat T cell line. [less ▲]

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See detailDynamical binding of proline-rich peptides to their recognition domains
Gu, Wei UL; Helms, V.

in Biochimica et Biophysica Acta-Proteins and Proteomics (2005), 1754(1-2), 232-238

Recognition of proline-rich sequences plays an important role for the assembly of multi-protein complexes during the course of eukaryotic signal transduction and is mediated by a set of protein folds that ... [more ▼]

Recognition of proline-rich sequences plays an important role for the assembly of multi-protein complexes during the course of eukaryotic signal transduction and is mediated by a set of protein folds that share characteristic features. For many complex systems containing proline-rich sequences, multiple binding modes have been found by theoretical and/or experimental studies. In this review, we discuss the different binding modes as well as the correlated dynamics of the peptides and their recognition domains, and some implications to their biological functions. Further-more, we give an outlook of the systems in the context of systems biology. (c) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailDynamical differential expression (DyDE) reveals the period control mechanisms of the Arabidopsis circadian oscillator
Mombaerts, Laurent UL; Carignano, Alberto; Robertson, Fiona et al

in PLoS Computational Biology (2019)

The circadian oscillator, an internal time-keeping device found in most organisms, enables timely regulation of daily biological activities by maintaining synchrony with the external environment. The ... [more ▼]

The circadian oscillator, an internal time-keeping device found in most organisms, enables timely regulation of daily biological activities by maintaining synchrony with the external environment. The mechanistic basis underlying the adjustment of circadian rhythms to changing external conditions, however, has yet to be clearly elucidated. We explored the mechanism of action of nicotinamide in Arabidopsis thaliana, a metabolite that lengthens the period of circadian rhythms, to understand the regulation of circadian period. To identify the key mechanisms involved in the circadian response to nicotinamide, we developed a systematic and practical modeling framework based on the identification and comparison of gene regulatory dynamics. Our mathematical predictions, confirmed by experimentation, identified key transcriptional regulatory mechanisms of circadian period and uncovered the role of blue light in the response of the circadian oscillator to nicotinamide. We suggest that our methodology could be adapted to predict mechanisms of drug action in complex biological systems. [less ▲]

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See detailDynamical fluctuations in a simple housing market model
Lemoy, Rémi UL; Bertin, Eric

in Journal of Statistical Mechanics : Theory and Experiment (2012)

We consider a simple stochastic model of an urban rental housing market, in which the interaction of tenants and landlords induces rent fluctuations. We simulate the model numerically and measure the ... [more ▼]

We consider a simple stochastic model of an urban rental housing market, in which the interaction of tenants and landlords induces rent fluctuations. We simulate the model numerically and measure the equilibrium rent distribution, which is found to be close to a lognormal law. We also study the influence of the density of agents (or equivalently, the vacancy rate) on the rent distribution. A simplified version of the model, amenable to analytical treatment, is studied and leads to a lognormal distribution of rents. The predicted equilibrium value agrees quantitatively with numerical simulations, while a qualitative agreement is obtained for the standard deviation. The connection with non-equilibrium statistical physics models such as ratchets is also emphasized. [less ▲]

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See detailDynamical hybrid modeling of human metabolism
Ben Guebila, Marouen UL

Doctoral thesis (2018)

Human metabolism plays a key role in disease pathogenesis and drug action. Half a century of biochemical literature leveraged by the advent of genomics allowed the emergence of computational modeling ... [more ▼]

Human metabolism plays a key role in disease pathogenesis and drug action. Half a century of biochemical literature leveraged by the advent of genomics allowed the emergence of computational modeling techniques and the in silico analysis of complex biological systems. In particular, Constraint-Based Reconstruction and Analysis (COBRA) methods address the complexity of metabolism through building tissue-specific networks in their steady state. It is known that biological systems respond to perturbations induced by pathogens, drugs or malignant processes by shifting their activity to safeguard key metabolic functions. Extending the modeling framework to consider the dynamics of these complex systems will bring simulations closer to observable human phenotypes. In this thesis, I combined physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models with genome-scale metabolic models (GSMMs) to form hybrid genome-scale dynamical models that provide a hypothesis-free framework to study the perturbations induced by one or more perturbagen on human tissues. On a first stage, these methodologies were applied to decipher the absorption of levodopa and amino acids by the intestinal epithelium and allowed to derive a model-based diet for Parkinson's Disease patients. In the next phase, we extended the study to 605 drugs in order to predict the occurrence of gastrointestinal side effects through a machine learning classifier, using a combination of gene expression and metabolic reactions set as features. Finally, the approach upscaled to several tissues, specifically to investigate the genesis of metabolic symptoms in type 1 diabetes and to suggest key metabolic players underlying within and between-individual variability to insulin action. Taken as whole, the integration of two modeling techniques constrained by expert biological knowledge and heterogeneous data types will be a step forward in achieving convergence in human biology. [less ▲]

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See detailDynamical Modeling Techniques for Biological Time Series Data
Mombaerts, Laurent UL

Doctoral thesis (2019)

The present thesis is articulated over two main topics which have in common the modeling of the dynamical properties of complex biological systems from large-scale time-series data. On one hand, this ... [more ▼]

The present thesis is articulated over two main topics which have in common the modeling of the dynamical properties of complex biological systems from large-scale time-series data. On one hand, this thesis analyzes the inverse problem of reconstructing Gene Regulatory Networks (GRN) from gene expression data. This first topic seeks to reverse-engineer the transcriptional regulatory mechanisms involved in few biological systems of interest, vital to understand the specificities of their different responses. In the light of recent mathematical developments, a novel, flexible and interpretable modeling strategy is proposed to reconstruct the dynamical dependencies between genes from short-time series data. In addition, experimental trade-offs and optimal modeling strategies are investigated for given data availability. Consistent literature on these topics was previously surprisingly lacking. The proposed methodology is applied to the study of circadian rhythms, which consists in complex GRN driving most of daily biological activity across many species. On the other hand, this manuscript covers the characterization of dynamically differentiable brain states in Zebrafish in the context of epilepsy and epileptogenesis. Zebrafish larvae represent a valuable animal model for the study of epilepsy due to both their genetic and dynamical resemblance with humans. The fundamental premise of this research is the early apparition of subtle functional changes preceding the clinical symptoms of seizures. More generally, this idea, based on bifurcation theory, can be described by a progressive loss of resilience of the brain and ultimately, its transition from a healthy state to another characterizing the disease. First, the morphological signatures of seizures generated by distinct pathological mechanisms are investigated. For this purpose, a range of mathematical biomarkers that characterizes relevant dynamical aspects of the neurophysiological signals are considered. Such mathematical markers are later used to address the subtle manifestations of early epileptogenic activity. Finally, the feasibility of a probabilistic prediction model that indicates the susceptibility of seizure emergence over time is investigated. The existence of alternative stable system states and their sudden and dramatic changes have notably been observed in a wide range of complex systems such as in ecosystems, climate or financial markets. [less ▲]

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See detailDynamical properties and characterization of gradient drift diffusions
Darses, Sébastien; Nourdin, Ivan UL

in Electronic Communications in Probability (2007), 12

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See detailDynamical strategies for obstacle avoidance during Dictyostelium discoideum aggregation: a Multi-agent system model
Proverbio, Daniele UL; Maggiora, Marco

E-print/Working paper (2019)

Chemotaxis, the movement of an organism in response to a chemical stimulus, is a typical feature of many microbiological systems. In particular, the social amoeba Disctyostelium discoideum is widely used ... [more ▼]

Chemotaxis, the movement of an organism in response to a chemical stimulus, is a typical feature of many microbiological systems. In particular, the social amoeba Disctyostelium discoideum is widely used as a model organism, but it is not still clear how it behaves in heterogeneous environments. A few models focused on mechanical features have already addressed the question; however, we propose that phenomenological models focusing on the dynamics may provide new meaningful data. Consequently, by means of a specific Multi-agent system model, we studied the dynamical features emerging from complex social interactions among individuals belonging to amoeboids colonies. After defining an appropriate metric to perform meaningful measurements, we found that: a) obstacles play the role of local topological perturbation, as they alter the flux of chemical signals; b) that obstacle that physically block the cellular motion as well as the chemicals elicit dynamical evolutions that are not statistically distinguishable from the case where obstacles that do not interfere physically with said motion; c) that fluctuations of the dynamics can lead to better exploration of the physical space, thus preventing multiple stable aggregates. From previous results, we may speculate about the fact that chemotactic cells, in many cases, can avoid obstacles by simply following the altered chemical gradient: social interactions seem to be sufficient to guarantee the aggregation of the whole colony past numerous obstacles. It is then unlikely that cells have developed special mechanisms to cope with the presence of topological perturbation sources. Nevertheless, we suggest that further studies can provide better understanding and that, in order to gain deeper knowledge, mechanical models should be coupled with phenomenological, system-oriented ones. [less ▲]

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See detailDynamical structure analysis of sparsity and minimality heuristics for reconstruction of biochemical networks
Howes, R.; Eccleston, L. J.; Goncalves, Jorge UL et al

in The proceedings of the 47th IEEE Conference on Decision and Control (2008)

Network reconstruction, i.e. obtaining network structure from input-output information, is a central theme in systems biology. A variety of approaches aim to obtaining structural information from ... [more ▼]

Network reconstruction, i.e. obtaining network structure from input-output information, is a central theme in systems biology. A variety of approaches aim to obtaining structural information from available data. Previous work has introduced dynamical structure functions as a tool for posing and solving the network reconstruction problem. Even for linear time invariant systems, reconstruction requires specific additional information not generated in the typical system identification process. This paper demonstrates that such extra information can be obtained through a limited sequence of system identification experiments on structurally modified systems, analogous to gene silencing and overexpression experiments. In the absence of such extra information, we discuss whether combined assumptions of network sparsity and minimality contribute to the recovery of the network dynamical structure. We provide sufficient conditions for a transfer function to have a completely decoupled minimal realization, and demonstrate that every transfer function is arbitrarily close to one that admits a perfectly decoupled minimal realization. This indicates that the assumptions of sparsity and minimality alone do not lend insight into the network structure. [less ▲]

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See detailDynamical Structure Function and Granger Causality: Similarities and Differences
Yue, Zuogong UL; Thunberg, Johan UL; Yuan, Ye et al

in 54th IEEE Conference on Decision and Control, Osaka, Japan, December 15-18, 2015 (2015)

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See detailDynamical structure function identifiability conditions enabling signal structure reconstruction
Adebayo, J.; Southwick, T.; Chetty, V. et al

in The proceedings of the 51st IEEE Conference on Decision and Control (CDC) (2012, December)

Networks of controlled dynamical systems exhibit a variety of interconnection patterns that could be interpreted as the structure of the system. One such interpretation of system structure is a system's ... [more ▼]

Networks of controlled dynamical systems exhibit a variety of interconnection patterns that could be interpreted as the structure of the system. One such interpretation of system structure is a system's signal structure, characterized as the open-loop causal dependencies among manifest variables and represented by its dynamical structure function. Although this notion of structure is among the weakest available, previous work has shown that if no a priori structural information is known about the system, not even the Boolean structure of the dynamical structure function is identifiable. Consequently, one method previously suggested for obtaining the necessary a priori structural information is to leverage knowledge about target specificity of the controlled inputs. This work extends these results to demonstrate precisely the a priori structural information that is both necessary and sufficient to reconstruct the network from input-output data. This extension is important because it significantly broadens the applicability of the identifiability conditions, enabling the design of network reconstruction experiments that were previously impossible due to practical constraints on the types of actuation mechanisms available to the engineer or scientist. The work is motivated by the proteomics problem of reconstructing the Per-Arnt-Sim Kinase pathway used in the metabolism of sugars. [less ▲]

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See detailDynamical structure functions for the reverse engineering of LTI networks
Goncalves, Jorge UL; Howes, R.; Warnick, S.

in Proceedings of the 46th IEEE Conference on Decision and Control (2007)

This research explores the role and representation of network structure for LTI systems with partial state observations. We demonstrate that input-output representations, i.e. transfer functions, contain ... [more ▼]

This research explores the role and representation of network structure for LTI systems with partial state observations. We demonstrate that input-output representations, i.e. transfer functions, contain no internal structural information of the system. We further show that neither the additional knowledge of system order nor minimality of the true realization is generally sufficient to characterize network structure. We then introduce dynamical structure functions as an alternative, graphical-model based representation of LTI systems that contain both dynamical and structural information of the system. The main result uses dynamical structure to precisely characterize the additional information required to obtain network structure from the transfer function of the system. [less ▲]

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See detailDynamics and feedback loops in the transforming growth factor beta signaling pathway.
Wegner, Katja; Bachmann, Anastasia; Schad, Jan-Ulrich et al

in Biophysical chemistry (2012), 162

Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) ligands activate a signaling cascade with multiple cell context dependent outcomes. Disruption or disturbance leads to variant clinical disorders. To develop ... [more ▼]

Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) ligands activate a signaling cascade with multiple cell context dependent outcomes. Disruption or disturbance leads to variant clinical disorders. To develop strategies for disease intervention, delineation of the pathway in further detail is required. Current theoretical models of this pathway describe production and degradation of signal mediating proteins and signal transduction from the cell surface into the nucleus, whereas feedback loops have not exhaustively been included. In this study we present a mathematical model to determine the relevance of feedback regulators (Arkadia, Smad7, Smurf1, Smurf2, SnoN and Ski) on TGF-beta target gene expression and the potential to initiate stable oscillations within a realistic parameter space. We employed massive sampling of the parameters space to pinpoint crucial players for potential oscillations as well as transcriptional product levels. We identified Smad7 and Smurf2 with the highest impact on the dynamics. Based on these findings, we conducted preliminary time course experiments. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Dynamics Implications of Liberalizing Global Migration
Delogu, Marco UL

E-print/Working paper (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 90 (11 UL)