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See detailCorporate Social Responsibility and Firms’ Ability to Collude
Tampieri, Alessandro UL; Lambertini, Luca

in Board directors and Corporate Social Responsibility (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 77 (3 UL)
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See detailCorporate Social Responsibility and Pro ts: Friends or Foes? Evidence from Europe
Tampieri, Alessandro UL; Sartarelli, Marcello

Scientific Conference (2015, June 30)

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See detailCorporate Sustainability in Asset Pricing Models and Mutual Funds Performance Measurement
Walker, Thomas; Lopatta, Kerstin UL; Kaspereit, Thomas UL

in Financial Markets and Portfolio Management (2014), 28(4), 363-407

This study explores whether corporate sustainability is a relevant factor in multifactor asset pricing models. It contributes to the literature on asset pricing, as well as to the literature that examines ... [more ▼]

This study explores whether corporate sustainability is a relevant factor in multifactor asset pricing models. It contributes to the literature on asset pricing, as well as to the literature that examines how sustainability impacts capital markets, by constructing a new factor that captures differences in the returns of sustainable and non-sustainable firms. Specifically, it examines whether an additional sustainability factor has explanatory power in asset pricing models that include size, book-to-market equity, and momentum factors. This research has practical implications for the performance measurement of portfolios and mutual funds that are managed in accordance with sustainability criteria in that it disentangles general stock-picking skills from the differences in returns between sustainable and non-sustainable stocks. [less ▲]

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See detailCorporate Tax Residence: Luxembourg National Report
Pantazatou, Aikaterini UL

in Traversa, Edoardo (Ed.) Corporate Tax Residence and Mobility (2018)

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See detailCorporate Technologies
Zetzsche, Dirk Andreas UL; Enriques, Luca

E-print/Working paper (2020)

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See detailCorporate Technologies - Zur Digitalisierung im Aktienrecht
Zetzsche, Dirk Andreas UL

in Aktiengesellschaft (Die) (2019), 2019(1), 1-17

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See detailCorporations and Human Rights: Searching for International Norms for Corporate Conduct in Domestic Case Law
Baglayan, Basak UL

Doctoral thesis (2017)

Recent years have seen much debate concerning the interplay between human rights and corporations. Part of that debate has focused on corporate violations of human rights norms and possible legal ... [more ▼]

Recent years have seen much debate concerning the interplay between human rights and corporations. Part of that debate has focused on corporate violations of human rights norms and possible legal accountability mechanisms for such breaches. The present research is concerned with one such accountability mechanism, namely litigation before domestic courts seeking to enforce corporations’ international obligations and the complaints before the OECD National Contact Points (‘NCPs’). The thesis analyses how domestic courts and the OECD NCPs have conceptualised and implemented corporations’ human rights obligations. It is premised on the assumption that, through their application of international norms in their particular national context, these institutions act to crystallize and clarify the ambit of such norms. [less ▲]

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See detailCorporations and International Lawmaking
Baglayan, Basak UL

Presentation (2016, April)

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See detailCorps et sainteté au Moyen Âge
Vomacka, Eloïse UL

Scientific Conference (2012)

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See detail« Le corps féminin comme lieu de contamination : sorcellerie et possession »
Freyermuth, Sylvie UL; Bonnot, Jean-François Pierre

in Adam, Véronique; Revol-Marzouk, Lise (Eds.) La contamination. Lieux symboliques et espaces imaginaires (2012)

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See detailCorps franc
Majerus, Benoît UL

in Le Naour, Jean-Yves (Ed.) Dictionnaire de la Grande Guerre (2008)

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See detailDas 'Corpus der altdeutschen Originalurkunden bis zum Jahr 1300' im Internet. Präsentation - Zugang - Auswertung
Gniffke, Andreas UL

in Vogeler, Georg (Ed.) Digitale Diplomatik. Neue Technologien in der historischen Arbeit mit Urkunden. (2009)

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See detailLe corpus législatif de la ville de Luxembourg reconstitué à travers la pratique administrative et judiciaire
Pauly, Michel UL

in Cauchies, Jean-Marie; Bousmar, Eric (Eds.) Faire bans, edictz et statuz. Légiférer dans la ville médiévale. Sources, objets et acteurs de l'activité législative communale en Occident, ca. 1200-1550. Actes du colloque international tenu à Bruxelles les 17-20 novembre 1999 (2001)

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See detailCorpus of long-term instant messaging based dialogues between advanced learners of German as a foreign language and German native speakers: deL1L2IM
Höhn, Sviatlana UL

Computer development (2015)

The deL1L2IM corpus, created between May and August 2012 and last updated in August 2014, has been collected within the framework of a PhD project on the development of a learning method implying ... [more ▼]

The deL1L2IM corpus, created between May and August 2012 and last updated in August 2014, has been collected within the framework of a PhD project on the development of a learning method implying conversations with an artificial companion. This PhD work is presented as a qualitative investigation of instant messaging dialogues on a long-term basis (four months) between advanced learners of German and German native speakers, chatting about whatever topic they wish. The dataset is composed of 72 dialogues, each of them having a duration of 20 to 45 minutes. The whole corpus contains ca. 52,000 words and 4,800 messages and has a file size of 0.5 Mb. Nine pairs of participants – i.e. nine learners and four native speakers – were required, with 8 dialogues per pair. The interactions have undergone linguistic analysis whereby the annotation will be performed only on repair/correction sequences (incomplete learner error annotation). The goal of the project was to create an application for language modelling and to improve learner language applications, tutoring software and dialogue systems. The corpus is delivered in one written text file (in XML format, customized under TEI P5). [less ▲]

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See detailA corpus-based investigation of language change in Italian: The case of grazie di and grazie per
Viola, Lorella UL

in Journal of Historical Linguistics (2017)

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See detailCorpus-based materials design for EAP listening: the road less travelled
Deroey, Katrien UL

Scientific Conference (2014, June 21)

To assess how representative discourse organisational cues in EAP listening books are, I compared importance marking cues with those I retrieved from the BASE lectures using corpus-based and corpus-driven ... [more ▼]

To assess how representative discourse organisational cues in EAP listening books are, I compared importance marking cues with those I retrieved from the BASE lectures using corpus-based and corpus-driven methods. The corpus investigation revealed a large variety of importance markers, the most common of which (e.g. the point is; remember; anyway; not talk about) differ from those which usually appear in EAP materials. More specifically, the predominant markers in the corpus were multifunctional and less explicit than their far less frequently used prototypical counterparts (e.g. the important point is; you should note; that’s an aside; that’s irrelevant) (cf. Deroey 2013; Deroey & Taverniers 2012a; Deroey & Taverniers 2012b). However, the EAP books I examined vary widely in their inclusion of importance markers and mostly provide fairly prototypical, explicit examples. Most are also not (obviously) based on corpus research. In short, much remains to be done to ensure that corpus evidence informs lecture listening materials so that students are better prepared for the demands of their course lectures. Deroey, K. L. B. (published online 2013). Marking importance in lectures: Interactive and textual orientation. Applied Linguistics. doi: 10.1093/applin/amt029 Deroey, K. L. B., & Taverniers, M. (2012a). ‘Just remember this’: Lexicogrammatical relevance markers in lectures. English for Specific Purposes, 31 (4), 221-233. Deroey, K. L. B., & Taverniers, M. (2012b). ‘Ignore that ‘cause it’s totally irrelevant’: Marking lesser relevance in lectures. Journal of Pragmatics, 44 (14), 2085-2099. [less ▲]

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See detailA corpus-based study of lecture functions
Deroey, Katrien UL; Taverniers, Miriam

in Moderna Språk (2011), 105(2), 122

Despite the importance of lectures in higher education, relatively little is known about lecture discourse. To contribute to our understanding of this genre, this paper presents a comprehensive overview ... [more ▼]

Despite the importance of lectures in higher education, relatively little is known about lecture discourse. To contribute to our understanding of this genre, this paper presents a comprehensive overview of lecture functions, i.e. what lecturers use language for. The functional overview is based on a qualitative analysis of lectures from the British Academic Spoken English Corpus and findings from existing research. Six main functions were identified: informing, elaborating, evaluating, organizing discourse, interacting and managing the class. This functional analysis of the lecture genre should be of interest to both genre analysts in the field of academic discourse and English for Academic Purposes practitioners. [less ▲]

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See detailCorpus-informed EAP course design: a study of lecture functions
Deroey, Katrien UL

Scientific Conference (2009, May)

Increasing student and lecturer mobility along with the spread of English as an academic lingua franca (Mauranen, 2006) means a growing number of non-native speaker lecturers are delivering at least some ... [more ▼]

Increasing student and lecturer mobility along with the spread of English as an academic lingua franca (Mauranen, 2006) means a growing number of non-native speaker lecturers are delivering at least some lectures in English. Well-designed English for Academic Purposes (EAP) courses can be valuable in offering the language input these lecturers are most likely to need for communication within this specific academic context. The creation of corpora containing lectures such as the BASE (British Academic Spoken English) Corpus, MICASE (The Michigan Corpus of Academic Spoken English) and the T2K-SWAL (TOEFL 2000 Spoken and Written Academic Language) Corpus plays an important role in allowing us to adopt a corpus-informed approach to course design and thus tailor courses to lecturers’ specific needs. To date, most corpus-based research on lectures has been based on the American corpora (MICASE and T2K-SWAL) and has had a quantitative bias, investigating the frequency and functions of lexical bundles (e.g. Biber & Barbieri, 2007), discourse markers (e.g. Crawford Camiciottoli, 2004) and evaluative language (e.g. Swales & Burke, 2003). Discourse organisation (e.g. Nesi & Basturkmen, 2006; Thompson, 2003) and the oral-literate characteristics of lectures (e.g. Csomay, 2006) have also been relatively well explored. However, notwithstanding these significant contributions to EAP and the more comprehensive descriptions by Biber (2006) and Crawford Camiciottoli (2007) much remains to be done to obtain a more detailed linguistic picture of lectures. This paper uses data from 12 BASE lectures from various disciplines to provide an overview of attested language functions (e.g. informing, interacting, organising discourse, class management) used in achieving some of the main purposes of lectures (i.e. knowledge transfer, facilitating learning and the socialisation of students into disciplinary communities). Informed by insights from both linguistic and pedagogic research, this functional framework derives from a careful study of whole texts from which larger stretches of speech are assigned to particular functional categories on the basis of lexico-grammatical features, an understanding of the text and generic knowledge (Dudley-Evans, 1994). Biber, D. (2006). University language: a corpus-based study of spoken and written registers. Studies in Corpus Linguistics 23. Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company. Biber, D. & Barbieri, F. (2007). Lexical bundles in university spoken and written registers. English for Specific Purposes, 26, 263-286. Crawford Camiciottoli, B. (2004). Walking on unfamiliar ground: interactive discourse markers in guest lectures. In Partington, A., Morley, J., Haarman, L. (Eds.). (pp. 91-106). Corpora and context. Bern: Peter Lang. Crawford Camiciottoli, B. (2007). The language of business studies lectures. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. Csomay, E. (2006). Academic talk in American university classrooms: crossing the boundaries of oral-literate discourse? Journal of English for Academic Purposes, 5, 117-135. Dudley-Evans, T. (1994). Genre analysis: an approach to text analysis for ESP. In Coulthard, M. (Ed.). Advances in written text analysis. (pp. 219-228). London: Routledge. Mauranen, A. (2006). Spoken discourse, academics and global English: a corpus perspective. In Hughes, R. (Ed.). Spoken English, TESOL and applied linguistics. (pp. 143-158). Basingstoke: Palgrave MacMillan. Nesi, H. & Basturkmen, H. (2006). Lexical bundles and discourse signalling in academic lectures. International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, 11 (3), 283-304. Swales, J. M. & Burke A. (2003). “It’s really fascinating work”: differences in evaluative adjectives across academic registers. In Leistyna P. & Meyer, C. F. (Eds.). Language and comparisons: Studies in Practical Linguistics, 46. (pp. 1-18). Amsterdam: Rodopi. Thompson, S. E. (2003). Text-structuring metadiscourse, intonation and the signalling of organisation in academic lectures. Journal of English for Academic Purposes, 2, 5-20. [less ▲]

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See detailCorpus-informed EAP syllabus design: a study of lecture functions
Deroey, Katrien UL

Scientific Conference (2008, November 22)

Increasing student and lecturer mobility along with the spread of English as an academic lingua franca (Mauranen, 2006) means a growing number of university lecturers in Europe are delivering at least ... [more ▼]

Increasing student and lecturer mobility along with the spread of English as an academic lingua franca (Mauranen, 2006) means a growing number of university lecturers in Europe are delivering at least some lectures in English. Well-designed English for Academic Purposes (EAP) courses can help lecturers whose first language is not English in meeting this challenge and findings from corpus linguistic research on authentic lectures are invaluable in informing decisions about the development of such courses. However, a comprehensive corpus-based account of language use in English language lectures does not exist, although recent publications by Biber (2006) and Crawford Camiciottoli (2007) constitute significant contributions to such a description. This paper aims to add to our understanding of what language is used for in lectures by providing an overview of language functions (e.g. interacting, evaluating, organizing discourse, class management) as related to the reported purposes of lectures (e.g. knowledge transfer and the socialization of students into disciplinary communities). This functional framework is based on a manual inspection of British lectures using qualitative methods, with larger stretches of speech being assigned to particular functional categories on the basis of lexico-grammatical features, an understanding of the text and generic knowledge (Dudley-Evans, 1994). Biber, D. (2006). University language: a corpus-based study of spoken and written registers. Studies in Corpus Linguistics 23. Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company. Crawford Camiciottoli, B. (2007). The language of business studies lectures. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. Dudley-Evans, T. (1994). Genre analysis: an approach to text analysis for ESP. In Coulthard, M. (ed.). Advances in written text analysis. (pp. 219-228). London: Routledge. Mauranen, A. (2006). Spoken discourse, academics and global English: a corpus perspective. In Hughes, R. (Ed.). Spoken English, TESOL and applied linguistics. (pp. 143-158). Basingstoke: Palgrave MacMillan. [less ▲]

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See detailCorrect biological timing in Arabidopsis requires multiple light-signaling pathways.
Dalchau, N.; Hubbard, K. E.; Robertson, F. C. et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2010), 107(29), 13171-13176

Circadian oscillators provide rhythmic temporal cues for a range of biological processes in plants and animals, enabling anticipation of the day/night cycle and enhancing fitness-associated traits. We ... [more ▼]

Circadian oscillators provide rhythmic temporal cues for a range of biological processes in plants and animals, enabling anticipation of the day/night cycle and enhancing fitness-associated traits. We have used engineering models to understand the control principles of a plant's response to seasonal variation. We show that the seasonal changes in the timing of circadian outputs require light regulation via feed-forward loops, combining rapid light-signaling pathways with entrained circadian oscillators. Linear time-invariant models of circadian rhythms were computed for 3,503 circadian-regulated genes and for the concentration of cytosolic-free calcium to quantify the magnitude and timing of regulation by circadian oscillators and light-signaling pathways. Bioinformatic and experimental analysis show that rapid light-induced regulation of circadian outputs is associated with seasonal rephasing of the output rhythm. We identify that external coincidence is required for rephasing of multiple output rhythms, and is therefore important in general phase control in addition to specific photoperiod-dependent processes such as flowering and hypocotyl elongation. Our findings uncover a fundamental design principle of circadian regulation, and identify the importance of rapid light-signaling pathways in temporal control. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 85 (2 UL)