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Peer Reviewed
See detailTeacher-Student Relationship and Its Impact on Students' Desire for Knowledge
Voynova, Ruzhena UL; Weber, Jean-Marie UL

Scientific Conference (2017, February)

Detailed reference viewed: 145 (9 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailTeacher-Student-Relationships and Student Outcomes in Heterogeneous Educational Settings: A Systematic Review of Meta-Analyses
Emslander, Valentin UL; Holzberger, Doris; Fischbach, Antoine UL et al

Scientific Conference (2022, November 09)

Especially in diverse educational settings, positive relationships between students and their teachers can foster students’ learning and help alleviate systematic inequalities. Characterized by emotional ... [more ▼]

Especially in diverse educational settings, positive relationships between students and their teachers can foster students’ learning and help alleviate systematic inequalities. Characterized by emotional warmth or closeness, positive teacher-student relationships (TSR) can improve several student outcomes. For instance, existing meta-analyses suggest significant links between TSR and students’ peer relations, school engagement, academic achievement, emotions, executive functions, general well-being, and reductions in aggressive or disruptive behaviors. However, the evidence on these links is scattered, and a comprehensive overview of the associations with TSR integrating academic, behavioral, socio-emotional, motivational, and general cognitive outcomes is lacking. Furthermore, researchers have been unequivocal about possible moderators, such as how these relationships vary with student age or gender. In light of these research gaps, we systematically reviewed the meta-analytic literature and examined (a) the extent to which academic, behavioral, socio-emotional, motivational, and general cognitive student outcomes are related to TSR in the meta-analytic literature; (b) which moderators influence this association; and (c) the methodological quality of the included meta-analyses. We included meta-analyses with preschool or K-12 samples in our dataset which reported some measure of the relation between TSR and student outcomes. With this dataset, we systematically mapped the evidence on (a) the TSR-outcome relationship; (b) the moderators; and (c) the methodological quality of the meta-analyses. We will present our core findings and discuss future research with this second-order, meta-analytic dataset and the impact of positive TSR in diverse and heterogeneous settings. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 38 (3 UL)
See detailTeachers as agents of change: Teacher agency and emerging models of curriculum.
Priestley, M; Biesta, Gert UL; Robinson, S

in Priestley, M; Biesta, Gert (Eds.) Reinventing the curriculum. New trends in curriculum policy and practice (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 473 (2 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailTeachers make the difference! Gender specific predictors of bullying and cyberbullying
Steffgen, Georges UL; Heinz, Andreas UL

Scientific Conference (2018, April 26)

Detailed reference viewed: 132 (4 UL)
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Peer Reviewed
See detailTeachers misunderstanding of translanguaging in preschools
Aleksic, Gabrijela UL

in OASIS (2022)

Young multilingual children translanguage naturally. They use their linguistic and non-linguistic repertoire to express themselves, but also to make meaning of school environment and learn. When ... [more ▼]

Young multilingual children translanguage naturally. They use their linguistic and non-linguistic repertoire to express themselves, but also to make meaning of school environment and learn. When multilingual children come to a school where they do not understand the language of instruction, they are confronted with learning difficulties, which influences both their school progress and well-being. Translanguaging pedagogy helps teachers to create a space in which multilingual children can make meaning, feel well, and learn. By using this pedagogy, teachers support children’s multilingualism, which they see as a resource, and design inclusive activities accordingly. In this study, 40 Luxembourgian preschool teachers followed a professional development course in translanguaging pedagogy over six months. After the course, the researchers filmed teachers’ translanguaging activities with children. Three foci teachers designed an activity in which they invited three Portuguese and one Serbian child to choose the flag of their countries. However, all four children said that they speak Luxembourgish and thus wanted to choose the Luxembourgish flag. The teachers insisted that the children should choose Portuguese and Serbian flags, explaining that it is not possible for them to speak Luxembourgish. The children were confused and their body language showed their silencing, diminishing and shutting down. This scene showed not only that teachers misunderstood translanguaging, which they saw as multiple languages attached with nation states and flags, but they also, despite their good intentions, showed raciolinguistic ideologies, harmful for children in question. [less ▲]

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See detailTeachers’ assessment competence: Integrating knowledge-, process-, and product-oriented approaches into a competence-oriented conceptual model
Herppich, Stephanie; Praetorius, Anna-Katharina; Förster, Natalie et al

in Teaching and Teacher Education (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 277 (4 UL)
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See detailTeachers’ assessments of students’ achievements: The ecological validity of studies using case vignettes
Krolak-Schwerdt, Sabine UL; Hörstermann, Thomas UL; Glock, Sabine et al

in Journal of Experimental Education (in press)

Detailed reference viewed: 190 (10 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailTeachers’ conceptions of gifted and average-ability students : A latent class approach.
Baudson, Tanja Gabriele UL; Preckel, F.; Schneider, M.

Scientific Conference (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 46 (0 UL)
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See detailTeachers' conceptions of gifted and average-ability students on achievement-relevant dimensions
Baudson, Tanja UL; Preckel, Franzis

in Gifted Child Quarterly (2016), 60

Detailed reference viewed: 115 (2 UL)
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See detailTeachers’ images of the ideal student as a marker for school culture and its role in school alienation during the transition from primary to secondary education in Luxembourg
Grecu, Alyssa Laureen UL; Hascher, Tina; Hadjar, Andreas UL

in Studia Paedagogica (2019), 24(2), 85-108

Particularly in highly stratified educational systems, the transition from primary to secondary school involves a substantial alteration of school culture as students leave their familiar environment of ... [more ▼]

Particularly in highly stratified educational systems, the transition from primary to secondary school involves a substantial alteration of school culture as students leave their familiar environment of primary school and encounter a fundamentally different, initially strange school context. The transition to a new secondary school culture is presumably one cause of students’ increasing school alienation as the students face specific expectations from their secondary teachers. The main aim of this paper is to shed light on the association between the change in school culture represented by the teachers’ image of the ideal student and school alienation in the educational context of Luxembourg. The methodolog y follows a qualitative approach: in-depth interviews and group discussions with teachers from primary and secondary schools were analysed applying a qualitative reconstructive approach. The results confirmed the importance of the transition for students’ educational trajectories and indicated its challenges concerning the changes in demands and values students are expected to meet. Various risk and protective factors concerning the development of school alienation over the course of the transition were identified according to the specific demands of a single school’s cultures. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 156 (9 UL)
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See detailTeachers' Implicit Attitudes Toward Students From Different Social Groups: A Meta-Analysis
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Glock, Sabine UL

in Frontiers in Psychology (2019)

Teachers' attitudes toward their students have been associated with differential teachers' expectations and, in turn, with students' educational pathways. Theories of social cognition can explain the link ... [more ▼]

Teachers' attitudes toward their students have been associated with differential teachers' expectations and, in turn, with students' educational pathways. Theories of social cognition can explain the link between attitudes and behavior. In this regard, the distinction between implicit and explicit attitudes is worth to be considered, whereby implicit attitudes are automatically activated when the attitude object is present and guide automatic behavior. In contrast, explicit attitudes infer deliberation and reflection, hence affecting controlled behavior. As teachers often are required to act immediately in situations that do not allow for thoughtful reflection due to time restraints, teachers' implicit attitudes concerning different student groups with shared characteristics, such as gender or ethnicity, may be especially important when considering teachers' behavior in relation to students' educational pathways. This notion is reflected by an increased interest in adopting implicit methodology in the educational domain. Over the last 10 years, several studies have been conducted in different countries, involving in- and pre-service teachers and investigating their attitudes toward different student groups. Estimates of effects have varied and may be affected by sampling bias. To systematically review and integrate data from different studies, this meta-analysis focuses on teachers' implicit attitudes. Following the systematic search of the database and initial screening, 43 articles were identified from which 22, describing 34 studies, were retained for the meta-analysis after further inspection. First analyses revealed an estimated average effect size of 0.56 for implicit attitudes in favor of non-marginalized groups. As there was a large extent of heterogeneity between studies, several moderator variables were investigated. Results showed that the employed implicit measure and stimulus materials as well as the student target group affected the effect sizes. Low or non-significant relationships were reported between implicit and explicit attitudes. Findings are discussed in terms of theory and future research. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 118 (7 UL)
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See detailTeachers’ implicit personality theories about the gifted: An experimental approach.
Baudson, Tanja Gabriele UL; Preckel, Franzis

in School Psychology Quarterly (2013), 28

Detailed reference viewed: 169 (3 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailTeachers’ implicit theories about gifted children and youth.
Preckel, F.; Baudson, Tanja Gabriele UL

Scientific Conference (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 55 (0 UL)
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See detailTeachers’ information processing and judgement accuracy: effects of information consistency and accountability
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Hörstermann, Thomas UL; Krolak-Schwerdt, Sabine UL et al

in European Journal of Psychology of Education (2020), 35(3), 675-702

Research has shown that teachers are able to adapt their processing strategy of student information to situational demands, whereby they flexibly use either an automatic and category-based strategy or a ... [more ▼]

Research has shown that teachers are able to adapt their processing strategy of student information to situational demands, whereby they flexibly use either an automatic and category-based strategy or a controlled and information-integrating strategy. However, the effect of teachers’ accountability for task and the consistency of student information on strategy use is less clear. In two experimental studies, teachers were presented with consistent and inconsistent student profiles, whereby accountability levels were systematically varied. In the first study, the attention to and memory of information were investigated as indicators of changes in information processing strategy. In the second study, resulting changes in judgement accuracy were investigated. Results of study 1 provided support for the theoretical assumption that people apply the category-based strategy when confronted with consistent information under low accountability conditions, while inconsistent information and high accountability conditions led to the use of information-integration strategy. Results of study 2 showed that teachers’ judgement accuracy generally increased in relation to high accountability conditions and to lesser extent profile consistency, whereby inaccuracy reflected both under- and overestimation of student ability. The combined results suggest that the use of differential information processing strategies not only leads to differences in the attention to and processing of information, but also results in differences in the quality of judgements and decision making, especially under high accountability conditions. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 147 (4 UL)
See detailTeachers’ perception of disrupted instruction: person- and teacher-related correlates and effects on emotions
Zurbriggen, Carmen UL; Venetz, Martin

Scientific Conference (2015, August)

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (0 UL)
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Peer Reviewed
See detailTeachers' perceptions of school drop-out in Luxembourg
Meyers, Raymond UL; Houssemand, Claude UL

in Procedia Social and Behavioral Sciences (2011), 15

Semi-structured interviews were used with teachers in secondary vocational education in Luxembourg to find perceived causes of dropping out. Answers were grouped into four categories: perceived causes ... [more ▼]

Semi-structured interviews were used with teachers in secondary vocational education in Luxembourg to find perceived causes of dropping out. Answers were grouped into four categories: perceived causes related to students, family, peers and school. Problems linked to educational and vocational guidance were highlighted. Specific characteristics of the Luxembourgish educational system (high proportion of immigrants, over-emphasis on foreign language education, lack of coordination between guidance services, insufficient work placement opportunities and school traps) were found to be perceived as related to dropping out. The views expressed provide useful insights and intervention options. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 138 (9 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailTeachers’ perspectives of teaching Greek in a multilingual Greek school in Luxembourg
Kirsch, Claudine UL

Scientific Conference (2018, June 02)

Complementary schools have been said to offer a ‘safe haven’ (Lytra & Martin 2010) for immigrant and ethnic minority children to improve their home language and develop their ethnic and linguistic ... [more ▼]

Complementary schools have been said to offer a ‘safe haven’ (Lytra & Martin 2010) for immigrant and ethnic minority children to improve their home language and develop their ethnic and linguistic identity. While many scholars have emphasized the monolingual ideologies at play in these schools, students and teachers have nevertheless been reported to behave in a multilingual manner (Blackledge & Creese 2010, Li Wei 2014, Lytra 2011). This was true to a lesser extent in a Greek school in Luxembourg where the staff shared monolingual ideologies and tried to reinforce a sense of ‘Greekness’ by emphasizing the cultural prestige of ancient Greek (Tsagkogeorga 2016). Given the arrival of more Greek families to Luxembourg, one wonders to what extent the teachers will reconceptualise their pedagogical practices. The present study draws on interviews with two Greek teachers carried out in January 2017 and 2018. One of the teachers migrated in 2016 to Luxembourg. The interviews focussed on pedagogical practices and changes thereof owing to the arrival of children of newly migrated families who had better linguistic skills than and a different understanding of Greek culture from children of established families. First findings have shown that both teachers spoke positively about multilingualism. They were aware of the children’s differing linguistic, social and educational experiences and explained the challenges this caused for teaching. Nevertheless, they seemed to ignore the children’s repertoires by emphasising the teaching of Greek and offering little spaces to other languages (Kirsch forthcoming). The space attributed to culture differed between the teachers. More data will be collected and analysed thematically. The findings of this paper encourage teachers to reflect on their language policies and teaching approaches, and encourage them to capitalize on their students’ heterogeneity. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 95 (3 UL)