Browsing
     by title


0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

or enter first few letters:   
OK
Full Text
See detailWhat can Evaluative Learning tell us about Implicit Learning?
Reuter, Robert UL; Cleeremans, Axel

Poster (2000, September)

Detailed reference viewed: 78 (2 UL)
Full Text
See detailWhat can schools, teachers and learners learn from implicit learning research?
Reuter, Robert UL

Scientific Conference (2014, May 27)

Implicit learning research has shown us that we learn all the time, that we learn even when we have no intention to learn, no awareness of the fact that we are learning or no awareness of what we are ... [more ▼]

Implicit learning research has shown us that we learn all the time, that we learn even when we have no intention to learn, no awareness of the fact that we are learning or no awareness of what we are learning (Reber, 1967; Cleeremans, Destrebecqz, & Boyer, 1998; Reuter, 2013). However in schools and in school-oriented formal learning settings, we are supposed to build up a different type of knowledge that we can explicitly (most often verbally) remember and apply to new situations (Bloom, 1956). This distinction between implicit and explicit knowledge may however not be so clear-cut, for theoretical, methodological and empirical reasons, and, more importantly, it may not be very useful when applying basic cognitive science to educational practices. On the contrary, we want to invite teachers (and learners) to rather think of learning as a set of complex processes, where so-called implicit and explicit learning processes, more often than not, interactively work together to construct personal knowledge in our brains. Therefore we recommend using teaching strategies that foster both types of knowledge bases, so that explicit learning can efficiently build upon the results of implicit learning processes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 67 (5 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailWhat can we learn from patients with heart failure about exercise adherence? A systematic review of qualitative papers.
Tierney, Stephanie; Mamas, Mamas; Skelton, Dawn et al

in Health Psychology (2011), 30(4), 401-10

OBJECTIVES: Keeping physically active has been shown to bring positive outcomes for patients diagnosed with heart failure (HF). However, a number of individuals with this health problem do not undertake ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: Keeping physically active has been shown to bring positive outcomes for patients diagnosed with heart failure (HF). However, a number of individuals with this health problem do not undertake regular exercise. A review of extant qualitative research was conducted to explore what it can tell us about barriers and enablers to physical activity among people with HF. METHODS: A systematic search, involving electronic databases and endeavors to locate gray literature, was carried out to identify relevant qualitative studies published from 1980 onward. Data from retrieved papers were combined using framework analysis. Papers read in full numbered 32, and 20 were included in the review. RESULTS: Synthesis of results from the 20 studies resulted in 4 main themes: Changing soma, negative emotional response, adjusting to altered status, and interpersonal influences. How individuals responded to their diagnosis and their altered physical status related to their activity levels, as did the degree of encouragement to exercise coming from family, friends, and professionals. These findings can be connected to the theory of behavioral change developed by Bandura, known as social cognitive theory (SCT). CONCLUSIONS: SCT may be a useful framework for developing interventions to support patients with HF in undertaking and maintaining regular exercise patterns. Specific components of SCT that practitioners may wish to consider include self-efficacy and outcome expectancies. These were issues referred to in papers for the systematic review that appear to be particularly related to exercise adherence. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 145 (1 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailWhat Constitutes Aging Workforce Management? Lessons Learned in an Industry-Specific Case Study
Streb, Christoph Klaus UL; Voelpel, S; Leibold, M et al

in Bornemeyer, C; Schneider, J (Eds.) Aging Society and its Implications for Services Marketing – Approaches in Hospitality, Tourism and Transport (2011)

Detailed reference viewed: 54 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailWhat cultural psychologies need: Generalizing theories
Valsiner, Jaan UL

in Culture and Psychology (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 103 (1 UL)
Full Text
See detailWhat Dignity Demands: From Political to Poetical Liberalism
Mailey, Richard Samuel David UL

Doctoral thesis (2017)

The thesis attempts to measure the disjoint between the promise of human dignity that appears at the heart of Western law (e.g. in national constitutions and international human rights instruments), and ... [more ▼]

The thesis attempts to measure the disjoint between the promise of human dignity that appears at the heart of Western law (e.g. in national constitutions and international human rights instruments), and the experiences of exclusion and frustration that, in 2017, have seen many Westerners turn to anti-liberal, populist demagogues for relief. In measuring this disjoint, the thesis looks to the work of liberal and anti-liberal theorists alike, including John Rawls, Bruce Ackerman, Carl Schmitt and Jacques Derrida. It then uses the insights gained to construct a liberal theory that can overcome the key problems identified, before using this theory to critically engage with the constitutional jurisprudence of three very different states: Canada, South Africa and the United States. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 198 (17 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailWhat do alexithymia items measure? A discriminant content validity study of the Toronto-alexithymia-scale–20
Veirman, Elke; van Ryckeghem, Dimitri UL; Verleysen, Gregory et al

in PeerJ (2021), 29

Background Questions have been raised about whether items of alexithymia scales assess the construct alexithymia and its key features, and no other related constructs. This study assessed the ... [more ▼]

Background Questions have been raised about whether items of alexithymia scales assess the construct alexithymia and its key features, and no other related constructs. This study assessed the (discriminant) content validity of the most widely used alexithymia scale, i.e., the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20). Methods Participants (n = 81) rated to what extent TAS-20 items and items of related constructs were relevant for assessing the constructs ‘alexithymia’, ‘difficulty identifying feelings’, ‘difficulty describing feelings’, ‘externally-oriented thinking’, ‘limited imaginal capacity’, ‘anxiety’, ‘depression’, and ‘health anxiety’. Results Results revealed that, overall, the TAS-20 did only partly measure ‘alexithymia’. Only the subscales ‘difficulty identifying feelings’ and ‘difficulty describing feelings’ represented ‘alexithymia’ and their intended construct, although some content overlap between these subscales was found. In addition, some items assessed (health) anxiety equally well or even better. Conclusions Revision of the TAS-20 is recommended to adequately assess all key features of alexithymia. Findings with the TAS-20 need to be interpreted with caution in people suffering from medical conditions. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 26 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailWhat do students say about the role of the minus sign in polynominals?
Vlassis, Joëlle UL

in Proceedings of the 33rd Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (2009)

Detailed reference viewed: 77 (4 UL)
See detailWhat do teachers think about their students' inclusion? Consistency of self- and teacher reports
Venetz; Zurbriggen, Carmen UL; Schwab, Susanne

Scientific Conference (2017, September)

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailWhat do teachers think about their students’ inclusion? Consistency of students’ self-reports and teacher ratings
Venetz, Martin; Zurbriggen, Carmen UL; Schwab, Susanne

in Frontiers in Psychology (2019), 10(1637), 114

Detailed reference viewed: 49 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailWhat Do They Want from a Career? University Students’ Future Career Expectations and Resources in a Health Crisis Context
Pignault, Anne; Vayre, Emilie; Houssemand, Claude UL

in Sustainability (2022), 14(24),

Young people and students, in particular, have often been presented as being particularly affected by the health crisis and its various psychological, social, and economic consequences. In this context ... [more ▼]

Young people and students, in particular, have often been presented as being particularly affected by the health crisis and its various psychological, social, and economic consequences. In this context, the present study sought to better understand the links between the anxiety generated by this crisis regarding one’s professional future, the resources available, and future career expectations. A total of 585 higher education students participated in the study during the third lockdown in France and completed a questionnaire that focused on anxiety and apprehension about the future, psychological and adaptative resources, and preferences for dimensions of new careers (kaleidoscopic, sustainable, protean, boundaryless, and opportunistic). The results show, on the one hand, significant links between anxiety, optimism, hope, career adaptability and preferences expressed for dimensions of new careers; on the other hand, dimensions that are more preferred than others. Finally, these results will be discussed in relation to the correlations already highlighted in the literature between individuals and career expectations, and to the more global reflection on the future of work. Possible avenues in the field of career counselling will be proposed. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 40 (0 UL)
Full Text
See detailWhat do we accept after an announcement?
de Boer, Mathijs UL; Herzig, Andreas; de Lima, Tiago et al

Scientific Conference (2008)

Detailed reference viewed: 49 (2 UL)
See detailWhat Do We Know About Audit Oversight
Muessig, Anke UL

in Dutzi, Andreas; Gros, Marius; Nowak, Karsten (Eds.) et al Corporate Governance, Rechenschaft und Abschlussprüfung: Festschrift für Hans-Joachim Böcking zum 65. Geburtstag (2021)

Detailed reference viewed: 118 (3 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailWhat Do We Know About Managing Aging Teams? Lessons Learned from the Automotive Shop Floor
Streb, Christoph Klaus UL; Gellert, F.J.

in Organizational Dynamics (2011), 40(2), 144-150

Detailed reference viewed: 102 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailWhat Do We Learn from Spheroid Culture Systems? Insights from Tumorspheres Derived from Primary Colon Cancer Tissue.
Baig, Komal UL; Ullmann, Pit UL; Rodriguez, Fabien UL et al

in PLoS ONE (2016), 11

Due to their self-renewal and tumorigenic properties, tumor-initiating cells (TICs) have been hypothesized to be important targets for colorectal cancer (CRC). However the study of TICs is hampered by the ... [more ▼]

Due to their self-renewal and tumorigenic properties, tumor-initiating cells (TICs) have been hypothesized to be important targets for colorectal cancer (CRC). However the study of TICs is hampered by the fact that the identification and culturing of TICs is still a subject of extensive debate. Floating three-dimensional spheroid cultures (SC) that grow in serum-free medium supplemented with growth factors are supposed to be enriched in TICs. We generated SC from fresh clinical tumor specimens and compared them to SC isolated from CRC cell-lines as well as to adherent differentiated counterparts. Patient-derived SC display self-renewal capacity and can induce serial transplantable tumors in immuno-deficient mice, which phenotypically resemble the tumor of origin. In addition, the original tumor tissue and established SC retain several similar CRC-relevant mutations. Primary SC express key stemness proteins such as SOX2, OCT4, NANOG and LGR5 and importantly show increased chemoresistance ability compared to their adherent differentiated counterparts and to cell line-derived SC. Strikingly, cells derived from spheroid or adherent differentiating culture conditions displayed similar self-renewal capacity and equally formed tumors in immune-deficient mice, suggesting that self-renewal and tumor-initiation capacity of TICs is not restricted to phenotypically immature spheroid cells, which we describe to be highly plastic and able to reacquire stem-cell traits even after long differentiation processes. Finally, we identified two genes among a sphere gene expression signature that predict disease relapse in CRC patients. Here we propose that SC derived from fresh patient tumor tissue present interesting phenotypic features that may have clinical relevance for chemoresistance and disease relapse and therefore represent a valuable tool to test for new CRC-therapies that overcome drug resistance. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 229 (34 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailWhat do we need to say about a design method?
Gericke, Kilian UL; Eckert, Claudia; Stacey, Martin

in Proceedings of the 21st International Conference on Engineering Design (2017, August)

Method development is one of the raisons d’etre of engineering design research and method uptake by industry is perceived as an important success criterion. This paper argues that one of the problems with ... [more ▼]

Method development is one of the raisons d’etre of engineering design research and method uptake by industry is perceived as an important success criterion. This paper argues that one of the problems with methods is the lack of clarity about what is actually proposed to industry and the academic community when a new method is put forward, in terms of how detailed, strict, precise and rigorous the method is and what it can deliver. This paper puts the concept of method in the context of related concepts and proposes a multi-level model of the elements of a method to argue that a contribution on each of these levels can be of value and that the introduction of methods can fail on each of these levels. Implications thereof for industry and academia are discussed, concluding that a clear description of methods and their intended use is important for enabling proper validation of each of the method’s elements and for communicating methods to academia and industry. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 129 (6 UL)