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See detailWhat is at stake in a pedagogy of interruption?
Biesta, Gert UL

in Lewis, T. E.; Grinberg, J. G. A.; Laverty, M. (Eds.) Philosophy of Education: Modern and Contemporary Ideas at Play. (2009)

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See detailWhat is ESG and why should businesses care?
Emrick-Schmitz, Elena Ashley UL

Speeches/Talks (2018)

Sustainable or responsible investing, you’ve probably heard of it. If you haven’t yet, you will. Because the numerous cases of data breaches, employee frauds or companies finding themselves in supply ... [more ▼]

Sustainable or responsible investing, you’ve probably heard of it. If you haven’t yet, you will. Because the numerous cases of data breaches, employee frauds or companies finding themselves in supply chain or emission control scandals are all examples of businesses making poor ESG or environmental, social and governance (ESG) decisions. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat is flux balance analysis?
Orth, Jeffrey D.; Thiele, Ines UL; Palsson, Bernhard O.

in Nature Biotechnology (2010), 28(3), 245-8

Detailed reference viewed: 163 (4 UL)
See detailWhat is it impossible to think? A genealogy of the educated subject
Fendler, Lynn UL

in Popkewitz, Thomas; Brennan, Marie (Eds.) Foucault's challenge: Discourse, knowledge and power in education (1998)

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See detailWhat is Literature?
Weber, Jean-Jacques UL

in English Studies, 6 (1996)

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See detailWhat is meant by inclusion: On the effects of different definitions on attitudes toward inclusion.
Krischler, Mireille UL; Powell, Justin J W UL; Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL

in European Journal of Special Needs Education (2019), 34(5), 632-648

Aiming to further our knowledge about what is meant by inclusion, we examined how various conceptualisations relate to people’s attitudes about inclusive education. We assign the varying characterisations ... [more ▼]

Aiming to further our knowledge about what is meant by inclusion, we examined how various conceptualisations relate to people’s attitudes about inclusive education. We assign the varying characterisations of inclusion of specific groups with differing involvement in the education system in Luxembourg, applying the influential systematisation of definitions of inclusion by Göransson and Nilholm (2014). Results of study 1 showed that members of the general population, pre-service and in-service teachers perceive inclusive education in importantly different ways. Although results showed relatively positive attitudes toward inclusive education for the whole sample, attitudes varied by group and in relation to the differential categorisation of definitions. As teachers’ attitudes and the extent to which they feel prepared to implement inclusive practice are crucial for the success of inclusive education, the latter aspect is further investigated in study 2. Results showed that teachers with more in-depth understanding of inclusive education reported more positive attitudes and felt better prepared to implement inclusive practices. Implications for education systems and society are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat is Modernism?
Millim, Anne-Marie UL

in Millim, Anne-Marie (Ed.) Modernismen in Luxemburg: Traditionen, Variationen, Brüche (2018)

Despite different recent publications investigating global and lesser-known modernisms, Luxembourg remains a blank spot on the map of modernism studies. To some extent, this is surprising. As Gast Mannes ... [more ▼]

Despite different recent publications investigating global and lesser-known modernisms, Luxembourg remains a blank spot on the map of modernism studies. To some extent, this is surprising. As Gast Mannes notes in his seminal work Luxemburgische Avantgarde of 2007, the underrepresentation of Luxembourgish authors and artists in the history of high modernism is not altogether justified, due to the fact that »individual authors, partly due to bilingualism, played a special role in the transfer of ideas between France and Germany«—a fact that is little known, both in Luxembourg and abroad. To a similar extent, Luxembourg’s absence from modernism studies is unsurprising. One significant factor is that, for many years, the Luxembourgish public, cultural institutions, and creators have placed more value on works of international renown than on Luxembourgish art and literature. This article argues that understanding the invention, management, and rejection of traditions in parallel to avant-garde works is important as it valorises literary and artistic production that could be categorised as »juste milieu«, as moderately modernist, as significant, even revolutionary, in its context, even if not necessarily so from an international perspective. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat Is Negation as Failure?
Gabbay, Dov M. UL

in Logic Programs, Norms and Action - Essays in Honor of Marek J. Sergot on the Occasion of His 60th Birthday (2012)

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See detailWhat is problematic about binary questions on gender in health surveys – a missing answer analysis
Heinz, Andreas UL; Költő, András; Godeau, Emmanuelle et al

in Cogent Medicine (2020, December 04)

Background: In many studies, participants who do not state their gender are excluded from the analysis. This may be appropriate if they do not answer the questionnaire seriously. However, some ... [more ▼]

Background: In many studies, participants who do not state their gender are excluded from the analysis. This may be appropriate if they do not answer the questionnaire seriously. However, some participants may have understandable reasons for not reporting their gender, e.g. questioning their gender identity. Research question: How many students and which students do not answer the question on gender? Methods: We analyzed data of the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children study from Ireland, France, Hungary, Scotland, Belgium (Flemish) and Luxembourg (n = 40,053). To explore the reasons for non-response, we divided the participants into 3 groups: 1. Responders answered both socio- demographic questions (age and gender) 2. age non-responders did not answer the question on age. 3. Gender non-responders answered the question on age, but not the one on gender. Results: 311 out of 40,053 (0.8%) pupils aged 11–18 did not report their gender. About 40% of them did not answer the age question either. However, the other 60% belong to the group of gender non-responders and this group is disadvantaged compared to responders: they report lower self-rated health, more health complaints, less family support and more substance use (alcohol, tobacco, cannabis). 1.9% of pupils did not answer the question about age. These age non-responders answered the questionnaire more selectively overall and skipped more questions. Conclusion: The data suggest that the reasons for age non-response and gender non-response are different. For age non-responders, the fear of de-anonymization seems to be the reason for not indicating their age. Not answering the question on gender is rare. If the participants answered the question on age, but not the question on gender, then the variable gender is missing not at random. The health problems of gender non-responders correspond to the health problems of gender non-conforming adolescents. Thus, the question arises if the group of gender non-responders should be included in the analysis and if the question on gender should be asked differently in the future [less ▲]

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See detailWhat is the band gap of kesterite?
Siebentritt, Susanne UL; Rey, Germain UL; Finger, Ashley UL et al

in Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells (2015)

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See detailWhat is the dopant concentration in polycrystalline thin-film Cu(In,Ga)Se2 ?
Werner, Florian UL; Bertram, Tobias UL; Mengozzi, Jonathan et al

in Thin Solid Films (2017), 633

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See detailWhat is the effect of growth on the distribution of opportunities?
Brunori, Paolo; Palmisano, Flaviana UL; Peragine, Vito

in Research Digest (2014), 8(2),

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See detailWhat is the public role of the university? A proposal for a public research agenda.
Biesta, Gert UL; Kwiek, N.; Locke, G. et al

in European Educational Research Journal (2009), 8(2), 250-255

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See detailWhat is the Value Given by Consumers to Nutritional Label Information? Results from a Large Investigation in Europe
Gregori, Dario; Ballali, Simonetta; Vögele, Claus UL et al

in Journal of the American College of Nutrition (2015), Epub ahead of print

Rational. Nutrition labels on pre-packaged foods have been widely advocated as a medium to foster healthier eating habits in the general population. Objective. The study aimed at understanding how people ... [more ▼]

Rational. Nutrition labels on pre-packaged foods have been widely advocated as a medium to foster healthier eating habits in the general population. Objective. The study aimed at understanding how people value nutritional information on food labels, in particular front-of-pack labelling. Methods. A phone-assisted survey on 7550 consumers in 16 European countries was conducted. People were asked about their opinion on nutritional information provided at different levels, from the media to public institutions, and their commitment to healthy behavior. The value of pack labelling was estimated using a willingness-to-pay (WTP) elicitation technique. Results. Older age groups (>45 years old), members of a larger family, low income or low education level people and those who perceived themselves to be obese, valued front-of-pack nutritional labelling positively. WTP estimates across all countries provided an average accepted added price of 3.46€, additionally to the overall yearly food expenditure (95% C.I.: 3.33-3.68). Conclusions. Overall, perceived value of labelling is small. However, factors affecting the value for consumer of nutritional labelling appear to be strictly linked to the socio-economic and health status of the respondents. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat is the value of keeping patients at home if informal caregivers become exhausted to the detriment of their own life satisfaction?
Baumann, Michèle UL; Couffignal, Sophie

in Social Justice and Democratization (2012)

Cerebrovascular diseases like Alzheimer’s disease increase among European populations, and the number of patients living at home, with domestic support is growing. Our study analysed, two years post ... [more ▼]

Cerebrovascular diseases like Alzheimer’s disease increase among European populations, and the number of patients living at home, with domestic support is growing. Our study analysed, two years post-stroke, the life satisfaction (LS) and its relationships with the quality of life (QoL) of the survivors and their informal caregivers, and socioeconomic characteristics, and impaired functions. All stroke survivors admitted in hospital from the 1st July 2006 to the 30th June 2007 were selected by the National Health Insurance of Luxembourg, using the administrative reimbursement database: patients living at home and their main caregivers were interviewed with questionnaires assessing LS (one question as the European survey), survivor’s Newsqol, and caregiver’s Whoqol-bref. Ninety-four survivors (65.5 years) and 62 informal caregivers (59.3 years) were included in our analyses. Sex and occupational status had a positively effect on patients: their LS was higher in women and retired people. In opposite, patients at home without a professional activity had a much lower LS score. Adjusted for sex, occupational status and impaired motor and memory functions, patients’ LS was higher for higher scores of Newsqol dimensions of feelings, sleep, emotion, cognition, and pain, but was not correlated with any of the caregiver’s Whoqol-bref domains. Informal caregiver’s LS was negatively associated with female sex and care taking of patients with impaired memory. Similarly, it was relied to feelings and emotion Newsqol dimensions and to all Whoqol-bref domains: social relationships, psychological, physical health, and environment. The needs, resources, skills and will of the informal caregivers for taking care of the other must be better taken into account. The informal caregivers represent a “population at risk” who European health systems need to consider. Coaching patients and informal caregivers with socio-educational activities that foster positive attitudes and provide motivation, reassurance and information can help sustain home-based rehabilitation and maintain patients’ LS. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat kind of citizen? What kind of democracy? Citizenship education and the Scottish Curriculum for Excellence.
Biesta, Gert UL

in Scottish Educational Review (2008), 40(2), 38-52

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See detailWhat kind of citizenship for European Higher Education? Beyond the competent active citizen.
Biesta, Gert UL

in European Educational Research Journal (2009), 8(2), 146-157

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See detailWhat kind of deconstruction for religious education?
Biesta, Gert UL; Miedema, S.

in Religious Education (2011), 106(1), 105-108

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See detailWhat limits the efficiency of chalcopyrite solar cells
Siebentritt, Susanne UL

Scientific Conference (2011, March)

Detailed reference viewed: 125 (0 UL)