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See detailTeachers’ school tracking decisions
Böhmer, Ines; Gräsel, Cornelia; Krolak-Schwerdt, Sabine UL et al

in Leutner, Detlev; Fleischer, Jens; Grünkorn, Juliane (Eds.) et al Competence assessment in education: Research, models, and instruments (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 233 (17 UL)
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See detailTeachers’ translanguaging stance, design, and shifts in a professional development course
Aleksic, Gabrijela UL; Bebic, Dzoen Dominique UL

Scientific Conference (2019, October 28)

Classrooms in Luxembourg are highly socially, culturally, and linguistically diverse. About 65% of 4 year-old children do not speak Luxembourgish, of which 28% speak Portuguese (MENJE, 2018). In 2017, the ... [more ▼]

Classrooms in Luxembourg are highly socially, culturally, and linguistically diverse. About 65% of 4 year-old children do not speak Luxembourgish, of which 28% speak Portuguese (MENJE, 2018). In 2017, the new law has declared multilingual early education mandatory. Until that time, the focus was solely on the development of Luxemburgish, whereas now teachers should also familiarize children with French and value their home languages. To support preschool teachers, our project aims to: (1) offer a professional development (PD) course in translanguaging, (2) involve children’s families to reinforce home-school collaboration, and (3) foster children’s cognitive, linguistic, and socio-emotional engagement in the classroom. We use focus groups, questionnaires, and language portraits with teachers and a test in early literacy and numeracy in school and home language and video observations with children. Translanguaging, the main topic of our 22 hour PD course (June – December 2019), is the use of a full linguistic repertoire to make meaning (Otheguy, García, & Reid, 2015). Through focus groups, we identified teachers’ negative translanguaging stance towards children’s proficiency in their home language that hinders the development of Luxembourgish. Translanguaging design was related to teachers’ use of multilingual stories and morning greetings, while translanguaging shifts concerned frequent translations by involving older children. Our main goal is to address the negative translanguaging stance by offering practical activities during the course and collaborating with parents, children, and organisational stakeholders. References Ministry of National Education, Childhood and Youth [MENJE]. (2018). Key numbers of the national education: statistics and indicators – School year 2016-2017. Retrieved from http://www.men.public.lu/fr/actualites/publications/themes-transversaux/statistiques-analyses/chiffres-cles/index.html Otheguy, R., García, O., & Reid, W. (2015). Clarifying translanguaging and deconstructing named languages: A perspective from linguistics. Applied Linguistic Review, 6(3), 281–307. [less ▲]

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See detailTeachers’ typology of student categories. A cluster analytic study
Hörstermann, Thomas UL; Krolak-Schwerdt, Sabine UL

in Gaul, Wolfgang; Geyer-Schulz, Andreas; Schmidt-Thieme, Lars (Eds.) et al Studies in classification, data analysis and knowledge organization (2012)

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See detailTeachers’, parents’ and children’s perspectives of teaching and learning Greek in a complementary school in Luxembourg
Kirsch, Claudine UL

in Panagiotopoulou, Julie; Rosen, Lisa; Kirsch, Claudine (Eds.) et al 'New' Migration of Families from Greece to Europe and Canada (2019)

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See detailTeachers’, parents’ and students’ perspectives’ on teaching and learning Greek in a community school in Luxembourg
Kirsch, Claudine UL

Scientific Conference (2017, August 25)

Many scholars have been interested in studying patterns of language shift or maintenance of migrants during their diaspora. One way of sustaining the development of the home language is through attending ... [more ▼]

Many scholars have been interested in studying patterns of language shift or maintenance of migrants during their diaspora. One way of sustaining the development of the home language is through attending a complementary school. This paper explores the differing perspectives on teaching and learning Greek in a complementary school in Luxembourg. The participants include the two teachers of this school, the mothers of three newly migrated families and their children. Like most children of newly migrated Greek families, the children in this study attend a state schools where they learn Luxembourgish, German and French (Gogonas & Kirsch 2016). They attend the Greek school one afternoon a week for three hours. The data stem from a survey with 37 parents and interviews with the teachers, parents and children. The findings of the survey indicate that the parents expect the school to develop high competences in Greek and knowledge of Greek culture and history. The newly arrived families have higher expectations than the established ones (Frygana 2016). The thematic analysis of the interviews indicates that the teachers adhered to a monolingual policy and reinforced a sense of “Greekness” by focusing on the Greek language and teaching some elements of culture (Tsagkogeorga 2016). They were aware that the multilingual children had different school experiences depending on their language competence and friendships. The children’s experiences varied in the light of their age and the teaching approaches. While the younger children saw little purpose in attending the school, the older child could make connections between the Greek school, the state school and her life and was motivated to learn Greek. The findings of this paper encourage teachers to reflect on their language policies and teaching approaches, and encourage them to capitalize on their students’ heterogeneity. [less ▲]

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See detailTeachers´ Attitudes toward Students with High- and Low-Educated Parents
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Glock, Sabine UL

Scientific Conference (2019, February)

Background In several countries, school tracking is used to group students with similar academic potential to optimize instruction. Teachers often have a more or less deciding vote, which school track ... [more ▼]

Background In several countries, school tracking is used to group students with similar academic potential to optimize instruction. Teachers often have a more or less deciding vote, which school track would suit different students based on academic achievement and potential (Ansalone and Biafora, 2004). Given the differential qualifications associated with completion of the different school tracks, teachers’ abilities to correctly assign students to different tracks will not only affect the students´ educational pathways, but also has a long lasting effect on career opportunities and general wellbeing in future adult life. Research shows that tracking recommendations mainly rely on students’ abilities (e.g., Caro, et al., 2009; Klapproth, et al., 2013; Marks, 2006). However, non-academic related student characteristics such as the socioeconomic status (SES) of the parents and —closely related (Reardon, 2011)—the parental educational level also affect teachers´ tracking decisions, either indirectly via grades or directly via the tracking decision itself (Bauer and Riphahn, 2006; Caro et al., 2009; de Boer, et al., 2010; Ditton, Krüsken, and Schauenberg, 2005; Maaz, et al., 2008; Timmermans, et al., 2015; Wagner, et al., 2009). Indeed, research has provided evidence for such stereotype bias in teachers’ judgments, leading to disadvantages for certain social groups (Peterson, et al., 2016; van den Bergh, et al., 2010). Hence, the aim of our study was the investigation of teachers’ attitudes toward students in relation to the educational level of parents. Method The aim of the current study was to investigate teachers´ implicit and explicit attitudes toward students with differentially educated parents. Implicit attitudes were measured using an implicit association task (IAT). The first name of the student was used as a proxy for the educational level of parents (see Onland & Bloothooft, 2008), whereby we created separate versions for boys and girls. Participating teachers (N=70) were randomly divided in two groups whereby the first group completed the IAT-boys version and the other group the IAT-girls version. Explicit attitudes were measured using a questionnaire (adapted from Glock, et al., 2016). Results: Participants indicated positive implicit attitudes toward students with highly educated parents, independent of the gender of the student. More specifically, an independent t test revealed that the mean IAT-D scores for boys and girls did not differ, t(68)=0.47, p=.64, d=0.12. The IAT-D score for the whole sample (M=0.81, SD=0.61) was significantly different from zero, t(69)=11.14, p<.001, d=1.33, reflecting more positive implicit attitudes toward highly educated parents. Teachers did not express differential explicit beliefs regarding the learning and social behaviors of students based on the educational level of the parents (i.e., subscale scores were significantly lower than the mean of the scale, t(65)=4.26, p<.001, d=0.53), whereas their expectations concerning the motivation and ambitions or educational chances of these students were neutral. Although the three subscales within the explicit attitudes measure were substantially associated (correlations ranging from r = .39 to r =.74), no association between explicit and implicit attitudes measures was found (correlations range from r = -.07 to r = .08). Conclusion: Teachers’ attitudes seem to be an important factor, which can guide teachers´ judgments and behaviors, and could partly explain differences in educational equity for students with similar academic profiles, but differentially educated parents. The positive implicit attitudes in favor of students with highly educated parents imply more favorable judgments for and behavior toward these students and deeper work is required to ensure teachers’ fair treatment of all students. The dissociation between implicit and explicit attitudes may be an indication of the social sensitivity of the relationship between students´ social background and educational achievements and opportunities. [less ▲]

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See detailTeachers´ Attitudes toward Students with High- and Low-Educated Parents
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Glock, Sabine UL

in Social Psychology of Education (2018), 21(3), 725-742

Educational inequalities may be derived from differential teacher expectations toward students from different backgrounds. Such expectations may be associated with stereotypical beliefs and attitudes ... [more ▼]

Educational inequalities may be derived from differential teacher expectations toward students from different backgrounds. Such expectations may be associated with stereotypical beliefs and attitudes, which guide behavior and judgments. Although ample research is available concerning differential teacher attitudes based on student ethnicity, few studies have considered the effect of the educational level of the parents. The aim of the current study was to investigate teachers´ implicit and explicit attitudes toward students with differentially educated parents. Implicit attitudes were measured using an implicit association task (IAT). The first name of the student was used as a proxy for the educational level of parents, whereby we created separate versions for boys and girls. Participants were randomly divided in two groups whereby the first group completed the IAT-boys version and the other group the IAT-girls version. Explicit attitudes were measured using a questionnaire. Participants indicated positive implicit attitudes toward students with highly educated parents, independent of the gender of the student. Teachers did not express differential explicit beliefs regarding the learning and social behaviors of students based on the educational level of the parents, and their expectations concerning the motivation and ambitions or educational chances of these students were neutral. The dissociation between implicit and explicit attitudes may be an indication of the social sensitivity of the relationship between students´ social background and educational achievements and opportunities. Especially implicit attitudes may account for differences in teacher behaviors toward different groups of students and in turn their educational opportunities, and could therefore partly account for consistent findings of educational inequalities based on the social status of families. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 86 (2 UL)
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See detailTeachers´ attitudes towards inclusion: Effects of a training module
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Krischler, Mireille UL

Scientific Conference (2018, September 17)

The success of implementing inclusive practice depends on teachers´ competence as well as their attitudes. Attitudes are defined as psychological tendencies expressed by evaluating a particular entity ... [more ▼]

The success of implementing inclusive practice depends on teachers´ competence as well as their attitudes. Attitudes are defined as psychological tendencies expressed by evaluating a particular entity with some degree of favor or disfavor. Research has provided mixed results concerning teachers´ attitudes toward students with SEN and inclusive practice, whereby teachers generally have more positive attitudes toward the inclusion of students with mild SEN than toward students with complex needs. Training, especially modules focusing on the cognitive processes underlying judgment, can facilitate positive change in attitudes toward inclusion of students with SEN. In a pre–post-test design, data were collected for a sample of 33 experienced primary school teachers attending a course (2x4hr) on inclusion with a focus on the role of attitudes in decision-making and behavior. We assessed general attitudes toward the inclusion of students with SEN as well as teachers´ emotional reactions, stereotypes and behavioural intentions. Results of a repeated measures ANOVA, with time (pre vs. post) and general attitude toward inclusion (4 subscales) as within group factors only showed a main effect for attitudes, reflecting variations between the subscale scores. The training course did not result in changes in general attitudes. Further analyses revealed a positive pre-post course change in teachers´ emotional reactions concerning the inclusion of a student with SEN in their class. Teachers´ stereotype ratings indicated they perceived students with learning difficulties as less competent but warm, whereas students with challenging behavior were perceived as relatively competent but average in warmth. Finally, teachers´ behavioral intentions shifted from focusing on finding solutions within the classroom to more cooperation with colleagues, parents and experts to provide the best support for the student with SEN. In sum, the training course impacted both the affective and conative components of attitudes, whereas general attitudes toward inclusion remained unchanged. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 106 (3 UL)
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See detailTeachers´ judgments and decision making: Studies concerning the transition from primary to secondary education and their implications for teacher education
Krolak-Schwerdt, Sabine UL; Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Hörstermann, Thomas UL

in Zlatkin-Troitschanskaia, Olga; Toepper, M.; Pant, H.A. (Eds.) et al Assessment of Learning Outcomes in Higher Education – Cross-national Comparisons and Perspectives (2018)

Accuracy in assessing academic achievement and potential is a core component of teachers’ diagnostic competence. Large-scale studies in the Luxembourgish and German educational systems show that teachers’ ... [more ▼]

Accuracy in assessing academic achievement and potential is a core component of teachers’ diagnostic competence. Large-scale studies in the Luxembourgish and German educational systems show that teachers’ secondary school track decisions are biased by a student’s social background. Therefore, biased assessment of students may contribute to the social inequalities observed in secondary schools in both countries. Within a social cognitive framework of dual-process theories, bias is explained by heuristic information processing, which, in contrast to information-integrating processing, relies on stereotype-based expectations to form judgments about students. A series of experimental studies investigated the information processing strategies of teachers, identifying a low accountability of the decision setting and a high consistency of student information as key moderators that promote stereotype-based information processing strategies in teachers’ school track decisions. Similar effects were shown for novice teachers at the beginning of their professional career. Further research evaluated intervention modules based on increased accountability, feedback, and increased knowledge about judgment formation processes. Results demonstrated that all evaluated intervention modules led to higher judgment accuracy and more information-integrating processing. Reviewing current models of teachers’ diagnostic competence, the findings on teachers’ information processing emphasized the need to include situational and process-oriented components into models of diagnostic competence. Beside a cognitive component – the ability to form accurate and unbiased judgments – diagnostic competence includes an adaptive choice of information processing strategies, depending on the accountability and information consistency of the judgment setting. Results on intervention modules gave insights how to increase diagnostic competence in teacher education programs. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 198 (17 UL)
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See detailTeaching a language in transformation: Chinese in globalisation
Li, Jinling; Juffermans, Kasper UL; Kroon, Sjaak et al

in NALDIC Quarterly (2012), 10(1), 38-42

Detailed reference viewed: 126 (0 UL)
See detailTeaching about Europe: digital resources and tools
Gabellini, Marco UL; Klein, Francois UL; Mouton, Victoria UL

Speeches/Talks (2016)

The training workshop at the ‘Institut de formation de l'Éducation nationale’, entitled ‘Teaching about Europe: digital resources and tools’, was aimed at teachers in Luxembourg. The workshop particularly ... [more ▼]

The training workshop at the ‘Institut de formation de l'Éducation nationale’, entitled ‘Teaching about Europe: digital resources and tools’, was aimed at teachers in Luxembourg. The workshop particularly focused on the potential of the ‘MyPublications’ tool, available in the Digital Toolbox on cvce.eu. This tool enables teachers to reuse, customise and share the wide range of archive resources and explanatory articles available in the various collections on cvce.eu so that they can use them in a classroom setting by creating their own sequences of documents. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 74 (12 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailTeaching Academic Writing to Austrian University Students: What Linguistics has to offer
Huemer, Birgit UL

Scientific Conference (2007, July 30)

Detailed reference viewed: 47 (0 UL)
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See detailTeaching and Learning Calculus with Free Dynamic Mathematics Software GeoGebra
Hohenwarter, Markus; Hohenwarter, Judith; Kreis, Yves UL et al

Scientific Conference (2008, July 08)

Research suggests that despite the numerous benefits of using technology in mathematics education, the process of embedding technology in classrooms is slow and complex (Cuban, Kirkpatrick, & Peck, 2001 ... [more ▼]

Research suggests that despite the numerous benefits of using technology in mathematics education, the process of embedding technology in classrooms is slow and complex (Cuban, Kirkpatrick, & Peck, 2001). GeoGebra is open-source software for mathematics teaching and learning that offers geometry, algebra and calculus features in a fully connected and easy-to-use software environment. It is available free of charge and used by thousands of students and teachers around the world in classrooms and at home. In this presentation we will both present applications of GeoGebra for calculus teaching at the high school and college level, as well as raise some of the implications of free and easy-to-use software such as GeoGebra for technology integration into the teaching and learning of calculus. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 1302 (3 UL)
See detailTeaching and learning in an internationalized context: challenges and strategies
Deroey, Katrien UL

Presentation (2019, April 26)

The internationalization of higher education has led to a variety of contexts in which native and non-native speakers of English teach students with different cultural, educational and linguistic ... [more ▼]

The internationalization of higher education has led to a variety of contexts in which native and non-native speakers of English teach students with different cultural, educational and linguistic backgrounds through the medium of English. In this talk, I will survey the key issues associated with ‘English Medium Instruction’ for lecturers and students. In addition, we will look at linguistic and pedagogical strategies that can facilitate teaching and learning in these contexts. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 135 (8 UL)