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See detailLa cultura como imaginación social
Dembeck, Till UL; Espino Barrera, Tomás

in Theorie Now. Journal of Literature, Critique, and Thought (2020), 3(2), 117132

Detailed reference viewed: 42 (1 UL)
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See detailCultural and language effects on measures of vocabulary and working memory
Engel de Abreu, Pascale UL; Baldassi, M

Scientific Conference (2011, June)

Two studies are presented exploring whether performance on assessments of working memory (WM) and vocabulary is affected by the experience with the test language and/or the linguistic and cultural status ... [more ▼]

Two studies are presented exploring whether performance on assessments of working memory (WM) and vocabulary is affected by the experience with the test language and/or the linguistic and cultural status of the child. Forty 7-year-old Portuguese-speaking immigrant children growing up in Luxembourg were assessed on a range of L1 and L2 vocabulary measures and verbal WM tests. Their data was compared to monolingual speakers of Luxembourgish and Portuguese from different socioeconomic background (SES) groups. Results showed that WM is highly associated with vocabulary in both native and foreign languages. Furthermore, the study indicates that WM tests are relatively independent of SES, test language, and immigrant/language status. In contrast, results on the vocabulary measures have shown that bilingual immigrant children perform equally well to monolinguals if their combined vocabulary across languages is considered but lack behind their monolingual peers in terms of conceptual development. The data suggests that bilingual immigrants’ poor conceptual knowledge is not simply a reflection of lower SES but instead seems to be a direct consequence of growing up as an immigrant in a multilingual environment. The results of this study have important practical utility especially in relation to improving the range of culture-fair assessment tools that can be used with minority language children. As WM measures are highly associated with children’s language learning and are relatively independent of test language, language status, and SES, these tests might provide valuable tools for distinguishing between language impairments of a cognitive origin and language differences related to the environmental context of growing up as an immigrant with several languages. This distinction is crucial in order to avoid erroneous diagnostics and provide appropriate remediational support that help immigrant children overcome their langue differences in order to improve their chances of accessing the same opportunities and resources as their majority culture peers. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 112 (3 UL)
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See detailCultural and regional integration. The case of the Saar-Lor-Lux cross-border labour market
Dörrenbächer, Peter; Schulz, Christian UL

in KOTER, Marek; HEFFNER, Krystian (Eds.) Multicultural Regions and Cities (1999)

Detailed reference viewed: 102 (6 UL)
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See detailCultural Awareness in Multilingual Education
Byram, Michael UL

in The Encyclopedia of Applied Linguistics (2012)

“Cultural awareness,” as a quick Internet search will show, is a widely used phrase and consequently has no single precise meaning. It is used to refer to awareness of diversity within a society and among ... [more ▼]

“Cultural awareness,” as a quick Internet search will show, is a widely used phrase and consequently has no single precise meaning. It is used to refer to awareness of diversity within a society and among societies. It is often associated with “training,” involving specific activities which draw attention to diversity and encourage and deliberately develop positive attitudes and understanding. Such training is directed at adults in their professional and working lives. It is linked through this to “intercultural competence” which is based in part on heightened cultural awareness and which is itself fundamental to “intercultural communication.” This field of activity and study is well enough established to have spawned “handbooks” (e.g., Straub, Weidemann, & Weidemann, 2007; Deardorff, 2009) and many textbooks (e.g., Holliday, Hyde, & Kullman, 2004; Jandt, 2004; Chen & Starosta, 2005). [less ▲]

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See detailCultural conditions in the adaptation of a global ideology: New Maths reform in Luxembourg in the 1960’s and 1970’s
Nadimi Amiri, Shaghayegh UL

Scientific Conference (2015, June 26)

The idea that the modern mathematics can help pupil to become more intelligent or rational as the future citizens, was initiated in the United States after the WWII and accelerated after the launch of ... [more ▼]

The idea that the modern mathematics can help pupil to become more intelligent or rational as the future citizens, was initiated in the United States after the WWII and accelerated after the launch of Sputnik by the USSR. As a part of martial plan, the United States introduced this idea in Europe through the so-called Royaumont Seminar in 1959. The seminar with the title “New thinking in school mathematics” was organized by the Organisation for European Economic Co-operation (OEEC) and chaired by the American mathematician Dr. Marshall Stone in Royaumont Abbey in Paris. This seminar recommended its member countries to proceed with a reform in their mathematics teaching. Dr. Stone expressed the need for this reform “deep and urgent” (OEEC, 1961, p. 29). Luxembourg was also one of the first nations to participate in these international curricular activities including the Royaumont Seminar (OECD, 1961, p. 215). The development of maths and sciences education became an issue for the country to such an extent that Pierre Frieden, the prime minister of Luxembourg in 1958, proclaimed: “Those, who have the best scientists will win the Cold War … [and] the economic war!” (LW February 27, 1958, p. 3), thus underscoring the need for Luxembourg’s to participate in the reform movement. This paper is part of a research project that studies how New Math was adapted for Luxembourgish primary schools. It works to reveal how a ‘globally’-disseminated idea about how mathematics relates to the ideology of the rational and critical citizen has been implemented in Luxembourg by translating it into its cultural idiosyncrasy. Many Luxembourgian mathematicians attempted to adapt conceptions of the new mathematics for the elementary levels during the 1960s and 1970s. Alongside, these mathematicians were also active in participating and even hosting conferences focusing on the subject of New Maths reform in that era. However, despite all these efforts, the new mathematics officially entered Luxembourg’s primary school textbooks twenty years after the Royaumont seminar. The research data is drawn from relevant archival records including reports, correspondences, teachers’ journals, local newspaper articles, texts of laws, non-official and official relevant school-books of the era in Luxembourg. In addition, I also look at the handbooks of the new mathematics conceptions suggested in the US, in order to have a comparison to see how the suggested conceptions were adapted to serve values and expectations in Luxembourg. My study shows that in one hand, Luxembourg had a very tight cooperation with OEEC/OECD, and on the other hand, there was the local culture and beliefs about the role of mathematics and the expectation from the future citizens. Besides the restriction that multilingualism made for preparing textbooks, moral and religious values also played their tremendous roles. In that situation, Luxembourgian educational-policy makers had to go through many delicate and time-consuming dialogues which are an interesting area of study. In this paper, I study how the ideology of New Math has been justified and adapted to be acceptable in the Luxembourgish culture.   [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 68 (2 UL)
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See detailCultural differences and immigrants' wages
Raux, Morgan UL

E-print/Working paper (2021)

In this paper, I investigate how cultural differences affect the labor-market performance of immigrant workers in Germany. I document a negative relationship between hourly wages and the cultural distance ... [more ▼]

In this paper, I investigate how cultural differences affect the labor-market performance of immigrant workers in Germany. I document a negative relationship between hourly wages and the cultural distance between immigrants' countries of origin and Germany. This result is robust across the three main indicators used in the gravity literature: linguistic, religious, and genetic distances. This cultural wage penalty disappears after five to ten years spent in Germany. Controlling for language proficiency as well as for selective in- and out-migration, these results highlight the cultural integration of immigrant workers. I finally provide evidence suggesting that lower wage progression may be explained by fewer job-to-job transitions. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 175 (24 UL)
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See detailCultural differences in creativity: The role of immigration
de Vries, Herie; Kirsch, Christiane UL; Furnham, Adrian

in International Journal for Talent Development and Creativity (2014)

This study analyses the relationship between creativity and personality in different cultural contexts. A multivariate approach to creativity implies that personal and contextual characteristics influence ... [more ▼]

This study analyses the relationship between creativity and personality in different cultural contexts. A multivariate approach to creativity implies that personal and contextual characteristics influence creative performance. Is the relationship between creativity and personality the same in different cultural contexts? Within education the cultural factor might have more impact than in other environments because of assimilationism of migrant students. This study is carried out in London and the Greater Region of Luxembourg. The sample consists of 243 participants (199 women, 44 men, MAge = 20.35, SD = 1.56, age range: 18-32 years). Whereas the correlation between creativity and openness is positive for non-immigrants (European), it is negative for immigrants (non-European). This highly surprising exploratory result can be related to migration. A possible mediator between creativity and openness might be individual differences linked to migration, i.e. uncertainty avoidance. Implications of results will be discussed. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 178 (3 UL)
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See detailCultural European Heritage and Music (Education)
Sagrillo, Damien UL

Scientific Conference (2015, May 13)

Detailed reference viewed: 47 (0 UL)
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See detailCultural Factors Currently Affecting Inclusive Practice – Europe
Heck, Sandra UL; Fitzgerald, Hayley; Solenes, Oskar et al

in Heck, Sandra; Block, Martin (Eds.) Inclusive Physical Education around the World: Origins, Cultures, Practices (2019)

This chapter presents a brief comparison of inclusive practice in physical activity and education from four European national/regional perspectives – the United Kingdom, Germany, Italy and Norway ... [more ▼]

This chapter presents a brief comparison of inclusive practice in physical activity and education from four European national/regional perspectives – the United Kingdom, Germany, Italy and Norway/Scandinavia. The contributions are unified in as much as they suggest a common sense of purpose and philosophy; that difference should be recognized and welcomed and accommodation through changes in policy and practice put in place to ensure a broad and balanced physical education and sport experience for all young people. The UK section wrestles with the issue that terminology around inclusion has inhibited a clear direction but also emphasizes the significant role played by education in driving change. The section on Germany further reinforces the crucial importance of embedding inclusive practice in the education context but also highlights the variations in policy that can be endemic in a federal system. The Italy and Norway/Scandinavia contributions show how declarations agreed at international level can influence policy and affect practice on the ground in markedly different ways; in both, a focus on the needs of the individual is key. Whatever the approach, in all cases inclusion is primarily viewed as a fundamental human right. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 43 (3 UL)
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See detailCultural Heritage Archives and Research Prospects
Janz, Nina UL

Presentation (2020, November 27)

Cultural Heritage - Definitions and Approach in Archives and in Academic Research

Detailed reference viewed: 95 (1 UL)
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See detailCultural Heritage, Diversity, Functionality, Education of Music in a European Context
Sagrillo, Damien UL

in Buzás, Zsuzsanne; Brusniak, Friedhelm; Marshall, Nigel (Eds.) et al Music Education in the Focus of Historical Concepts and New Horizons (2019)

Detailed reference viewed: 78 (8 UL)
See detailCultural identity and values in intergenerational movement: The multicultural case of the Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg
Barros Coimbra, Stephanie UL

Doctoral thesis (2020)

Migration flows have led to an increase in questions about the multiple cultural influences on individuals. The resulting demographic changes raise in many host societies essential questions related to ... [more ▼]

Migration flows have led to an increase in questions about the multiple cultural influences on individuals. The resulting demographic changes raise in many host societies essential questions related to national belonging, and thus to cultural identity and value systems. While migrating to a new cultural environment, migrant individuals face several challenges and they have to negotiate several developmental tasks using self-regulatory strategies, with correspondingly different psychological outcomes. These issues become even more important in a country such as Luxembourg with a high migrant proportion (47%; Statec, 2019). Little is still known about how second-generation adults who have grown up in immigrant families negotiate the double cultural identity, and about their value profiles compared to the local populations of the country of origin and receiving country. Four diverse subsamples were used out of the broader IRMA project pool, depending on the different objectives of the four studies. In total, N = 506 participants from three cultural subgroups ( LU natives, PT migrants in Luxembourg & PT natives in Portugal) participated in the quantitative part of the IRMA project ( LuN: n = 179; PtM: n = 209 & PtN: n = 118), and N = 20 took part in the qualitative part (n = 10 PtM dyads & n = LuN dyads). Study 1 highlighted the importance of the migration experience as a life-disruptive event that has impacts on individual and family cultures, as well as value systems during the life of migrant families. Study 2, looking specifically at PT migrant families, found a generational gap in terms of adult children’s higher attachment to the receiving culture as well as stronger tendencies towards a compatible identity orientation compared to their respective parents. However, the qualitative part of Study 2 revealed ambivalent feelings about double cultural belonging amongst the Portuguese second-generation adult children. Study 3 therefore focused on the latter and identified four ways of dealing with double cultural frames - blended, alternated, separated (Phinney & Devich-Navarro, 1997) - and expanded the model by identifying a fourth cluster of ambivalent cultural identity. In addition, the survey analyzed how their cultural identity profiles enabled them to achieve personally or socially meaningful goals and values. Blended biculturals used mainly primary regulatory control strategies, which were linked to the most positive psychological outcomes (higher self-esteem & well-being, and low acculturation stress). The ambivalent cluster was the least successful in terms of psychological outcomes (low self-esteem & well-being, and high acculturative stress) using both primary and secondary compensatory regulatory strategies. Study 4, an intercultural comparison between two family generations – one adult child and two elder parents – within three different cultural subgroups – LuN, PtM and PtN – aimed to better disentangle the effects of family, culture and immigration, and thus investigate the different cultural influences and messages reflected in the processes of transmission of values and value profiles. Overall, findings of Study 4 revealed the existence of an intergenerational gap between elder parents and their respective adult children; the presence of a cultural gap between the three cultural subgroups studied, which could be explained by both culture of origin and migration, with specifically an acculturation gap in the sub-sample of Portuguese migrants; and a moderate relative intergenerational transmission across cultures. The latter thus allows for a certain cultural persistence and continuity of a society and its cultural system (Trommsdorff et al., 2004) while allowing for cultural flexibility over generations that could be important for family identity and beneficial for well-being far more than a mere exact reproduction of values over generations (Barni & Donato, 2018). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 168 (22 UL)
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See detailCultural phenomenology and social relevance
Valsiner, Jaan UL

in Omi, Yasuhiro; Rodriguez, Lilian Patricia; Peralta-Gómez, María Claudia (Eds.) Lives and relationships: Culture in transition between social roles (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 47 (0 UL)
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See detailCultural Psychological Re-Formulation of Ego-Defence into Ego-Construction
Mihalits, Dominik Stefan UL

Doctoral thesis (2020)

The developing self is a complex concept that recurrently occupies a variety of academic disciplines, and that is yet to be clarified from a holistically, transdisciplinary standpoint. For instance ... [more ▼]

The developing self is a complex concept that recurrently occupies a variety of academic disciplines, and that is yet to be clarified from a holistically, transdisciplinary standpoint. For instance, psychoanalytical theories offer detailed insight into the intraindividual psycho-dynamics of personal development. Cultural psychological theories, on the other hand, stress a culture’s influence on a person’s day-to-day development and advance a detailed account of semiotic, i.e., culturally mediated, sign construction that underlies psychological process-es and results from it at the same time. Importantly, and what a cultural psychological standpoint therefore offers, is a view on culture that withdraws from conceiving it as an own entity (e.g., cannot be calculated as an external factor), but views it as deeply entangled with the formation of personality development. Both theory strands thus each complexly address ‘sides of the same coin’, namely the phenomenon of the developing self, but have not yet been systematically linked with each other from a holistic perspective. Therefore, this thesis addresses the question, how an integrative perspective of psychoanalytical psychodynamics can be synthesized with cultural psychological metatheory on development. More precisely, I theoretically explore how psychoanalytical theories of ego defence mechanisms help furthering an analysis of ego construction. By using the concept of ego construction, I argue that cultural psychological construction processes that are entangled with people’s engagement with their culturally laden environments can further elaborate psychoanalytical theories on ego defence. To approach ego defence, this project departs from Freudian psychoanalytic theory. It draws on the differentiation between needs and wishes that leads to an inner tension where defence mechanisms help in understanding the tension upon delayed gratification. Pushing beyond this traditional perspective and by assuming a high entanglement of needs and wishes, the defence needs to be recognized as an ongoing process, conceptualized as a continuous and recurring process rather than as mechanisms. It is a central conclusion of this Ph.D. project that, therefore, concepts of defence must leave their descriptive level to overcome the problem of cause and effect, allowing an understanding of development as open psychodynamic and cultural system. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 212 (10 UL)
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See detailCultural psychology and its future: Complementarity in a new key
Valsiner, Jaan UL

in Wagoner, Brady; Chaudhary, Nandita; Hviid, Pernille (Eds.) Cultural psychology and its future: Complementarity in a new key (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 77 (0 UL)
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See detailCultural psychology of transgenerational family relations: Investigating ambivalences
Albert, Isabelle UL; Abbey, Emily; Valsiner, Jaan UL

Book published by IAP (2018)

The present volume deals with the experience of ambivalence in family relations - a well-known phenomenon that has inspired more and more research and theorizing in the last years but that is however ... [more ▼]

The present volume deals with the experience of ambivalence in family relations - a well-known phenomenon that has inspired more and more research and theorizing in the last years but that is however sometimes difficult to capture. Bringing together junior and senior researchers from different parts of the world, ideas on theory and research are elaborated following qualitative and quantitative approaches. This book thus contributes to theory-building as well as outlining research results and helping to develop measurement in interpersonal and intergenerational relations. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 235 (15 UL)
See detailCultural realities of being: Abstract ideas within everyday lives
Valsiner, Jaan UL; Chaudhary, Nandita; Anandalakshmy, S.

Book published by Routledge (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 106 (0 UL)
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See detailCultural representation in Luxembourgish street naming practices
Purschke, Christoph UL

in Linguistics Vanguard (2021), 7(s5), 111

Detailed reference viewed: 38 (1 UL)
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See detailThe Cultural Transmission of Environmental Preferences: Evidence from International Migration
Litina, Anastasia UL; Zanaj, Skerdilajda UL; Moriconi, Simone

Scientific Conference (2014, July 15)

This paper investigates both theoretically and empirically the hypothesis that individual environmental attitudes can be partly accounted for by a cultural component. To empirically identify this ... [more ▼]

This paper investigates both theoretically and empirically the hypothesis that individual environmental attitudes can be partly accounted for by a cultural component. To empirically identify this component, we exploit variation associated with international migration flows. We find that the environmental attitudes of migrants, while being resilient to environmental conditions, also embed a cultural component, which persists till the second generation migrants. Our results suggest that, in the presence of multiple environmental problems that require collective action, comprehending the driving forces behind the formation of an environmental culture is critical to design effective policies. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 83 (8 UL)