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See detailWorking memory, phonological awareness, and developing language skills
Engel de Abreu, Pascale UL; Gathercole, S

Poster (2008, July)

The relationship between working memory, verbal short-term memory, phonological awareness, and developing language skills was explored longitudinally in children growing up in a multilingual society. A ... [more ▼]

The relationship between working memory, verbal short-term memory, phonological awareness, and developing language skills was explored longitudinally in children growing up in a multilingual society. A sample of 121 children from Luxembourg were followed from the end of Kindergarten to 1st Grade, and completed multiple assessments of verbal short-term memory, complex working memory, phonological awareness, native and foreign vocabulary knowledge, language comprehension, and reading. Results indicate that relations between the measures were best characterized by a model consisting of two related but separable constructs – corresponding to verbal short-term memory and the central executive – that were distinct from phonological awareness. The data further showed that assessments of verbal short-term memory in Kindergarten significantly predicted vocabulary knowledge and comprehension in native and foreign languages one year later: Central executive and verbal short-term memory measures in Kindergarten were significantly associated with reading in 1st Grade and phonological awareness, indexed by rhyme detection, did not predict any of the language constructs one year later. The findings lend strong support to the position that verbal short-term memory is one of the main contributors to new word learning in both native and non-native languages by supporting the formation of stable phonological representations of new words in long-term memory. Verbal short-term memory also seems to play a significant role in the syntactic comprehension of sentences. The heard material might be kept active in verbal short-term memory while the child is listening to the sentence and processing it for comprehension. Finally working memory appears to make significant contributions to reading development. One explanation of these findings is that literacy classroom activities often impose heavy demands on working memory, the capacity of which therefore has a direct effect on the frequency of task failure or success in these classroom activities which consequently influences the rate of learning. [less ▲]

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See detailWorking memory, phonological awareness, and language learning
Engel de Abreu, Pascale UL; Gathercole, S. E.

Scientific Conference (2007, August)

This study investigated the relationship between working memory, phonological processing and developing language skills in a population of children growing up in a multilingual context involving the three ... [more ▼]

This study investigated the relationship between working memory, phonological processing and developing language skills in a population of children growing up in a multilingual context involving the three languages of Luxembourgish, German, and French. A sample of 122 children from Luxembourg, aged between 5 and 7 years, participated in the study, and completed assessments of phonological short-term memory, complex working memory, phonological awareness, native and foreign vocabulary knowledge, language comprehension and reading. The data were best characterized by a measurement model in which working memory consists of two related yet distinct components – corresponding to phonological short-term memory and a central executive – that were distinct from phonological awareness. Language abilities in both the native and foreign languages were more strongly associated with phonological short-term memory than other constructs in the model. The findings lend strong support to the proposal that vocabulary learning in particular is mediated in part at least by the phonological loop component of working memory. [less ▲]

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See detailWorking time an flexibility in Luxembourg
Deprez, Christian UL

in IUSLabor (2016), 2/2015(2), 44-53

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See detailWorking Time Mismatches and Self-Assessed Health of Married Couples: Evidence from Germany
Lepinteur, Anthony UL

in Social Science and Medicine (2019)

Underemployment and overemployment are widespread in developed countries and have detrimental consequences on health. This article tackles the question of the relationship between health and own, spousal ... [more ▼]

Underemployment and overemployment are widespread in developed countries and have detrimental consequences on health. This article tackles the question of the relationship between health and own, spousal and cross working time mismatches in bi-active couples. Using 83,000 observations from the German SOEP (1997–2012) I demonstrate that self-assessed health is reduced in case of overemployment and underemployment. I find that living with an overemployed partner is negatively correlated with own health. However, I show that the effect of overemployment is lower for those who live with an overemployed partner. This positive cross-effect is consistent with the existence of a comparison norm effect within household. Those results are robust to a battery of sensitivity checks and mostly transit via mental health. This article concludes that overemployment does not only affect the overemployed workers but also their partner and not accounting for such spillovers leads to an underestimation of the total health costs of overemployment. [less ▲]

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See detailWorking toward equitable research practices: the value of highlighting complexity and respecting context
Siry, Christina UL; Wilmes, Sara UL

in Cultural Studies of Science Education (2020)

In this response paper, we reflect upon the contributions of Gallard Martínez, Pitts, Brkich, and Ramos de Robles (this issue) in their manuscript “How does one recognize contextual mitigating factors ... [more ▼]

In this response paper, we reflect upon the contributions of Gallard Martínez, Pitts, Brkich, and Ramos de Robles (this issue) in their manuscript “How does one recognize contextual mitigating factors (CMFs) as a basis to understand and arrive at better approaches to research designs” and elaborate the ways in which we work toward highlighting the contextual complexities within our own research. Our research focuses on working toward equitable practices for culturally and linguistically diverse children in science education, in order to draw on the many cultural and communicative resources they bring to primary school science investigations. We draw upon our previous and current research projects in this forum contribution to tease-apart CMFs related to issues of equity in teaching science with culturally and linguistically diverse primary school children in our national context in Luxembourg. We conclude with a consideration of how the process of unpacking a diverse array of CMFs relative to our work with students helps us select and employ theoretical lenses and research methodologies that position us to gather rich understandings of the complexities within our research contexts and in our work with children and teachers [less ▲]

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See detailWorking towards an international consensus on criteria for assessing internet gaming disorder: a critical commentary on Petry et al. (2014).
Griffiths, Mark D.; van Rooij, Antonius J.; Kardefelt-Winther, Daniel et al

in Addiction (Abingdon, England) (2016), 111(1), 167-75

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See detailWorking with Deep Generative Models and Tabular Data Imputation
Camino, Ramiro Daniel UL; Hammerschmidt, Christian UL; State, Radu UL

Scientific Conference (2020, July 17)

Datasets with missing values are very common in industry applications. Missing data typically have a negative impact on machine learning models. With the rise of generative models in deep learning, recent ... [more ▼]

Datasets with missing values are very common in industry applications. Missing data typically have a negative impact on machine learning models. With the rise of generative models in deep learning, recent studies proposed solutions to the problem of imputing missing values based various deep generative models. Previous experiments with Generative Adversarial Networks (GANs) and Variational Autoencoders (VAEs) showed promising results in this domain. Initially, these results focused on imputation in image data, e.g. filling missing patches in images. Recent proposals addressed missing values in tabular data. For these data, the case for deep generative models seems to be less clear. In the process of providing a fair comparison of proposed methods, we uncover several issues when assessing the status quo: the use of under-specified and ambiguous dataset names, the large range of parameters and hyper-parameters to tune for each method, and the use of different metrics and evaluation methods. [less ▲]

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See detail“Working with” as a methodological stance: Collaborating with students in teaching, writing, and research
Siry, Christina UL; Zawatski, Elizabeth

in International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education : QSE (2011), 24(3), 343-361

Using critical ethnography guided by cultural sociology, this manuscript examines the role of “co” in teacher education; coresearching, coteaching, and cogenerating dialogue. The authors are a pre-service ... [more ▼]

Using critical ethnography guided by cultural sociology, this manuscript examines the role of “co” in teacher education; coresearching, coteaching, and cogenerating dialogue. The authors are a pre-service teacher and college instructor, and through our multiple perspectives and positionings we explore how collaboration served to dismantle teacher-student hierarchies and replaced them with complex relationships mediated by polysemic approaches to research. Pushing against traditional ideologies, we utilize a multi-voiced approach to writing as we present our experiences and interpretations of data relative to the possibilities of collaboration in education and research. As we analyze our role in collaborative endeavors, we ask: How can we find ways to work across and around hierarchical institutional structures when working with our students? What are ways that we can examine our individual lived experiences together, and is it possible to work with each other to develop identities as teachers that are not predicated on power differentials? [less ▲]

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See detailThe Workings of Scientific Communities
Cowan, Robin; Jonard, Nicolas UL

Report (2001)

No abstract is available for this item.

Detailed reference viewed: 82 (0 UL)
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See detailWorkplace attachment and meaning of work in a French secondary school.
Rioux, Liliane; Pignault, Anne UL

in Spanish Journal of Psychology (The) (2013), 16

This research aims to gain a better understanding of the attachment of teachers to their workplace by identifying the areas to which they become attached and which give meaning to their work. Based on the ... [more ▼]

This research aims to gain a better understanding of the attachment of teachers to their workplace by identifying the areas to which they become attached and which give meaning to their work. Based on the belief that place attachment is an affective bond between a person and his or her environment (Bonnes & Secchiaroli, 1995), its aim is to identify the attachment of secondary school teachers to their workplace, which is viewed as a whole but also as a combination of specific places, and to show that the places that predict overall workplace attachment are also those that give meaning to work. A Workplace Attachment Scale was completed by 158 teachers in a secondary school in the Paris region (France). This questionnaire contained items evaluating attachment to each specific place of work and others adapted from the meaning-of-work scale evaluating the meaning given to each of these places. The results show that all the teachers were more closely attached to places that provide opportunities for informal communication than to those directly related to teaching. The main workplace attachment predictors also concern places constituting the essence of the profession and/or places where teachers can manage their organizational stress. [less ▲]

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See detailWorkplace attachment, workspace appropriation, and job satisfaction
Rioux, Liliane; Pignault, Anne UL

in Psyecology (2013), 4(1), 39-65

The aim of this paper is to clarify the relationship between psycho-environmental variables and work satisfaction by comparing them in a single model of psycho-organizational variables whose impact on ... [more ▼]

The aim of this paper is to clarify the relationship between psycho-environmental variables and work satisfaction by comparing them in a single model of psycho-organizational variables whose impact on satisfaction at work is well known. One hundred and twelve French supermarket workers completed a questionnaire composed of indicators assessing: (a) job satisfaction (ESVP and M.S.Q), (b) psycho-environmental variables (EALT, A-E scale, and a questionnaire about workspace appropriation and workplace attachment), and (c) psycho-organizational variables using some of Karasec’s control scales, Geurts’ SWING, and Meyer, Allen, and Smith’s organizational commitment scale. Regression analysis showed that the psycho-environmental variables were predictors of job satisfaction, some being more relevant predictors of the MSQ and particularly of the ESVP than the psycho-organizational variables. These results contribute to the current debate on the operationalization of the concept of job satisfaction. [less ▲]

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See detailWorkplace bullying exposure and subjective well-being – The mediating role of the frustration of the need for relatedness. A longitudinal six-wave study
Sischka, Philipp UL; Steffgen, Georges UL

Scientific Conference (2019, November 08)

Workplace bullying is a serious phenomenon that has serious detrimental effects on victim’s health, attitudes, and work-related behavior. Drawing on self-determination theory, we propose that bullying ... [more ▼]

Workplace bullying is a serious phenomenon that has serious detrimental effects on victim’s health, attitudes, and work-related behavior. Drawing on self-determination theory, we propose that bullying exposure thwarts employee’s need for relatedness with the result of decreased well-being. Studies examining these mechanisms used either a cross-sectional design (Trépanier et al., 2013) or a longitudinal design with (not theoretically justified) long time intervals (i.e., 12-month time lag; Trépanier et al., 2015). Therefore, the aim of our study was to test this mediation in a longitudinal design with much shorter time intervals (i.e. monthly), whether to see if the bullying exposure also shows short-term effects on well-being. A six-wave online survey design with monthly time lag was employed and data were collected among U.S. employees. The sample consists of 1,595 respondents (55.8% females, n=890, ageM = 36.9, ageSD =10.3). Workplace bullying exposure was assessed with the S-NAQ (Notelaers et al., 2018), frustration of the need for relatedness with the Psychological Needs Thwarting Scale (Bartholomew et al., 2011) and well-being with the WHO-5 well-being-index (Topp et al., 2015). Cross-lagged mediation analysis within a structural equation modeling framework confirmed the mediation model: Bullying exposure was significantly related to a change in frustration of relatedness and frustration of relatedness was significantly related to a change in well-being across all waves. The study findings advance the field through showing that bullying exposure has not only a long-term effect on well-being but also a short one, and that this effect is mediated through the frustration of relatedness. [less ▲]

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See detailWorkplace bullying: Validation of a measurement and the role of competition, passive avoidant leadership style, psychological contract violation and basic need frustration.
Sischka, Philipp UL

Doctoral thesis (2018)

Workplace bullying, mobbing or harassment describe a situation where an employee is the target of systematic mistreatment by other organizational members (i.e., colleagues, supervisors, subordinates) that ... [more ▼]

Workplace bullying, mobbing or harassment describe a situation where an employee is the target of systematic mistreatment by other organizational members (i.e., colleagues, supervisors, subordinates) that may cause severe social, psychological and psychosomatic problems in the targeted employee. Since the appearance of the book “The harassed worker” by Brodsky (1976) and initial studies by Heinz Leymann (1986, 1990), workplace bullying research has developed into a huge and still massively growing research area that is conducted all over the globe. Especially, when related concepts are considered, a vast amount of studies have researched prevalence, risk factors, consequences, and, very recently, psychological mechanisms of workplace bullying exposure. A literature review revealed that existing workplace bullying exposure self-report inventories exhibit some weaknesses. Therefore, the first study (Chapter 2) aimed to develop a new short scale, the Luxembourg Workplace Mobbing Scale (LWMS) in three different language versions (i.e., Luxembourgish, French, German). Furthermore, it investigated the psychometric properties and the validity of this scale and examined if the three language versions exhibit measurement invariance. The LWMS revealed good psychometric properties in terms of its internal consistency and its factor structure. Furthermore, metric and partial scalar invariance across the three language versions could be established. Initial validation tests revealed high criterion validity of the LWMS. In line with recent workplace bullying exposure research, the LWMS was meaningfully linked with other working factors and measures of psychological health. The second study (Chapter 3) aimed to test the LWMS’s factor structure and measurement invariance across possible risk groups of bullying exposure (i.e., gender, age, and occupational groups). Moreover, based on recent theories and findings on workplace bullying the study aimed to further elucidate the LWMS’s nomological net with relevant psychological (i.e., psychological well-being, work engagement, sleeping hours, suicidal thoughts) and physiological health measures (i.e., physiological health problems, alcohol and smoking consumption, body mass index) as well as with important organizational criteria (i.e., work performance, turnover intention, absenteeism) and with self-labeling victim status. Evaluation of different measurement invariance models confirm metric and (partial) scalar invariance across all compared groups. Neither age, gender, nor the most frequent areas of occupation in Luxembourg represent important risk factors for workplace bullying exposure. Regarding criterion validity, with the exceptions of alcohol and smoking consumption, all proposed psychological and physiological health measures as well as organizational criteria are meaningfully associated with the LWMS. In summary, the LWMS is especially useful, when the identification of workplace bullying exposure risk groups or cross-cultural research is of concern. The third study (Chapter 4) aimed to test specific organizational risk factors of the occurrence of workplace bullying. Specifically, competition and passive avoidant leadership style were tested as risk factors of workplace bullying (exposure and perpetration) assessed with two assessment methods (behavioral experience and self-labeling method). Consistent with theoretical reasoning and prior research, results demonstrated that competition as well as passive avoidant leadership style are important risk factors of workplace bullying exposure. Moreover, results showed that the same effects showed up for perpetration. Even more interesting, passive avoidant leadership style acted as a moderator on the effect of competition on workplace bullying exposure. In line with theory, competition is stronger related to workplace bullying exposure, when passive avoidant leadership is high. Thus, passive avoidant leadership style can be considered a disruptive factor reinforcing the negative association with competition. Regarding workplace bullying perpetration the same moderation effect was only found for the self-labeled assessment method. The fourth study (Chapter 5) aimed to identify different psychological mechanisms (i.e., psychological contract violation and frustration of basic needs) that link being target of workplace bullying and health, attitudinal and behavioral outcomes. Furthermore, their relative impact and importance on different outcomes were highlighted. Psychological contract violation was an important mediator for decreased job satisfaction and higher turnover intentions, whereas frustration of autonomy mediated the effect between workplace bullying exposure and increased levels of burnout, frustration of competence mediated the effect of bullying exposure on decreased work performance and frustration of relatedness was strongly associated with decreased well-being and vigor. Results showed that feelings of psychological contract violation and frustration of basic needs accounted for unique variation in many outcome variables, pointing to the individual contribution of both psychological mechanisms. The present thesis deepens our understanding of the organizational circumstances under which workplace bullying is more likely and the psychological mechanisms that link the bullying exposure with several outcomes. These results can guide possible prevention and intervention strategies. [less ▲]

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See detailWorkplace mobbing in Luxembourg: Predictors, prevalence and changes
Sischka, Philipp UL; Steffgen, Georges UL

Scientific Conference (2015, November 21)

(1) Research has shown that a poor psychosocial working environment can trigger workplace mobbing, which is a serious phenomenon that is costly to organizations and has various negative consequences of ... [more ▼]

(1) Research has shown that a poor psychosocial working environment can trigger workplace mobbing, which is a serious phenomenon that is costly to organizations and has various negative consequences of those targeted. (2) The present study describes psychosocial workplace predictors, prevalence and changes of workplace mobbing in Luxembourg for the last three years. (3) For measuring mobbing behavior, we use the Luxembourg Workplace Mobbing Scale (LWMS), a new short scale of workplace mobbing experience that was tested and validated in three different language versions (German, French and Luxembourgish). We use the first, second and third wave (planed for August 2015) of the Quality-of-Work-Index Luxembourg (Steffgen & Kohl 2013; Sischka & Steffgen 2015). Each wave is a representative sample of about 1530 employees working in Luxembourg (Data collection by Computer-assisted Telephone Interviewing). (4) Results of correlation and regression analysis with data of the first and second wave support the ‘psychosocial working environment’-hypothesis: Mobbing victims evaluate their psychosocial working environment worse (in terms of satisfaction, meaningfulness of work, respect of the superior and the whole organization, communication and feedback, cooperation among colleagues, mental strain) than persons that are not affected by mobbing. In addition, mobbing victims are more likely to report a higher stress level, symptoms of a burnout and addictive behavior, compared to non-victims. Finally, changes of mobbing exposure over the three measurement points will be discussed. (5) Focus of interventions for mobbing should be on improving the general quality of work and the collective working environment. [less ▲]

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See detailWorkplace Relocation and Mobility Changes in a Transnational Metropolitan Area: The Case of the University of Luxembourg
Sprumont, François UL; Viti, Francesco UL; Caruso, Geoffrey UL et al

in Transportation Research Procedia (2014, December), 4

The aim of this paper is to study the utility variation related to the commuting mobility of University staff members due to their future workplace relocation. During the year 2012, a travel survey was ... [more ▼]

The aim of this paper is to study the utility variation related to the commuting mobility of University staff members due to their future workplace relocation. During the year 2012, a travel survey was completed by a total of 397 staff members, representing 36.4% of the university employees, who filled in a questionnaire which revealed complex decision making patterns due to the special traveling scenario involving four countries at once. A Multinomial Logit model has been used to anticipate the impact of university relocation from the capital city to a developing area in the south of the country which will happen between 2015 and 2018 and that will affect most of the employees. The effects of several Travel Demand Management measures are discussed based on the analysis of alternative scenarios [less ▲]

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See detailWorkshop 'Strategies for Using Digital Sources in the Classroom
Randolph, John; Zaagsma, Gerben UL

Presentation (2018, October 26)

Given the current abundance of available digital resources for historians (retro-digitized as well as born-digital materials), there is an urgent question of how to engage with these resources in the ... [more ▼]

Given the current abundance of available digital resources for historians (retro-digitized as well as born-digital materials), there is an urgent question of how to engage with these resources in the history classroom. How do we teach the differences between "online" and "offline" materials and they ways in which historians can approach them? How do we deal with issues of decontextualization and the changes brought about in historical research practices by working with digital objects? The SourceLab project tackles these issues by letting students create digital editions of historical artefacts and thereby engage them in the making of history. The Ranke.2 project provides lessons that teaches students what digital source criticism is. In this workshop we will discuss in what ways teachers use digital resources in the classroom, and what strategies, if any, they use to sensitize their students to the specificities of online materials as opposed to those found in the archive. The outcome could be a working paper which discusses the pros and cons of various approaches. [less ▲]

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See detailWorkshop : Data as a new resource? Similarities and differences of data vs. material resources
Schafer, Valerie UL; Veraart, Frank; Niet, Irene

Scientific Conference (2021, June 29)

This exploratory workshop is dedicated to scholars interested in technological developments related to digital technologies and resource developments. The workshop focusses on three notions: (1 ... [more ▼]

This exploratory workshop is dedicated to scholars interested in technological developments related to digital technologies and resource developments. The workshop focusses on three notions: (1) historical parallels of digital data with the development of other key material resources, (2) data as a commodity and its infrastructure, and (3) sustainability issues and (big)data. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (0 UL)
See detailWorkshop and hands on session: Luxembourg and the European Institutions - where all began
Lessing, Guido; Gabellini, Marco UL

Diverse speeches and writings (2018)

The Treaty establishing the European Coal and Steel Community (ECSC) signed in Paris on 18 April 1951, set up a number of institutions to carry out its activities: a High Authority, assisted by a ... [more ▼]

The Treaty establishing the European Coal and Steel Community (ECSC) signed in Paris on 18 April 1951, set up a number of institutions to carry out its activities: a High Authority, assisted by a Consultative Committee; a Common Assembly; a Special Council of Ministers; a Court of Justice. After the signing of the ECSC Treaty, an interim committee instructed to submit proposals concerning seats of the institutions, was unable to reach agreement. Many cities were suggested, such as Liège, Strasbourg, Turin or Saarbrücken. To break the deadlock in the negotiations, during the night of 24 to 25 July 1952 the Luxembourg Foreign Minister, Joseph Bech, made the proposal that the ECSC High Authority be provisionally located in Luxembourg. ‘Provisional’ became ‘definitive’, and the seat of the High Authority remained in Luxembourg until the Merger Treaty combined the executive bodies in 1965. On 10 August 1952, with the inaugural session of the High Authority, Luxembourg was the place where it all began. During our lecture at the Maison Robert Schuman, birthplace of Robert Schuman, one of the founding fathers of the European Union, we will present the country’s role in the European integration process during the 1950’s. The workshop is dedicated to discuss the different narratives on Europe’s history from a non-European perspective. The fieldtrip goes from the Maison Robert Schuman in Clausen to the Court of Justice of the European Union, which constitutes the judicial authority of the EU and, in cooperation with the courts and tribunals of the Member States, ensures the uniform application and interpretation of EU law. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 58 (10 UL)