Browsing
     by title


0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

or enter first few letters:   
OK
See detail„What’s a normal weight?“ – Weight assessment standards in Origin- and Receiving Country and Immigrant Adolescents’ Weight-Status Self-Assessment
Kern, Matthias Robert UL; Heinz, Andreas UL; Stevens, Gonneke et al

Scientific Conference (2019, June 19)

Background: Many young people struggle with correctly assessing their weight-status, often leaving over- or underweight to go unnoticed thereby preventing adequate intervention. The prevalence of weight ... [more ▼]

Background: Many young people struggle with correctly assessing their weight-status, often leaving over- or underweight to go unnoticed thereby preventing adequate intervention. The prevalence of weight-status misperception differs considerably cross-nationally, indicating that individual weight-status assessment is informed by culturally transmitted standards of evaluation. For adolescents with a migration background, this brings up the problem of multiple frames of reference, as their perception of weight-status may be influenced by different cultural standards. Objective: We investigate the extent to which the assessment of one's own weight-status is based on standards of the heritage country or the receiving country. Methods: Data are retrieved from the 2014 Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children study. The cross-national design of the study enabled us to aggregate weight-evaluation standards for 41 countries and subsequently identify a large sample of 8132 immigrant adolescents in 23 receiving countries from 41 heritage countries. The influence of heritage- and receiving country standards of evaluation was assessed using cross-classified multilevel models. Results: Descriptive analyses reveal considerable differences in weight-evaluation standards between the countries. We find evidence of a significant influence of both heritage- and receiving culture standards of evaluation, with a stronger impact of receiving culture standards. Stratified analyses reveal a stronger influence of heritage culture standards among first- than among second-generation immigrants, and a stronger influence of receiving culture standards among second- than among first-generation immigrants. Conclusions: The results corroborate our expectations regarding the persistency of cultural standards and help to understand inter-ethnic differences in weight-status assessment. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 125 (14 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detail“What's a normal weight?” – Origin and receiving country influences on weight-status assessment among 1.5 and 2nd generation immigrant adolescents in Europe
Kern, Matthias Robert UL; Heinz, Andreas UL; Stevens, Gonneke W.J.M. et al

in Social Science and Medicine (2020)

Many adolescents struggle with adequately assessing their weight-status, often leading to unnecessary weight-related interventions or preventing necessary ones. The prevalence of weight-status over- and ... [more ▼]

Many adolescents struggle with adequately assessing their weight-status, often leading to unnecessary weight-related interventions or preventing necessary ones. The prevalence of weight-status over- and underestimation differs considerably cross-nationally, suggesting that individual weight-status assessment is informed by cross-nationally differing standards of evaluation. For adolescents with a migration background, this brings up the possibility of a simultaneous influence of origin- and receiving country standards. The current study examines the magnitude of both influences using data from the 2014 Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children study. The cross-national design of the study enabled us to aggregate weight-evaluation standards for 41, primarily European, countries. Subsequently, we identified a sample of 8 124 adolescents with a migration background whose origin as well as receiving country participated in the study. Among those adolescents, we assessed the effects of origin and receiving country weight-evaluation standards using cross-classified multilevel regression analyses. Descriptive analyses revealed considerable differences in weight-evaluation standards between the countries. Regression analyses showed that both origin- and receiving country weight-evaluation standards were significantly associated cross-sectionally with weight-status assessment among the immigrant adolescents, with a stronger impact of receiving country standards. Results illustrate the context-sensitivity of adolescent weight-status assessment and reinforce the theoretical notion that immigrant adolescent development is not only informed by factors pertaining to their receiving country but also, albeit to a lesser extent, by those pertaining to their origin country. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 157 (24 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailWhat's Around the Corner? Enhancing Driver Awareness in Autonomous Vehicles via In-Vehicle Spatial Auditory Displays
Beattie, David; Baillie, Lynne; Halvey, Martin et al

in Proceedings of NordiCHI '14, October 26 - 30 2014, Helsinki, Finland (2014, October 26)

There is currently a distinct lack of design consideration associated with autonomous vehicles and their impact on human factors. Research has yet to consider fully the impact felt by the driver when he ... [more ▼]

There is currently a distinct lack of design consideration associated with autonomous vehicles and their impact on human factors. Research has yet to consider fully the impact felt by the driver when he/she is no longer in control of the vehicle [12]. We propose that spatialised auditory feedback could be used to enhance driver awareness to the intended actions of autonomous vehicles. We hypothesise that this feedback will provide drivers with an enhanced sense of control. This paper presents a driving simulator study where 5 separate auditory feedback methods are compared during both autonomous and manual driving scenarios. We found that our spatialised auditory presentation method alerted drivers to the intended actions of autonomous vehicles much more than all other methodsand they felt significantly more in control during scenarios containing sound vs. no sound. Finally, that overall workload in autonomous vehicle scenarios was lower compared to manual vehicle scenarios. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 194 (9 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailWhat's in a Cyber Threat Intelligence sharing platform?: A mixed-methods user experience investigation of MISP
Stojkovski, Borce UL; Lenzini, Gabriele UL; Koenig, Vincent UL et al

in Annual Computer Security Applications Conference (ACSAC ’21) (2021, December)

The ever-increasing scale and complexity of cyber attacks and cyber-criminal activities necessitate secure and effective sharing of cyber threat intelligence (CTI) among a diverse set of stakeholders and ... [more ▼]

The ever-increasing scale and complexity of cyber attacks and cyber-criminal activities necessitate secure and effective sharing of cyber threat intelligence (CTI) among a diverse set of stakeholders and communities. CTI sharing platforms are becoming indispensable tools for cooperative and collaborative cybersecurity. Nevertheless, despite the growing research in this area, the emphasis is often placed on the technical aspects, incentives, or implications associated with CTI sharing, as opposed to investigating challenges encountered by users of such platforms. To date, user experience (UX) aspects remain largely unexplored. This paper offers a unique contribution towards understanding the constraining and enabling factors of security information sharing within one of the leading platforms. MISP is an open source CTI sharing platform used by more than 6,000 organizations worldwide. As a technically-advanced CTI sharing platform it aims to cater for a diverse set of security information workers with distinct needs and objectives. In this respect, MISP has to pay an equal amount of attention to the UX in order to maximize and optimize the quantity and quality of threat information that is contributed and consumed. Using mixed methods we shed light on the strengths and weaknesses of MISP from an end-users’ perspective and discuss the role UX could play in effective CTI sharing. We conclude with an outline of future work and open challenges worth further exploring in this nascent, yet highly important socio-technical context. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 252 (9 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailWhat’s in a Name: Gamifying the Intangible History of Larochette, Luxembourg
Morse, Christopher UL; de Kramer, Marleen UL

in Börner, Wolfgang; Uhlirz, Susanne (Eds.) Proceedings of the 23rd International Conference on Cultural Heritage and New Technologies 2018. CHNT 23, 2018 (Vienna 2019) (2019)

The Larochette app is part of a larger interdisciplinary project to create a digital reconstruction of the town and castle of Larochette, Luxembourg. The paper discusses the creation of an app that serves ... [more ▼]

The Larochette app is part of a larger interdisciplinary project to create a digital reconstruction of the town and castle of Larochette, Luxembourg. The paper discusses the creation of an app that serves to pique interest in linguistics and historical geography, traditionally dry subjects with little intrinsic appeal to children and the general public. This project harnesses this effect, presenting the results of the preceding landscape study in an interactive educational environment that rewards the user for engaging with the content. As the app allows natural movement and intuitive interaction, exploration and learning are prompted by curiosity. The goal of connecting place names to heritage is not explicitly stated, nor is it presented as an educational game. In short, this is the second phase of a collaborative case study in the digital experience of history, which is grounded in user experience design and informed by the historical and architectural expertise of the collaborators. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 78 (6 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailWhat’s in a name? Identity, indexicality and name-change in an immigrant context
Obojska, Maria UL

in European Journal of Applied Linguistics (2020), 8(2), 333-353

The present study explores the case of a transnational Polish family in Norway in which one of the care givers as well as the teenage son underwent a name change after their initial experiences of ... [more ▼]

The present study explores the case of a transnational Polish family in Norway in which one of the care givers as well as the teenage son underwent a name change after their initial experiences of migration. Drawing on the audio-recorded interactions in the interview situation, the article investigates the identity constructions of the focal participant in his narrative about the name change. To this end, first, the indexicalities of the social identity category Pole as constructed in Norwegian media and the participants’ accounts are outlined. Then, against this backdrop, the focal participant’s identity claims as occasioned in the narrative on the name change are discursively analyzed. The analysis shows that the identity claims the focal participant makes aim at dissociating himself from the powerless, stigmatized position of a migrant, in which he was cast upon his arrival in Norway. Furthermore, the study suggests that migrant identity constructions need to be considered against the participants’ lived experiences of migration, larger societal discourses and against participants’ constructions of belonging to imagined communities. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 108 (8 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailWhat's in an Icon? Promises and Pitfalls of Data Protection Iconography
Rossi, Arianna UL; Palmirani, Monica

in Leenes, Ronald; Hallinan, Dara; Gutwirth, Serge (Eds.) et al Data Protection and Privacy: Data Protection and Democracy (2020)

Under the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), transparency of information becomes an obligation aimed at creating an ecosystem where data subjects understand and control what happens to their ... [more ▼]

Under the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), transparency of information becomes an obligation aimed at creating an ecosystem where data subjects understand and control what happens to their personal data. The definition of transparency stresses its user-centric nature, while design considerations to comply with this obligation assume central importance. This article focuses on the icons established by the GDPR Art. 12.7 to offer “a meaningful overview of the intended processing”. Existing attempts to represent data protection through icons have not met widespread adoption and reasons about the strengths and weaknesses of their creation and evaluation are here discussed. Building on this analysis, we present an empirical research proposing a new icon set that responds to GDPR requirements. The article also discusses the challenges of creating and evaluating such icon set and provides some future directions of research for effective an effective implementation and standardization. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 343 (22 UL)
See detailWhat’s Next?
Hedinger, Johannes; Meyer, Torsten; Miessen, Markus UL

Book published by Kulturverlag Kadmos (2013)

Die Welt ist im Wandel und mit ihr die Kunst. Was ist die nächste Kunst? Welche Themen werden künftig wichtig? Welche Formen, Methoden, Verfahrensweisen und Praktiken setzen sich durch? Wie bildet sich ... [more ▼]

Die Welt ist im Wandel und mit ihr die Kunst. Was ist die nächste Kunst? Welche Themen werden künftig wichtig? Welche Formen, Methoden, Verfahrensweisen und Praktiken setzen sich durch? Wie bildet sich Zukunft in den Künsten, im Design, den neuen Medien und der Creative Industries? Und welchen Einfluss haben dabei Krisen? Der Reader diskutiert in Theorie und Praxis und auf breiter Phänomen- und Literaturgrundlage Möglichkeiten der Kunst der nächsten Gesellschaft, den sich ankündigenden Paradigmenwechsel, die neusten Entwicklungen des System ›Kunst‹ sowie die gewandelten Bedingungen von Produktion, Distribution und Rezeption von Kunst heute in einem globalen Kontext. Versammelt sind 177 Essays und Interviews sowie über 150 Thesen, Manifeste und Zitate von insgesamt 304 Autoren zum Thema des möglichen Nächsten. Sie entstammen einer Zeitspanne von etwa 3000 Jahren, wobei die Mehrheit der Beiträge aus den letzten drei Jahren datiert ist. Darunter finden sich so unterschiedliche Denkanstöße von Dirk Baecker, Hans Belting, Luc Boltanski, Nicolas Bourriaud, Bazon Brock, Judith Butler, Ève Chiapello, Carolyn Christov-Barkargiev, Chris Dercon, Diedrich Diederichsen, Hal Foster, Andrea Fraser, David Graeber, Isabelle Graw, Boris Groys, Jörg Heiser, Thomas Hirschhorn, Naomi Klein, Maurizio Lazaratto, Ben Lewis, Chus Martinez, Jonathan Meese, Markus Miessen, Carmen Mörsch, Hans Ulrich Obrist, Jacques Rancière, Milo Rau, Gerald Raunig, Andreas Reckwitz, Irit Rogoff, Jerry Saltz, Tomáš Sedlácek, Tino Sehgal, Peter Sloterdijk, Hito Steyerl, The Yes Men, Wolfgang Ullrich, Jan Verwoert, Anton Vidokle, Peter Weibel, Beat Wyss, Slavoj Žižek oder Artur Zmijewski und vielen anderen. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (0 UL)
See detailWhat’s Next?
Meyer, Torsten; Kolb, Gila; Miessen, Markus UL

Book published by Kopaed (2015)

Die Welt ist im Wandel und mit ihr die Kunst. Was ist die nächste Kunst? Welche Themen werden künftig wichtig? Welche Formen, Methoden, Verfahrensweisen und Praktiken setzen sich durch? Welche Folgen hat ... [more ▼]

Die Welt ist im Wandel und mit ihr die Kunst. Was ist die nächste Kunst? Welche Themen werden künftig wichtig? Welche Formen, Methoden, Verfahrensweisen und Praktiken setzen sich durch? Welche Folgen hat das für das Denken über Bildung und Vermittlung der "nächsten Kunst"?Band 2 der Reihe "What's Next?" ist ein Reader. Er versammelt Essays, Interviews, Thesen, Manifeste und Zitate, die im Anschluss an den ersten Band "What´s Next ? Kunst nach der Krise" (herausgegeben von Johannes M. Hedinger und Torsten Meyer, Berlin 2013) Möglichkeiten der Verkoppelung von Kunst und Bildung - in der Schule, im Museum und an anderen Orten - thematisiert. Die Beiträge nehmen zum Teil Bezug auf Texte aus dem ersten Band, auf das Buch im Ganzen oder auf parallele Entwicklungen und Beobachtungen. Wie bereits im ersten Band wurden die Beiträge mit Blick auf den internationalen Diskurs und globalen Kontext zusammengestellt. Es gibt deshalb Beiträge in deutscher als auch in englischer Sprache.Das Buch soll Kunstlehrer_innen, Kunstvermittler_innen und Studierende anregen, die Verknüpfung von Kunst und Pädagogik vor dem Hintergrund der nächsten Kunst neu zu (be)denken. Es unterbreitet auch konkrete Vorschläge für Praxis, die helfen zu imaginieren, was Kunstpädagogik im fortgeschrittenen 21. Jahrhundert bedeuten könnte.Versammelt sind rund 120 Essays und Interviews sowie über 100 Thesen, Manifeste und Zitate von insgesamt weit über 200 Autor_innen zum Thema des möglichen Nächsten im Feld der Kunstpädagogik.Darunter finden sich unterschiedliche Denkanstöße von Marina Abramovic, Maria Acaso, Paolo Bianchi, Franz Billmayer, Nicolas Bourriaud, Bündnis kritischer Kulturpraktikerinnen, Sara Burkhardt, Jacques Derrida, Mary Drinkwater, James Elkins, Sabine Gebhardt-Fink, Lady Gaga, Neil Gaiman, Priska Gisler, Jean-Pierre Grüter, Talita Groenendijk, Jan Grünwald, Robert Hausmann, Johannes Hedinger, Christine Heil, Antonia Hensmann, Emiel Heijnen, Alexander Henschel, Gerrit Höfferer, Marike Hoekstra, Selma Holo, Christina Inthoff, Henry Jenkins, Peter Jenny, Konrad Jentzsch, Benjamin Jörissen, Notburga Karl, Lennart Krauß, Gesa Krebber, Marie-Luise Lange, Heinrich Lüber, Nanna Lüth, Oliver Marchart, Paul Mecheril, Markus Miessen, Carmen Mörsch, Chantal Mouffe, Karl-Josef Pazzini, Peter Piller, Stephan Porombka, Jacques Rancière, Irit Rogoff, Lisa Rosa, Andrea Sabisch, Ansgar Schnurr, Diederik Schoenau, Ulrich Schötker, Konstanze Schütze, Bernadett Settele, Michel Serres, Stefan Seydel, Keri Smith, Cornelia Sollfrank, Marcus Steinweg, Nora Sternfeld, Sabine Sutter, Adam Szymczyk, Sally Tallant, Kevin Tavin, Kristin Westphal, Georg Winter, Manuel Zahn, Jutta Zaremba, Rahel Ziethen und vielen anderen. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 17 (0 UL)
Full Text
See detailWHAT’S PSYCHOLOGY GOT TO DO WITH IT: LABOUR MARKET INCLUSION OF PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES
Limbach-Reich, Arthur UL

Presentation (2020, April)

The present contribution seeks to advance psychological approaches in inclusion of persons with a disability or health condition in decent work. People with disabilities and mental ill health appear to be ... [more ▼]

The present contribution seeks to advance psychological approaches in inclusion of persons with a disability or health condition in decent work. People with disabilities and mental ill health appear to be among the most neglected groups when it comes to integration into the labour market (ILO, 2018; WHO, 2011). Article 27 of the CRPD emphasises equal access to the labour market as a governmental obligation and obliges signatory states to take appropriate measures (CRPD, 2006). However, specific programmes and measures to promote the employment of people with disabilities based on a human image of "protean career attitude" (Fugate, Kinicki, & Ashforth, 2004) often achieve only moderate success despite the involvement of psychological services, as shown by the example of national concepts in Luxembourg (Limbach-Reich, 2019). Searching for reasons one can identify two main strands which, on the one hand, concern the perspective of people with disabilities in sheltered workshops with regard to the general labour market and, on the other hand, appear in the employers' insufficient recruitment practice (WHO, 2011). As the present study shows, for the majority of people in sheltered workshops this form of employment is the more attractive alternative under the given circumstances. Inclusion in the first labour market is only sought by a minority. The reasons given for the preference for a protected employment status are overstrain and negative experiences on the first labour market. At the same time, in an increasingly neo-liberal employment market, the willingness to employ people with disabilities seems to be only slightly pronounced. The majority of the population of disabled workers in a workshop are not considered attractive for the existing labour market, as they do not correspond to the propagated image of the individual oriented towards career advancement, entrepreneurship aspiration and self-optimisation (Seithe, 2013). In conclusion, it is demanded that psychology should review prevailing neoliberal assumptions about the human behaviour and become more politically involved. In particular, psychology has to ask itself whether, by pursuing inclusion in the labour market exclusively, it fails and contributes to blaming the victims, especially those with mental and psychological disabilities. If in the future there are fewer and fewer people available for paid work and unconditional basic income will rise (Harari, 2015; Kela, 2019), then psychology, in cooperation with other disciplines, must also face up to the challenges and develop approaches that make psychological well-being and self-actualisation possible beyond the overarching neoliberal employment rigor. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 143 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailWhat’s the point of lifelong learning if lifelong learning has no point? On the democratic deficit of policies for lifelong learning.
Biesta, Gert UL

in European Educational Research Journal (2006), 5(3-4), 169-180

Detailed reference viewed: 201 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailWHATS IN A GENOME
BORK, P.; OUZOUNIS, C.; SANDER, C. et al

in Nature (1992), 358(6384), 287-287

Detailed reference viewed: 153 (2 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailWhat´s in a diagnosis: The Effect of Externalizing and Internalizing Students´ Behaviour on Pre-service Teachers' Classroom Management and Interaction Strategies
Glock, Sabine UL; Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL

in British Journal of Educational Psychology (2021), 91(4), 1185-1201

Background. All over the word, classrooms are getting more and more diverse and teachers are required to effectively manage these classes even when students have special education needs (SEN). Aims. The ... [more ▼]

Background. All over the word, classrooms are getting more and more diverse and teachers are required to effectively manage these classes even when students have special education needs (SEN). Aims. The study aimed to investigate classroom management strategies and interpersonal teacher behaviour in relation to students internalizing and externalizing behaviour, whereby we varied the diagnosis of special educational needs. Sample. Two hundred and fifty-four German pre-service teachers (143 female) with a mean age of 26.04 years participated in the study. Method. Using an experimental between-subjects design, a fictitious student was described as exhibiting either internalizing or externalizing behaviour. Additionally, we varied whether the student was diagnosed as having SEN or not. The participants were asked to indicate which strategies they would apply and how they would interact with students. Results. Results showed that teacher interaction in response to both students with internalizing and externalizing behaviour approached ideal interpersonal teacher behaviour (i.e. high level of cooperativeness with certain level of dominance), whereas pre-service teachers applied all classroom management strategies to minimize effects of student behaviour on learning time. Although pre-service teachers adapted their responses based on type of behaviour, they only made allowances for internalizing behaviour while their response to externalizing behaviour did not vary much as a function of a SEN diagnosis. Conclusions. Together, these findings highlight the importance of providing preservice teachers with the pedagogical knowledge concerning effective classroom management and flexible use of strategies in response to diverse student needs in inclusive classrooms. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 57 (2 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailWheeled Pro(p)file of Batalin-Vilkovisky formalism
Merkulov, Sergei UL

in Communications in Mathematical Physics (2010), 295(3), 585638

Detailed reference viewed: 129 (2 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailWheeled props in algebra, geometry and quantization.
Merkulov, Sergei UL

in Proceedings (2010)

Detailed reference viewed: 178 (4 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailWheeled PROPs, graph complexes and the master equation
Markl, Martin; Merkulov, Sergei UL; Shadrin, Sergei

in Journal of Pure and Applied Algebra (2009), 213(4), 496-535

We introduce and study wheeled PROPs, an extension of the theory of PROPs which can treat traces and, in particular, solutions to the master equations which involve divergence operators. We construct a dg ... [more ▼]

We introduce and study wheeled PROPs, an extension of the theory of PROPs which can treat traces and, in particular, solutions to the master equations which involve divergence operators. We construct a dg free wheeled PROP whose representations are in one-to-one correspondence with formal germs of SP-manifolds, key geometric objects in the theory of Batalin–Vilkovisky quantization. We also construct minimal wheeled resolutions of classical operads Com and Ass as non-trivial extensions of the well-known dg operads Com-infinityand Ass-infinity source. Finally, we apply the above results to a computation of cohomology of a directed version of Kontsevich’s complex of ribbon graphs. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 133 (4 UL)
See detailWhen a Kippah Represents All Jews: Navigating Shifting Signs from Talmud Torah to School in Luxembourg
Badder, Anastasia UL

Scientific Conference (2021, December 20)

Across the contexts of the lives of Luxembourg's Liberal Talmud Torah students, secularism and mobility are highly valued and understood to be key characteristics of modern living. Talmud Torah students ... [more ▼]

Across the contexts of the lives of Luxembourg's Liberal Talmud Torah students, secularism and mobility are highly valued and understood to be key characteristics of modern living. Talmud Torah students feel they easily meet these criteria – they are multilingual, they currently lead and anticipate highly mobile lives, they see themselves as cosmopolitan and their approach to Jewish life as flexible, and, equally importantly, they look, dress, and comport themselves "like everyone else", all of which are understood to facilitate movement (in the sense of movement across geographic, economic, social, and religious/secular spheres) and belonging in the modern world. The students directly contrast their ways of being with those of more observant Jews. Identifiable by their rootedness, linguistic stringency, and, especially, their ways of dressing (e.g. wearing a kippah in public), the embodied practices and visibility of observant Jews are perceived to be impediments to participation and success in the secular realm. For Talmud Torah students, the public kippah in particular indexes a religious individual and a "backwards" and undesirable life. However, when Jewishness appears in their school classrooms, it is usually visually represented by orthodox-presenting men – often a man in a white shirt and black kippah. In the school classroom, these men and their kippot are framed as representing all Jews, understood as a homogenous group of adherents to the religion Judaism. For many Talmud Torah students, their first encounter with this new meaning of the kippah, visualization and associated conceptualization of Jewishness is jarring – they suddenly find themselves on the 'wrong' side of the religious/secular divide and grouped together with those from whom they could not feel more distant. Based on 31 months of ethnographic fieldwork with Luxembourg's Liberal Jewish community, this paper will explore how the kippah is remediated from the Talmud Torah to the school classroom, how students grapple with this uncomfortable process, and some of its implications. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailWhen a Master Dies: Speculation and Asset Float
Penasse, Julien UL; Renneboog, Luc; Scheinkman, José

in Review of Financial Studies (2021), 34(8), 38403879

Detailed reference viewed: 61 (2 UL)