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See detailTeaching and Learning in Natural Sciences for Grades 1-5
Thaçi, Lulzim; Mazreku, Ilir; Kastrati, Shpëtim et al

Book published by Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (2018)

In the time we are living today, education in natural sciences is very important, where scientific knowledge, rapid development of technology and science technology play an important role in our daily ... [more ▼]

In the time we are living today, education in natural sciences is very important, where scientific knowledge, rapid development of technology and science technology play an important role in our daily life. Most jobs today require workers to be able to learn, be rational, think creatively and critically, make decisions, and solve problems. Understanding science and scientific processes help to develop these skills. Students are required to develop understanding of scientific concepts, conduct experiments, observe, learn from their practices, and contribute to their education learning processes by affecting both affective and cognitive skills as well as psychomotor skills. Recent research on learning in natural sciences shows that school today is not effective in achieving these goals, where an important reason is the lack of motivation and interest of students in natural sciences. In Kosovo, as well as in other countries, learning natural sciences at school is often considered difficult, meaningless, uninteresting, and irrelevant to the students' future. First results of the PISA International Assessment conducted in 2015 are very disappointing and confirm that the quality of education in Kosovo needs to improve urgently. The performance of Kosovo students in the natural sciences test is ranked at the bottom compared to all participating countries in this assessment, where most of the students from Kosovo have not achieved base competencies and skills up to the age of 15. PISA results also point to serious shortfalls in Kosovo with regards to other aspects of education quality, including teaching and learning in schools. These problems have also been identified by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (MEST), which in 2011 started preparations for changing the curricula at the pre-university level and started implementing it in all schools of Kosovo in 2017. This new curriculum is based on the competences of the 21st century. It is based on the achievement of competency scores for each of the 6 curriculum stages, where for primary education the results of competences for stages 1 and 2 have been compiled, the achievement of which is done through learning in natural sciences. The success of students in natural sciences depends on the work and dedication of teachers and students. This is achieved by using modern interactive and comprehensive approaches, methods, techniques and different forms of work. Many procedures are used for this purpose such as, new information, exercises, assignments, project work, practical work, etc. Various materials and tools such as models, diagrams and tables, chemical substances, tools from the kitchen or laboratory, instruments, computers and other educational technologies should also be used. This approach and these methods should serve to encourage independent, critical and creative thinking of students. For all these changes, we must have the well-trained teachers. This can be achieved through continuous teacher professional development, as well as continuous cooperation between them. [less ▲]

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See detailTeaching and learning of natural science in grades 1-5 of primary school: Manual for teacher training
Musai, Bardhyl; Andersen, Katja Natalie UL; Kastrati, Rexhep et al

Book published by Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (2013)

Natural science education is an important part of general education of children at school. In the era of information explosion and the rapid development of technology, it is impossible for the school to ... [more ▼]

Natural science education is an important part of general education of children at school. In the era of information explosion and the rapid development of technology, it is impossible for the school to be a place which transmit information to children and require from them to memorize. Kosovo, as other Western Balkan countries, aims to join the EU in a near future, which means its strategic goal is to be a knowledge society, i.e. one that, among other things, equips schoolchildren with lifelong skills and gives them opportunities to build and create their knowledge, instead of transmitting information. School enables children to use discovery skills as scientists do, solve problems and actively participate in knowledge construction. Education in natural science subjects in Kosovo during the past decade has marked a continous progress. In 2001, the new objective-based curriculum was drafted, which differs from the previous traditional system by integrating the natural sciences into a common and very qualitative programme. However, efforts to raise the quality in education continue, and teachers are aware that their subject contents should be transformed further, and the teaching methods should be enriched. Teacher training needs are identified and analyzed in the survey “Overview on Training Needs of Education Management Staff and Subject Teachers in Mathematics and Natural Sciences” This survey was carried out by the “Capacity Development in the Basic Education Sector in Kosovo” (GIZ/CDBE) Programme. [less ▲]

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See detailTeaching Communicative and Intercultural Competence
Byram, Michael UL

in Lend: Lingua e nuova didattica (2013), XLII(2), 34-43

Detailed reference viewed: 106 (1 UL)
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See detailTeaching Complex Problem Solving Through Digital Game Design
Akcaoglu, Mete; Sonnleitner, Philipp UL; Hodges, Carl et al

Scientific Conference (2016, April)

Problem solving is one of the most essential skills for individuals to be successful at their daily lives and careers. When problems become complex, solving them involves identifying relationships among a ... [more ▼]

Problem solving is one of the most essential skills for individuals to be successful at their daily lives and careers. When problems become complex, solving them involves identifying relationships among a multitude of interrelated variables, to achieve multiple different possible solutions. Teaching Complex Problem Solving (CPS) skills in formal education contexts is challenging. In this research, we examined if through an innovative game-design course middle school students improved in their CPS skills. Our results showed that students showed significant improvements in their CPS skills, especially in terms of system exploration, t(10) = 2.787, p = .019; system knowledge, t(10) = 2.437, p = .35; system application, t(10) = 2.472, p = .033. In addition, there was a statistically significant change in students’ interest for CPS after attending the GDL program, t(6) = 3.890, p = .008. We discuss implications regarding use of game-design tasks as contexts to teach CPS skills in formal and informal educational contexts. [less ▲]

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See detailTeaching DevOps in Academia and Industry: Reflections and Vision
Bobrov, Evgeny; Bucchiarone, Antonio; Capozucca, Alfredo UL et al

in Bruel, Jean-Michel; Mazzara, Manuel; Meyer, Bertrand (Eds.) Software Engineering Aspects of Continuous Development and New Paradigms of Software Production and Deployment (2020, January 19)

The new century brought us a kind of renaissance in software development methods. The advent of the Agile manifesto has led to greater appreciation of methodologies aimed at producing valuable software ... [more ▼]

The new century brought us a kind of renaissance in software development methods. The advent of the Agile manifesto has led to greater appreciation of methodologies aimed at producing valuable software through continuous incremental cycles. More recently, a new set of practices enclosed under the term DevOps has appeared to attain manifesto's objectives in more efficient manner. The software development community has already noticed the benefits brought by DevOps. Thus, the necessity of education in the field becomes more and more important, both from the technical and organisational point of view. This paper describes parallel experiences of teaching both undergraduate and graduate students at the university, and junior professional developers in industry, compares the two approaches and sums up the lessons learnt. A vision driven by the DevOps practices aimed at implementing a shift in the Software Engineering Higher Education curricula to takeover its current limitations is also reported at the end of the paper. [less ▲]

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See detailTeaching DevOps in academia and industry: reflections and vision
Bobrov, Evgeny; Bucchiarone, Antonio; Capozucca, Alfredo UL et al

Report (2019)

This paper describes our experience of delivery educational programs in academia and in industry on DevOps, compare the two approaches and sum-up the lessons learnt. We also propose a vision to implement ... [more ▼]

This paper describes our experience of delivery educational programs in academia and in industry on DevOps, compare the two approaches and sum-up the lessons learnt. We also propose a vision to implement a shift in the Software Engineering Higher Education curricula. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 124 (11 UL)
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See detailTeaching Diverse Learners in Europe: Inspiring Practices and Lessons Learned from Germany, Iceland, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Spain and Sweden
Powell, Justin J W UL; Merz-Atalik, Kerstin; Ališauskienė, Stefanija et al

in Schuelka, Matthew; Johnstone, Christopher; Thomas, Gary (Eds.) et al SAGE Handbook of Inclusion and Diversity in Education (2019)

Teaching in inclusive settings may be considered a new, challenging task; however, successfully supporting diverse pupils in their learning process has always been at the heart of outstanding pedagogy ... [more ▼]

Teaching in inclusive settings may be considered a new, challenging task; however, successfully supporting diverse pupils in their learning process has always been at the heart of outstanding pedagogy. Vast differences both in the extent and the quality of inclusive schooling exist between and within European countries. Promoting comparison and cooperation among countries with long-institutionalized inclusive schooling and countries with less inclusive structures, cultures, and practices proves crucial in education research and reform. Building upon a multi-year collaboration, we synthesize lessons learned about inclusive education reforms and “inspiring practices“ in inclusive education in partner schools in Germany, Iceland, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Spain, and Sweden. Contemporary practices take the diversity of groups of learners into account, building upon diversity as a resource; this served as the framework for our collaboration. The TdiverS consortium—as an EU-funded Comenius Network Project “Teaching Diverse Learners in (School-)Subjects“ (TdiverS)—was built on the following principles and goals: (1) diversity in theory and practice, resulting from collaborations of practitioners and scientists exchanging knowledge about teaching in inclusive settings; (2) strengthening awareness of the diversity of frameworks, conditions, and determining factors of teaching inclusively in varying cultural contexts; and (3) inclusive education research uniting multilevel, multicultural, and multidisciplinary perspectives. We highlight the values of inclusive education, map its contemporary European geography, summarize contemporary country-level education reforms and the local development of inclusive practices in six countries, and discuss lessons learned across Northern, Eastern, Southern, and Western Europe. [less ▲]

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See detailTeaching Foreign Languages in the Primary School: Principles and Practice.
Kirsch, Claudine UL

Book published by Continuum (2008)

Detailed reference viewed: 281 (2 UL)
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See detailTeaching languages in contact: the case of Luxembourg and Catalonia
Ehrhart, Sabine UL

Scientific Conference (2017, November 09)

Detailed reference viewed: 107 (3 UL)
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See detailteaching movies
Weber, Jean-Marie UL; Reuter, Anne-Marie

Scientific Conference (2012, December 17)

Detailed reference viewed: 108 (6 UL)
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See detailTeaching Multilingual Academic discourse at the University of Luxembourg
Huemer, Birgit UL

in Donahue, Christiane (Ed.) Teaching and Studying Transnational Composition (2023)

Detailed reference viewed: 77 (8 UL)
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See detailTeaching Public and Applied History on Both Sides of the Atlantic
Cauvin, Thomas UL; Bijsterveld, Arnoud-Jan; De Ridder, Bram et al

Speeches/Talks (2022)

n times of global crises, people turn to history to understand their own and their society’s situation. This is an issue addressed by those active in the field of public history. In this roundtable ... [more ▼]

n times of global crises, people turn to history to understand their own and their society’s situation. This is an issue addressed by those active in the field of public history. In this roundtable, teachers share their experiences with academic courses training students on both sides of the Atlantic in taking stock of public and applied history. First, students investigate how specific audiences have dealt with historic events, periods, or developments considered to be collective or cultural traumas. Secondly, students design a product or project targeted at a specific audience, online or offline, aiming to reconstruct, contextualize, and represent a specific topic. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 70 (2 UL)
See detailTeaching Public History in UK Higher Education
Cauvin, Thomas UL

Speeches/Talks (2022)

About this event Welcome: The AHRC-funded 'What is Public History Now?' Network is thrilled to invite you to our first workshop 'Teaching Public History in UK Higher Education'. We hope you'll join us for ... [more ▼]

About this event Welcome: The AHRC-funded 'What is Public History Now?' Network is thrilled to invite you to our first workshop 'Teaching Public History in UK Higher Education'. We hope you'll join us for a day of discussions on public history in higher education, ranging from intellectual traditions to pedagogy and programme design. Schedule: 13 May, 10am-12am; 2pm-4pm; 4:30-6:00pm. 10am-11am: Intellectual traditions and the history of UK public history 11am-12pm: Public history in the UK and in International Context What is distinct about public history in the UK? What are the particular dynamics of regions/smaller nations? How does this sit within the international context? 2pm-4pm: Pedagogy and Programme Design What are we teaching? Who are we teaching? How are we teaching? Why are we teaching it? The growth of public history programmes and the inflection of wider history teaching with public history. The relationship of public history and heritage programmes. Break out rooms to discuss and compare modules and programmes. 4:30pm-5:30pm: Policy and Institutional Support Why now? The impact agenda and the neoliberal university. What resources are we being given or not given? 5:30pm-6:00pm: Final Thoughts and Plans for the Next Workshop [less ▲]

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See detailTeaching the underlying rules of figural matrices in a short video increases test scores
Schneider, Benedikt; Becker, Nicolas; Krieger, Florian UL et al

in Intelligence (2020), 82

Scores of commonly administered intelligence tests such as figural matrices are important correlates of external criteria. However, evidence of improving intelligence test scores through practice or ... [more ▼]

Scores of commonly administered intelligence tests such as figural matrices are important correlates of external criteria. However, evidence of improving intelligence test scores through practice or coaching has been reported. Moreover, information about intelligence tests is widely and easily accessible (e.g., online tutorial videos). An open research question is whether watching such a video increases figural matrices test scores and affects the correlation with other intelligence tests. In two experiments (experiment 1: N = 112 psychology students; experiment 2: N = 229 teacher-education students), students were randomly assigned to either an experimental group that watched a short video (< 14 min) explaining a set of rules underlying figural matrices or a control group that watched a task irrelevant video of comparable duration. Afterwards, both groups worked on figural matrices. Prior to watching the video, all students completed an intelligence test. Results showed (1) substantially higher figural matrices mean test scores in the experimental groups compared to the control groups (d ≥ 1.19) and (2) substantial correlations between figural matrix test scores and intelligence test scores in both the experimental and the control groups. These correlations were of comparable magnitude and did not differ between the groups (experiment 1: r ≈ .55; experiment 2: r ≈ .40). Implications of these findings are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailTeaching with Information and Communication Technologies: Results of a Large Scale Survey
Linckels, Serge UL; Kreis, Yves UL; Reuter, Robert UL et al

in Farally-Semerad, Gail; McRitchie, Karen; Rugg, Beth (Eds.) SIGUCCS '09: Proceedings of the 37th annual ACM SIGUCCS fall conference: communication and collaboration (2009)

On behalf of the Ministry of Education in Luxembourg (Europe), 821 teachers - from primary school to higher education - were questioned in an online survey at the beginning of 2009 about their use of ... [more ▼]

On behalf of the Ministry of Education in Luxembourg (Europe), 821 teachers - from primary school to higher education - were questioned in an online survey at the beginning of 2009 about their use of information and communication technologies (ICT) in education. In this paper, we briefly present the context of the questionnaire and will then focus on its outcomes. The preliminary analysis of the results will mainly focus on the closed questions of the survey and try to answer several fundamental questions related to the availability, as well as to the current and the future usage of ICT in schools. Most of the teachers use ICT in some way in education, but printed documents remain the most popular source of information during class. The main argument listed to use ICT is the increase of students' motivation, while the major concern is the technical hardware dependency or unavailability. Also, an important number of teachers is concerned about the increased preparation time that is in most cases not rewarded. Finally, a vast majority of the teachers is willing to take part in an e-learning training program, probably because they feel unqualified or do not (yet) see the advantage of ICT for their classes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 90 (18 UL)
See detailTeaching with trade books: Wonderful, wiggly worms
Siry, Christina UL

in Science and Children (2006), 43(7), 14-16

The article presents information about teaching worm behavior in a science classroom with the help of books like "Wiggling Worms at Work," by Wendy Pfeffer and "Squirmy Wormy Composters," by Bobbie Kalman ... [more ▼]

The article presents information about teaching worm behavior in a science classroom with the help of books like "Wiggling Worms at Work," by Wendy Pfeffer and "Squirmy Wormy Composters," by Bobbie Kalman and Janine Schaub. While the former book helps students understand the role organisms play in an ecosystem, the latter provides reference materials that can be used by students in designing experiments. With the examination of worms' body structure and behavior, students gain an appreciation of the ecological importance of worms. Experimenting with living creature in the classroom, it is equally important to follow appropriate safety guidelines including washing hands before and after handling worms. One such K-3 grade experiment is to create a worm jar to observe the tunneling behavior of worms. [less ▲]

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See detailTeam Approaches to Treating Children with Disabilities: A Comparison
Rosen, Carol; Miller, A. Cate; Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL et al

in Archives of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation (1998), 79(4), 430-434

Objective: To investigate differences in team functioning between the multidisciplinary and transdisciplinary models when treating children with disabilities. Design: A crossover trial. Setting: An ... [more ▼]

Objective: To investigate differences in team functioning between the multidisciplinary and transdisciplinary models when treating children with disabilities. Design: A crossover trial. Setting: An outpatient educational and rehabilitation program in a rehabilitation institute based at a university medical center. Participants: A population-based sample of 19 rehabilitation specialists and educators. Intervention: Participants attended four team meetings using the multidisciplinary approach and then attended four team meetings using the transdisciplinary approach. Outcome Measures: Behavioral ratings of team participation (Transdisciplinary Team Rating Scale) and self-report instruments of team development (Team Assessment Questionnaire) and treatment planning and goal development (Staff Perception Questionnaire). Results: Results of t tests confirmed the hypothesis that there was more team member participation during transdisciplinary meetings than during multidisciplinary meetings (p = .027), There were no differences in levels of team development (p = .329); however, staff members favored the transdisciplinary model for treatment planning and goal development (p < .001). Conclusion: This study provides evidence of the effectiveness of the transdisciplinary model. Further research is now needed to investigate outcome variables such as rate of success in attaining treatment goals when using this model. [less ▲]

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See detailTeam members’ network and the performance of new product development: the strength of strong ties
Brion, Sébastien; Chauvet, Vincent; Chollet, Barthelemy et al

Scientific Conference (2009)

Detailed reference viewed: 58 (0 UL)
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See detailTeam members’ network and the performance of new product development: the strength of strong ties
Brion, Sébastien; Chauvet, Vincent; Chollet, Barthelemy et al

Scientific Conference (2009)

Detailed reference viewed: 39 (0 UL)
See detailTechnical Aspects of Intergeo
Kreis, Yves UL; Kortenkamp, Ulrich

Scientific Conference (2010, July 02)

• Formal Descriptions of Constructions, Exercises and other Digital Content in Mathematics • Data Exchange in Mathematics and Mathematics Education • Comparison of Interactive Geometry Tools • Mathematics ... [more ▼]

• Formal Descriptions of Constructions, Exercises and other Digital Content in Mathematics • Data Exchange in Mathematics and Mathematics Education • Comparison of Interactive Geometry Tools • Mathematics Education and Social Networks/Web 2.0 • Integration of Digital Content in the Classroom • Innovative Uses of ICT in Teaching Mathematics [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 49 (6 UL)