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See detailWhat Public Keys Can Do for Three-Party, Password-Authenticated Key Exchange
Lancrenon, Jean UL

in Sokratis; Agudo, Isaac (Eds.) Public Key Infrastructures, Services and Applications: 10th European Workshop, EuroPKI 2013, Egham, UK, September 12-13, 2013, Revised Selected Papers (2014, September)

We study three-party, password-authenticated key exchange protocols where the trusted third party has a high-entropy private key to which corresponds a public key. In this scenario we can maintain the ... [more ▼]

We study three-party, password-authenticated key exchange protocols where the trusted third party has a high-entropy private key to which corresponds a public key. In this scenario we can maintain the user-friendliness of password authentication while provably achieving security properties that ordinary password-authenticated key exchange protocols cannot, namely resistance against key compromise impersonation and a special form of internal state revealing. We define security models tailored to our case and illustrate our work with several protocols. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat research agenda could be generated from the European General Practice Research Network concept of Multimorbidity in Family Practice?
Le Reste, J. Y.; Nabbe, P.; Lingner, H. et al

in BMC family practice (2015), 16(1), 125

BACKGROUND: Multimorbidity is an intuitively appealing, yet challenging, concept for Family Medicine (FM). An EGPRN working group has published a comprehensive definition of the concept based on a ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Multimorbidity is an intuitively appealing, yet challenging, concept for Family Medicine (FM). An EGPRN working group has published a comprehensive definition of the concept based on a systematic review of the literature which is closely linked to patient complexity and to the biopsychosocial model. This concept was identified by European Family Physicians (FPs) throughout Europe using 13 qualitative surveys. To further our understanding of the issues around multimorbidity, we needed to do innovative research to clarify this concept. The research question for this survey was: what research agenda could be generated for Family Medicine from the EGPRN concept of Multimorbidity? METHODS: Nominal group design with a purposive panel of experts in the field of multimorbidity. The nominal group worked through four phases: ideas generation phase, ideas recording phase, evaluation and analysis phase and a prioritization phase. RESULTS: Fifteen international experts participated. A research agenda was established, featuring 6 topics and 11 themes with their corresponding study designs. The highest priorities were given to the following topics: measuring multimorbidity and the impact of multimorbidity. In addition the experts stressed that the concept should be simplified. This would be best achieved by working in reverse: starting with the outcomes and working back to find the useful variables within the concept. CONCLUSION: The highest priority for future research on multimorbidity should be given to measuring multimorbidity and to simplifying the EGPRN model, using a pragmatic approach to determine the useful variables within the concept from its outcomes. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat role for (alleged) victims in the forum choice?
Simonato, Michele UL

Presentation (2015, September 01)

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See detailWhat role for planning in the Western Balkans?
Blondel, Cyril UL

Scientific Conference (2010, February)

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See detailWhat Security for Electronic Exams?
Giustolisi, Rosario UL; Lenzini, Gabriele UL; Bella, Giampaolo

in 8th International Conference onRisk and Security of Internet and Systems (CRiSIS), 2013 (2013)

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See detailWhat Social Inequalities of Quality of Life (NEWSQOL domains) amongst patients does appear, two years after a stroke?
Baumann, Michèle UL; Lurbe-Puerto, Katia UL; Le Bihan, Etienne UL

in European Society for Health and Medical Sociology (2010)

The quality of live “capability” must be taken into consideration because it affects stroke patients’ ability to make health choices. We aimed to analyse the relations between their socio-demographic ... [more ▼]

The quality of live “capability” must be taken into consideration because it affects stroke patients’ ability to make health choices. We aimed to analyse the relations between their socio-demographic characteristics and their quality of life (domains selected: interpersonal relationship, emotions, feelings, pain, sleep, fatigue). Methods: Two years after their stroke, 72 volunteers participated to a Luxembourg national survey. Completed at their home, the questionnaire included the six NEWSQOL* domains that responded to the criterion of an absence of direct consequence of the injuries caused by the stroke. For each domain, a multiple regression model was fit and adjusted by impairments (motor, vision, sensory, language, and memory). We performed a backward selection discarding, in succession, variables associated with highest p-values, until we obtained a set of explanatory variables significantly linked at the 10% level. Results: To be a woman is positively linked to a better quality of life (interpersonal relationships, feelings, sleep). The older patients and the ones living in couple have a less good quality of life with regards to fatigue. The current professional situation does not have any impact on quality of life; which is not the case for the occupation at the time of the stroke. Compared to the executives’ ones, the patients who never had a job, employees, and manual workers have a worse quality of life in terms of feelings. The manual workers, employees and the ones who never had a job show a minor good quality of life in relation to fatigue. When the patients’ educational level is lower than the first cycle of secondary education, their quality of life deteriorates in terms of interpersonal relationship, emotion, feelings, pain. After the stroke, changes in the financial position resulted in a less good quality of life in relation to interpersonal relationship, feelings, pain, sleep, whilst the ones in the occupational situation only worsened patients’ feelings and fatigue. “Feelings” (depression, control, independent) is the most associated NEWSQOL-domain with the socio-economic factors. Conclusion: Patients’ level of education and the changes in their financial position are determinants of social inequalities of quality of life amongst stroke survivors. A better elementary health education on stroke would make upcoming patients to gain in quality of life capacity. They will better adhere to the advice given within the therapeutics framework and psychological counseling as well as to the social accompaniment provided and the administrative requirements they have to accomplish to obtain financial aids. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat strategies are effective for exercise adherence in heart failure? A systematic review of controlled studies.
Tierney, Stephanie; Mamas, Mamas; Woods, Stephen et al

in Heart failure reviews (2012), 17(1), 107-15

Physical activity is recommended for people with stable heart failure (HF), because it is known to improve quality of life and health outcomes. However, adherence to this recommendation has been poor in ... [more ▼]

Physical activity is recommended for people with stable heart failure (HF), because it is known to improve quality of life and health outcomes. However, adherence to this recommendation has been poor in many studies. A systematic review was conducted to examine the effectiveness of strategies used to promote exercise adherence in those with HF. The following databases were searched for relevant literature published between January 1980 and December 2010: British Nursing Index; CINAHL; Cochrane Library; Embase; Medline and PsycINFO. Papers with a control group focused on adults with HF that measured exercise or physical activity adherence were included. Nine randomised controlled trials were identified, involving a total of 3,231 patients (range 16-2,331). Six of these studies were informed by specific psychological theories. Positive outcomes occurred in the short-term from interventions using approaches such as exercise prescriptions, goal setting, feedback and problem-solving. However, longer-term maintenance of exercise was less successful. There was some support for interventions underpinned by theoretical frameworks, but more research is required to make clearer recommendations. Addressing self-efficacy in relation to exercise may be a particularly useful area to consider in this respect. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat Tendency for "Inquiry" and "Language": Examining Key Journals in Science Education
de Albuquerque Trigo, Maiza UL; Siry, Christina UL

Scientific Conference (2021, November 10)

Conducting a review of the literature can provide a foundation for understanding research trajectories in a given field, and this proposed presentation will explore one literature review mapping that has ... [more ▼]

Conducting a review of the literature can provide a foundation for understanding research trajectories in a given field, and this proposed presentation will explore one literature review mapping that has been conducted to guide a PhD research project relating primary science education and multilingual learning contexts. A first generic search with the terms “teacher education”, “primary education”, “science education”, “inquiry” and “language” led to an overwhelmingly high number of publications to be gathered and analyzed. So, the path of searching articles in the main scope of the research (science education) was chosen, towards the elaboration of an analytic review map. This mapping consists of a database that was built with articles retrieved from six key journals’ official website (identified through JCR/Scimago ranking), funneling the scope to “teacher education” in primary level (and elementary, for the USA context), and focusing on how the words “inquiry” and “language” emerge in these publications starting from 2008 (after the Rocard report, from 2007). This type of data is presented by the frequency of occurrences and analyzed by theme cluster for tendency construct, using content analysis. The first set of data extracted from one journal (CSSE) shows that “language” and “inquiry” appear in 35 documents, but the number of appearances in titles decreases to three occurrences, narrowed to two titles (one title overlaps both terms); serving as an example of an area to be potentially explored. In order to tackle how the implications and overlaps between language learning and science education (focusing on the inquiry-based method) are presented in published articles, the qualitative analysis exposes two set of results: 1. Occurrence and thematic mapping from a social-cultural perspective; 2. A set of meanings and its relevance to the topics as relations between the use of the words “inquiry” and “language” are drawn. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat the D does to history. Das digitale Zeitalter als neues historisches Zeitregime?
Fickers, Andreas UL

in Karoline, Döring; Stefan, Haas; Mareike, König (Eds.) et al Digital History Konzepte, Methoden und Kritiken Digitaler Geschichtswissenschaft (2022)

The digital interferes in multiple ways in our current day practice of history. This article argues that it not only impacts the way we search, store, analyze, and visualize historical sources and how we ... [more ▼]

The digital interferes in multiple ways in our current day practice of history. This article argues that it not only impacts the way we search, store, analyze, and visualize historical sources and how we tell our stories, but the dynamic, real-time, and connected nature of digital research infrastructures and the Internet has a deep influence on how we think about history. As a new temporal regime, the digital age shapes our memory practices and changes the way we imagine and experience the past. By mobilizing the concept of digital hermeneutics, the chapter proposes a conceptual framework that helps to understand the various interferences of the „D“ and to use the critical potential of humanities to deconstruct and contextualize our data-driven present. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat they highlight is ...: The discourse functions of basic wh-clefts in lectures.
Deroey, Katrien UL

in Journal of English for Academic Purposes (2012), 11(2), 112-124

This paper reports findings from a study on the discourse functions of basic wh-clefts such as what our brains do is complicated information processing in 160 lectures drawn from the British Academic ... [more ▼]

This paper reports findings from a study on the discourse functions of basic wh-clefts such as what our brains do is complicated information processing in 160 lectures drawn from the British Academic Spoken English (BASE) corpus. Like much linguistic research on this academic genre, the investigation is motivated by the need to gain a better understanding of language use in lectures to aid effective English for Academic Purposes (EAP) course design. To this end, the composition of the wh-clauses was analysed for its main constituents (subjects, verb phrases and modality) and the clefts were grouped according to their apparent main function and subfunction within the lecture discourse. The results show that basic wh-clefts mostly serve to highlight aspects of content information and there was also disciplinary variation in their use. Implications for EAP course design are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat they highlight is: the discourse functions of basic wh-clefts in lectures
Deroey, Katrien UL

Scientific Conference (2009, July)

As part of a study of lecture functions in general and highlighting devices in specific, this paper presents the findings of an investigation into the discourse functions of basic wh-cleft clauses in a ... [more ▼]

As part of a study of lecture functions in general and highlighting devices in specific, this paper presents the findings of an investigation into the discourse functions of basic wh-cleft clauses in a corpus of lectures. These clauses, such as What our brains do is complicated information processing, are identifying constructions which background the information in the relative clause (What our brains do) and present the information foregrounded in the complement (complicated information processing) as newsworthy. Corpus-based studies of this construction to date have mainly described its function in writing (Collins 1991, Herriman 2003 & 2004) and spontaneous speech (Collins 1991 & 2006). From his examination of wh-clefts in speech and writing, Collins (1991: 214) concludes that ‘the linear progression from explicitly represented non-news to news offers speakers an extended opportunity to formulate the message’, while Biber et al (1999: 963) note that in conversation, speakers may use this construction with its typically low information content as ‘a springboard in starting an utterance’. With regard to academic speech, Rowley-Jolivet & Carter-Thomas (2003) found that basic wh-clefts are particularly effective in conference presentations to highlight the New and that their apparent ‘underlying presupposed question’ (p. 57) adds a dialogic dimension to monologic speech. All these features suggest that wh-clefts may be a useful in lectures, which are typically monologic and mainly concerned with imparting information. So far, however, studies on the function of these clefts in lectures have generally focussed on the function of part of the wh-clause as a lexical bundle (Biber 2006, Nesi & Basturkmen 2006) and mostly discussed its role as a discourse organising device. For the current investigation, a corpus of 12 lectures drawn from the British Academic Spoken English (BASE) Corpus were analysed. This yielded 132 basic wh-clefts, which were classified for their main discourse functions based on the presence of certain lexico-grammatical features, the functional relationship between the clefts and their co-text and an understanding of the purposes of and disciplinary variation within the lecture genre. Four main functional categories thus emerged: informing, evaluating, discourse organizing, evaluating and managing the class. These functions of wh-clefts and their relative frequency are discussed and related to lecture purposes; incidental findings on their co-occurrence with pauses and discourse markers are also touched upon. The study of this highlighting device in a lecture corpus thus aims to contribute to our understanding of what happens in authentic lectures and how this is reflected in the language. References Biber, D. (2006). University language: a corpus-based study of spoken and written registers. Studies in Corpus Linguistics 23. Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company. Biber, D., S. Johansson, G. Leech, S. Conrad, & E. Finegan (1999). The Longman grammar of spoken and written English. London: Longman. Collins, P. C. (1991). Cleft and pseudo-cleft constructions in English. London: Routledge. Collins, P. C. (2006). It-clefts and wh-clefts: prosody and pragmatics. Journal of Pragmatics, 38, 1706-1720. Herriman, J. (2003). Negotiating identity: the interpersonal functions of wh-clefts in English. Functions of Language, 10 (1), 1-30. Herriman, J. (2004). Identifying relations: the semantic functions of wh-clefts in English. Text, 24 (4), 447-469. Nesi, H. & Basturkmen, H. (2006). Lexical bundles and discourse signalling in academic lectures. International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, 11 (3), 283-304. Rowley-Jolivet, E. & Carter-Thomas, S. (2005). Genre awareness and rhetorical appropriacy: manipulation of information structure by NS and NNS scientists in the international conference setting. English for Specific purposes, 24, 41-64. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat we can learn about ocean tides from tide gauge and gravity loading measurements?
Francis, Olivier UL; Mazzega, P.

in Kakkuri, Juhani (Ed.) Eleventh International Symposium on Earth Tides, Proceedings of the meeting held July 31 - August 5, 1989, in Helsinki, Finland (1991)

The harmonic constants from tide gauge stations and from gravity loading measurements of the ICET (International Center for Earth Tides) data bank are separately inverted to produce M2 cotidal maps on a ... [more ▼]

The harmonic constants from tide gauge stations and from gravity loading measurements of the ICET (International Center for Earth Tides) data bank are separately inverted to produce M2 cotidal maps on a global scale. The optimal interpolation of these data, based on the total inverse theory in L2 norm, makes use of a set of a priori stationary and isotropic covariance functions deduced from a global hydrodynamical model and from its corresponding gravity loading map. The preliminary results presented with formal error estimates are surprisingly good, in particular the M2 maps obtained from the numerous tide gauge data. These results are discussed and further lines of work are drawn. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat we know about testing embedded software
Garousi, Vahid UL; Felderer, Michael; Karapıçak, Çağrı Murat et al

in IEEE Software (2018), 35(4), 62-69

To cost-effectively test embedded software, practitioners and researchers have proposed many test techniques, approaches, tools, and frameworks. However, obtaining an overview of the state of the art and ... [more ▼]

To cost-effectively test embedded software, practitioners and researchers have proposed many test techniques, approaches, tools, and frameworks. However, obtaining an overview of the state of the art and state of the practice in this area is challenging for practitioners or new researchers. In addition, owing to an inadequate overview of what already exists in this area, some companies often reinvent the wheel by designing a test approach that’s new to them but already exists. To address these problems, the authors conducted a systematic literature review of this area that covered the testing topics, testing activities, test artifacts, and industries on which the studies focused. The results can benefit both practitioners and researchers by serving as an index to the vast body of knowledge in this important, fast-growing area. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat you give you get, or not? The effects of intergenerational family solidarity on subjective well-being
Albert, Isabelle UL; Barros Coimbra, Stephanie UL

Scientific Conference (2018, September 06)

Much attention has been focused on intergenerational relations and family cultures as these developments are, amongst others, related to important socio-demographic changes creating a new reality for ... [more ▼]

Much attention has been focused on intergenerational relations and family cultures as these developments are, amongst others, related to important socio-demographic changes creating a new reality for families in Europe. Thus, solidarity and mutual support between adult children and their older parents are of particular interest as the exchange and “amount” of mutual support between both generations might gain importance for the well-being of each family member. Additionally, the specific context of migration can arouse special needs in terms of intergenerational support. The current study presents a cross-cultural comparison between Luxembourgish native and Portuguese migrant families, all living in Luxembourg. Quantitative data (n = 118 family triads) gathered by means of standardised questionnaires as well as qualitative data (n = 20 family dyads) collected with face-to-face interviews underlie the discussed results. Regardless of the culture, quantitative results show a higher provided social support from parents to children than the received one. However, PT children reported receiving as much as providing social support to their parents, while LU children reported receiving more support than the one they give. Further analyses will be carried out in order to differentiate between different kinds of support (financial, instrumental and emotional) making use of quantitative as well as qualitative data. Implications regarding family solidarity will be discussed in order to highlight similarities and differences between and within cultures and family generations. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat You See is What it Means! Semantic Representation Learning of Code based on Visualization
Keller, Patrick UL; Kabore, Abdoul Kader UL; Plein, Laura et al

in ACM Transactions on Software Engineering and Methodology (2021)

Recent successes in training word embeddings for NLP tasks have encouraged a wave of research on representation learning for sourcecode, which builds on similar NLP methods. The overall objective is then ... [more ▼]

Recent successes in training word embeddings for NLP tasks have encouraged a wave of research on representation learning for sourcecode, which builds on similar NLP methods. The overall objective is then to produce code embeddings that capture the maximumof program semantics. State-of-the-art approaches invariably rely on a syntactic representation (i.e., raw lexical tokens, abstractsyntax trees, or intermediate representation tokens) to generate embeddings, which are criticized in the literature as non-robustor non-generalizable. In this work, we investigate a novel embedding approach based on the intuition that source code has visualpatterns of semantics. We further use these patterns to address the outstanding challenge of identifying semantic code clones. Wepropose theWySiWiM(“What You See Is What It Means”) approach where visual representations of source code are fed into powerfulpre-trained image classification neural networks from the field of computer vision to benefit from the practical advantages of transferlearning. We evaluate the proposed embedding approach on the task of vulnerable code prediction in source code and on two variationsof the task of semantic code clone identification: code clone detection (a binary classification problem), and code classification (amulti-classification problem). We show with experiments on the BigCloneBench (Java), Open Judge (C) that although simple, ourWySiWiMapproach performs as effectively as state of the art approaches such as ASTNN or TBCNN. We also showed with datafrom NVD and SARD thatWySiWiMrepresentation can be used to learn a vulnerable code detector with reasonable performance(accuracy∼90%). We further explore the influence of different steps in our approach, such as the choice of visual representations or theclassification algorithm, to eventually discuss the promises and limitations of this research direction. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat You See Is What You (Don’t) Get: A Comment on Funke’s (2014) Opinion Paper
Greiff, Samuel UL; Martin, Romain UL

in Frontiers in Psychology (2014), 5

Detailed reference viewed: 189 (9 UL)
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See detailWhat You should Believe
Boella, Guido UL; Pereira, Célia Da Costa UL; Pigozzi, Gabriella UL et al

in Proceedings of The 19th Belgian-Dutch Conference on Artificial Intelligence (BNAIC 2007) (2007)

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See detailWhat “taking place” means : Pierre Schoentjes’ écopoétique
Thiltges, Sébastian UL

in Ecozon@ (2016), 7(1),

Detailed reference viewed: 56 (1 UL)