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See detailTreg induction by a rationally selected mixture of Clostridia strains from the human microbiota
Atarshi, Koji; Tanoue, Takeshi; Oshima, Kenshiro et al

in Nature (2013), 500

Manipulation of the gut microbiota holds great promise for the treatment of inflammatory and allergic diseases1, 2. Although numerous probiotic microorganisms have been identified3, there remains a ... [more ▼]

Manipulation of the gut microbiota holds great promise for the treatment of inflammatory and allergic diseases1, 2. Although numerous probiotic microorganisms have been identified3, there remains a compelling need to discover organisms that elicit more robust therapeutic responses, are compatible with the host, and can affect a specific arm of the host immune system in a well-controlled, physiological manner. Here we use a rational approach to isolate CD4+FOXP3+ regulatory T (Treg)-cell-inducing bacterial strains from the human indigenous microbiota. Starting with a healthy human faecal sample, a sequence of selection steps was applied to obtain mice colonized with human microbiota enriched in Treg-cell-inducing species. From these mice, we isolated and selected 17 strains of bacteria on the basis of their high potency in enhancing Treg cell abundance and inducing important anti-inflammatory molecules—including interleukin-10 (IL-) and inducible T-cell co-stimulator (ICOS)—in Treg cells upon inoculation into germ-free mice. Genome sequencing revealed that the 17 strains fall within clusters IV, XIVa and XVIII of Clostridia, which lack prominent toxins and virulence factors. The 17 strains act as a community to provide bacterial antigens and a TGF-β-rich environment to help expansion and differentiation of Treg cells. Oral administration of the combination of 17 strains to adult mice attenuated disease in models of colitis and allergic diarrhoea. Use of the isolated strains may allow for tailored therapeutic manipulation of human immune disorders. [less ▲]

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See detailA Trellis-Based SAT Problem
Franck, Christian UL

Poster (2018, April)

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See detailTREM2 R47H variant and risk of essential tremor: a cross-sectional international multicenter study
Ortega-Cubero, S.; Lorenzo-Betancor, O.; Lorenzo, E. et al

in Parkinsonism and Related Disorders (2015), 21(3), 306-309

INTRODUCTION: Essential tremor (ET) is the most frequent movement disorder in adults. Its pathophysiology is not clearly understood, however there is growing evidence showing common etiologic factors with ... [more ▼]

INTRODUCTION: Essential tremor (ET) is the most frequent movement disorder in adults. Its pathophysiology is not clearly understood, however there is growing evidence showing common etiologic factors with other neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases (AD, PD). Recently, a rare p.R47H substitution (rs75932628) in the TREM2 protein (triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2; OMIM: *605086) has been proposed as a risk factor for AD, PD and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The objective of the study was to determine whether TREM2 p.R47H allele is also a risk factor for developing ET. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional multicenter international study. An initial case-control cohort from Spain (n = 456 ET, n = 2715 controls) was genotyped. In a replication phase, a case-control series (n = 897 ET, n = 1449 controls) from different populations (Italy, Germany, North-America and Taiwan) was studied. Owed to the rarity of the variant, published results on p.R47H allele frequency from 14777 healthy controls from European, North American or Chinese descent were additionally considered. The main outcome measure was p.R47H (rs75932628) allelic frequency. RESULTS: There was a significant association between TREM2 p.R47H variant and ET in the Spanish cohort (odds ratio [OR], 5.97; 95% CI, 1.203-29.626; p = 0.042), but it was not replicated in other populations. CONCLUSIONS: These results argue in favor of population-specific differences in the allelic distribution and suggest that p.R47H (rs75932628) variant may contribute to the susceptibility of ET in Spanish population. However, taking into account the very low frequency of p.R47H, further confirmatory analyses of larger ET series are needed. [less ▲]

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See detailTREM2 triggers microglial density and age‐related neuronal loss
Linnartz-Gerlach, Bettina; Bodea, Liviu-Gabriel; Klaus, Christine et al

in Glia (2018)

The microglial triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 (TREM2) signals via the activatory membrane adaptor molecule TYROBP. Genetic variants or mutations of TREM2 or TYROBP have been linked to ... [more ▼]

The microglial triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 (TREM2) signals via the activatory membrane adaptor molecule TYROBP. Genetic variants or mutations of TREM2 or TYROBP have been linked to inflammatory neurodegenerative diseases associated with aging. The typical aging process goes along with microglial changes and mild neuronal loss, but the exact contribution of TREM2 is still unclear. Aged TREM2 knock‐out mice showed decreased age‐related neuronal loss in the substantia nigra and the hippocampus. Transcriptomic analysis of the brains of 24 months old TREM2 knock‐out mice revealed 211 differentially expressed genes mostly downregulated and associated with complement activation and oxidative stress response pathways. Consistently, 24 months old TREM2 knock‐out mice showed lower transcription of microglial (Aif1 and Tmem119), oxidative stress markers (Inos, Cyba, and Cybb) and complement components (C1qa, C1qb, C1qc, C3, C4b, Itgam, and Itgb2), decreased microglial numbers and expression of the microglial activation marker Cd68, as well as accumulation of oxidized lipids. Cultured microglia of TREM2 knock‐out mice showed reduced phagocytosis and oxidative burst. Thus, microglial TREM2 contributes to age‐related microglial changes, phagocytic oxidative burst, and loss of neurons with possible detrimental effects during physiological aging. [less ▲]

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See detailtrend Analysis and interpretation of Luxembourg’s consumption Footprint NFA 2010 edition, data years 2000 – 2007
Hild, Paula UL; Takagi, Aya; Schmitt, Bianca

Report (2012)

The Ecological Footprint methodology by Global Footprint Network measures human consumption of products and services from different ecosystems in terms of the amount of bioproductive land and sea area ... [more ▼]

The Ecological Footprint methodology by Global Footprint Network measures human consumption of products and services from different ecosystems in terms of the amount of bioproductive land and sea area needed to supply these products and services. In other words, the Ecological Footprint calculates the land area needed to produce food, provide resources, produce energy, and absorb the CO2 emissions generated by the supply chains within one year at country level. For the calculations of Luxembourg’s Ecological Footprint, international statistical databases are used to identify the quantities of produced, imported and exported goods and services. Then, Global Footprint Network applies different factors to the quantities to assess the area needed to supply these products and services. Finally, the Consumption Footprint of a nation is divided by the number of inhabitants and compared to other countries at a per capita level (global hectares per capita). This means that the Ecological Footprint can be used as an indicator for the sustainability of a national consumption by assessing human land uses. In the following paragraph, Luxembourg’s Ecological Footprint is discussed in the framework of the environmental indicators of Luxembourg’s competitiveness scoreboard (see Table 9) [MECE, 2010]. Luxembourg’s ranking is rather low for all of the scoreboard indicators: number of ISO 9001 certifications per billion of inhabitants (21 out of 27); number of ISO 14001 certifications per billion of inhabitants (15 out of 27); total greenhouse gas emissions (15 out of 27); renewable energy ration (23 out of 27); quantity of municipal waste per capita per year (24 out of 27); energetic intensity (8 out of 27); transport by car (17 out of 27); Ecological Footprint in gha per capita per year (27 out of 27). Based on the environmental competiveness scoreboard indicators, it can be concluded that in general, Luxembourg’s environmental performance is low compared to the other countries of the European Union. With respect to Luxembourg’s Ecological Footprint, it can be said that Luxembourg’s consumption is not sustainable. The number of planets that would be needed if the world's population lived like the population of Luxembourg in 2007 is about six. However, per year, the biocapacity (bioproductive land) of the planet can only regenerate once. [less ▲]

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See detailTrend-Aware Proactive Caching via Tensor Train Decomposition: A Bayesian Viewpoint
Mehrizi Rahmat Abadi, Sajad UL; X. Vu, Thang; Chatzinotas, Symeon UL et al

in IEEE Open Journal of the Communications Society (2021), (4369),

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See detailTrend-Aware Proactive Caching via Tensor Train Decomposition: A Bayesian Viewpoint
Mehrizi Rahmat Abadi, Sajad UL; X. Vu, Thang; Chatzinotas, Symeon UL et al

in IEEE Open Journal of the Communications Society (2021), (4369),

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See detailTrend-Aware Proactive Caching via Tensor Train Decomposition: A Bayesian Viewpoint
Mehrizi Rahmat Abadi, Sajad UL; X. Vu, Thang; Chatzinotas, Symeon UL et al

in IEEE Open Journal of the Communications Society (2021), (4369),

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See detailTrend-Aware Proactive Caching via Tensor Train Decomposition: A Bayesian Viewpoint
Mehrizi Rahmat Abadi, Sajad UL; X. Vu, Thang; Chatzinotas, Symeon UL et al

in IEEE Open Journal of the Communications Society (2021), (4369),

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See detailTrend-Aware Proactive Caching via Tensor Train Decomposition: A Bayesian Viewpoint
Mehrizi Rahmat Abadi, Sajad UL; X. Vu, Thang; Chatzinotas, Symeon UL et al

in IEEE Open Journal of the Communications Society (2021), (4369),

Detailed reference viewed: 81 (11 UL)
See detailTrends and Challenges in Combating Illicit Trade in Tobacco Products in the U.S.
Tosza, Stanislaw UL; Kajić, Matija

in Tosza, Stanislaw; Vervaele, John A. E. (Eds.) Combatting Illicit Trade in Tobacco Products (2022)

Most of the illicit tobacco trade (ITT) in the USA is caused by high tax rates on cigarettes in many states and localities and the availability of much cheaper cigarettes from low tax states and other low ... [more ▼]

Most of the illicit tobacco trade (ITT) in the USA is caused by high tax rates on cigarettes in many states and localities and the availability of much cheaper cigarettes from low tax states and other low-tax jurisdictions, such as Tribal lands or Internet sales from domestic sellers or international sellers (who can evade all U.S. federal, state, local cigarette taxes). This chapter aims to give an account of how the U.S. deals with this and other problems of illicit tobacco trade, including both its successes and its shortcomings. The chapter gives an account of necessary aspects of regulation, and explains the enforcement side, including policy, applicable law, and agency involvement. Particular attention is paid to central challenges of U.S. efforts to fight the ITT, including prioritisation of ITT in comparison to other criminal activities, data on ITT related criminal activity, track and trace systems, and coordination among responsible agencies and levels of government. [less ▲]

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See detailTrends and Players in tax policy: Greece
Pantazatou, Aikaterini UL

Presentation (2013, July)

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See detailTrends and Players in Tax Policy: Greece
Pantazatou, Aikaterini UL

in M. Lang et al. (Ed.) Trends and Players in Tax Policy (2016)

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See detailTrends and transitions
Vögele, Claus UL

in European Journal of Health Psychology (2018), 25(1), 1

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See detailTrends from 2006-2018 in Health, Health Behaviour, Health Outcomes and Social Context of Adolescents in Luxembourg
Heinz, Andreas UL; van Duin, Claire UL; Kern, Matthias Robert UL et al

Report (2020)

This report shows how 30 health indicators developed in the four Luxembourg HBSC surveys conducted in 2006, 2010, 2014 and 2018. There were positive trends especially in the health behaviour of the pupils ... [more ▼]

This report shows how 30 health indicators developed in the four Luxembourg HBSC surveys conducted in 2006, 2010, 2014 and 2018. There were positive trends especially in the health behaviour of the pupils: they smoke less and drink less alcohol. They also report more frequently that they brush their teeth regularly, eat more fruit and fewer sweets and consume fewer soft drinks. From 2006-2018, however, there were also deteriorations. For example, more pupils feel stressed from school and rate the climate among classmates worse. In addition, there are more pupils who are overweight and exercise less and more pupils report having psychosomatic health complaints. [less ▲]

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See detailTrends in cannabis consumption among youth in Luxembourg
Catunda, Carolina UL; van Duin, Claire UL; Heinz, Andreas UL et al

Scientific Conference (2019, September)

Background: Cannabis is the most widely consumed illegal drug worldwide. Among adolescents, cannabis use is a risk factor for cognitive decline, mental illness, social problems, and the use of other ... [more ▼]

Background: Cannabis is the most widely consumed illegal drug worldwide. Among adolescents, cannabis use is a risk factor for cognitive decline, mental illness, social problems, and the use of other psychoactive drugs. The current study presents trends in cannabis consumption among adolescents in Luxembourg. Methods: The Health Behaviour in School Aged Children (HBSC) Study in Luxembourg collected data in 2006, 2010, 2014 and 2018 using a standardized paper-pencil questionnaire. In total, 23,346 secondary schools students aged 11 to 18 years old (M=15.51, SD=1.53) responded to questions on cannabis, tobacco and alcohol consumption (lifetime and the past 30 days). Findings: In general, students who never used cannabis significantly increased over the four HBSC study waves (78%, 81.2%, 81%, 84%), whereas trends are similar for boys (74.5%, 77%, 78.2%, 81.4%), but not for girls (81.5%, 85%, 83.2%, 86.3%). Cannabis use (past 30 days) significantly differ for girls (94.1%, 94.1%, 92.8%, 93.7%), but not in general (91.7%, 92%, 90.9%, 91.7%), neither for boys (89.3%, 90.1%, 88.6%, 89.6%). Discussion: Cannabis lifetime use remains high for both genders. While consumption in the last 30 days remained stable for boys, it increased for girls over the past years. Tailored preventive interventions, based on health psychological models, are essential to educate adolescents about the social-cognitive risks of cannabis use and strengthen their capacities and resilience to resist experimental drug use and social pressure. In a context where legalization policies are discussed in various European countries, e-health approaches, for example, could be widely implemented in a cost-effective manner. [less ▲]

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See detailTrends in childhood type 1 diabetes incidence in Europe during 1989-2008: evidence of non-uniformity over time in rates of increase
Patterson, C.C.; Gyürüs, E.; Rosenbauer, J. et al

in Diabetologia (2012), 55(8), 2142-2147

Aims/hypothesis The aim of the study was to describe 20- year incidence trends for childhood type 1 diabetes in 23 EURODIAB centres and compare rates of increase in the first (1989–1998) and second ... [more ▼]

Aims/hypothesis The aim of the study was to describe 20- year incidence trends for childhood type 1 diabetes in 23 EURODIAB centres and compare rates of increase in the first (1989–1998) and second (1999–2008) halves of the period. Methods All registers operate in geographically defined regions and are based on a clinical diagnosis. Completeness of registration is assessed by capture–recapture methodology. Twenty-three centres in 19 countries registered 49,969 new cases of type 1 diabetes in individuals diagnosed before their 15th birthday during the period studied. Results Ascertainment exceeded 90% in most registers. During the 20-year period, all but one register showed statistically significant changes in incidence, with rates universally increasing. When estimated separately for the first and second halves of the period, the median rates of increase were similar: 3.4% per annum and 3.3% per annum, respectively. However, rates of increase differed significantly between the first half and the second half for nine of the 21 registers with adequate coverage of both periods; five registers showed significantly higher rates of increase in the first half, and four significantly higher rates in the second half. Conclusions/interpretation The incidence rate of childhood type 1 diabetes continues to rise across Europe by an average of approximately 3–4% per annum, but the increase is not necessarily uniform, showing periods of less rapid and more rapid increase in incidence in some registers. This pattern of change suggests that important risk exposures differ over time in different European countries. Further time trend analysis and comparison of the patterns in defined regions is warranted. [less ▲]

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See detailTrends in Model-based GUI Testing
Arlt, Stephan UL; Bertolini, Cristiano; Pahl, Simon et al

in Advances in Computers (2012), 86

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See detailTrends in Rainfall and Economic Growth In Africa: A Neglected Cause of the African Growth Tragedy
Barrios, Salvador; Bertinelli, Luisito UL; Strobl, Eric

in Review of Economics and Statistics (2010), 92(2), 350-366

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See detailTrends in service delivery: Psychological practice in rehabilitation settings
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Padrone, Frank; Feinblatt, Arlene et al

in Rehabilitation Outllook (1997)

Detailed reference viewed: 86 (2 UL)