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See detailWhat drives the development of social inequality over the life course? The German TwinLife study
Hahn, E.; Gottschling, Juliana UL; Bleidorn, W. et al

in Twin Research and Human Genetics (2016), 19

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See detailWhat enhances the Life Satisfaction of postgraduates who studied in Luxembourg, in the EU or out-EU universities?
Karathanasi, Chrysoula UL; Odero, Angela UL; Karavdic, Senad et al

in Papanikos, Gregori. T. (Ed.) Education (2016)

Postgraduate students’ Life Satisfaction (LS) has been few explored, in a context where mobility towards universities abroad is increasing. In Luxembourg, more than half of students pursue their studies ... [more ▼]

Postgraduate students’ Life Satisfaction (LS) has been few explored, in a context where mobility towards universities abroad is increasing. In Luxembourg, more than half of students pursue their studies in a different country, and must be able to cope with this transition. Our research questions were (1) which factors are associated with students’ LS, according to their country of studies, and in relation to their mental health, career attitude and socioeconomic characteristics? and (2) which determinants contribute to a better LS for each group? For the years 2012 and 2013, all postgraduates who had obtained a financial aid from the Luxembourgish government were contacted by post to complete an online questionnaire. For the 492 respondents, the regression analysis showed that a higher health satisfaction leads to higher LS. Career optimism and planning were positively associated with LS for students in Luxembourg. Higher were autonomy and career adaptability, and lower was worry, better was the LS for those studying in EU. To enhance students’ LS, it is suggested a preparation for a successful mobility organized by the corresponding CEDIES of every country. Moreover, an accompaniment realized by the hosting university should be also proposed to students in mobility. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat factors can enhance Dynamic Career Attitudes of University students?
Karavdic, Senad UL; Baumann, Michèle UL

in InPACT International Psychological Applications Conference and Trends (2014)

In order to develop a University programme to prepare students for the demands of the job market our experimental study analyzes the relationships between the job search capabilities, the employability ... [more ▼]

In order to develop a University programme to prepare students for the demands of the job market our experimental study analyzes the relationships between the job search capabilities, the employability soft-skills, the domain autonomy of the quality of life and the dynamic career attitudes. During a class, 46 undergraduate students were invited to complete a self-administered paper pencil questionnaire that explores the Job search capabilities (JSC=26 items), Employability soft-skills (ESS 32 items), Quality of life autonomy domain (QoLA 4 items), and the Dynamic career attitudes (DCA 16 items). Each instrument was scored from 0 to 100. Correlation and multiple linear regression models were used for the analysis. 43 students have participated. (1) The JSC score is linked to the ESS score (r=0.561; p=0.000). (2) The ESS score, and QoL-autonomy scores are correlated to DCA score (r=0.644, p=0.000; respectively, r=0.595, p=0.000). Enhancing dynamic carrier attitudes could be stimulated with pedagogical workshops and interpersonal trainings developing students’ autonomy and employability abilities. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat Factors Contribute to the Meaning of Work? A Validation of Morin’s Meaning of Work Questionnaire
Pignault, Anne; Houssemand, Claude UL

in Psicologia, Reflexão e Crítica (2021), 34(1),

Background: Considering the recent and current evolution of work and the work context, the meaning of work is becoming an increasingly relevant topic in research in the social sciences and humanities ... [more ▼]

Background: Considering the recent and current evolution of work and the work context, the meaning of work is becoming an increasingly relevant topic in research in the social sciences and humanities, particularly in psychology. In order to understand and measure what contributes to the meaning of work, Morin (2003) constructed a 30-item questionnaire that has become predominant and has repeatedly been used in research in occupational psychology and by practitioners in the field. Nevertheless, it has been validated only in part. Method: Meaning of work questionnaire was conducted in French with 366 people (51.3% of women; age: (M = 39.11, SD = 11.25); 99.2% of whom were employed with the remainder retired). Three sets of statistical analyses were run on the data. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis were conducted on independent samples. Results: The questionnaire described a five-factor structure. These dimensions (Success and Recognition at work and of work, α= .90; Usefulness, α= .88; Respect for work, α= .88; Value from and through work, α= .83; Remuneration, α= .85) are all attached to a general second-order latent meaning of work factor (α= .96). Conclusions: Validation of the scale, and implications for health in the workplace and career counseling practices, are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat happened to the Gas Station?
Prüm, Agnès UL

Presentation (2016, January 14)

Would you buy flowers at the petrol station? This presentation examines the petrol station trope and its oscillation between site (a space where people interact) and sign or cultural signifier. It ... [more ▼]

Would you buy flowers at the petrol station? This presentation examines the petrol station trope and its oscillation between site (a space where people interact) and sign or cultural signifier. It presents the result of the empirical study carried out in the interdisciplinary research project 'IDENT2 - Strategies of Regionalisation: Constructing Identity Across Borders', and examines the transformation of the physical 'petrol station' into a 'code' that is actively used as a qualifier in popular culture and in everyday life situations. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat Happens Next? Language Learning Trajectory of an Iraqi Asylum Seeker in Luxembourg
Kalocsanyiova, Erika UL

Scientific Conference (2017, May 05)

The Grand Duchy of Luxembourg is often portrayed as a country of immigration. Official government policies continually draw upon the rhetoric of trilingualism to support claims about the country’s ... [more ▼]

The Grand Duchy of Luxembourg is often portrayed as a country of immigration. Official government policies continually draw upon the rhetoric of trilingualism to support claims about the country’s openness and multicultural spirit. This, along with the recognition of three languages – Luxembourgish, German and French – is expected to facilitate the integration of foreign nationals. It is claimed no Luxembourger is monolingual: moving fluidly back and forth between a multitude of languages is a communication method in its own right and members of the local society are believed to excel in it. Despite widespread acceptance and favourable attitudes towards multilingualism, language resources outside the recognised trilingual model have ambiguous statuses. As a result, broader societal multilingualism is perceived as problematic in numerous instances (Horner & Weber, 2008; Horner, 2015). In present-day language ideological debates, the strong presence of foreigners tends to be perceived as a threat to the established language regime and particularly to the position of the Luxembourgish language. The role of Luxembourgish as “language of integration” has been increasingly emphasised, although it is the one resource new arrivals are least likely to have in their communicative repertoires (de Bres, 2014). The often conflicting nationalist and multilingual language ideologies give rise to ambivalent messages as to what languages and what identities should be offered to newcomers, among them to the refugees who have sought international protection in Luxembourg. This contribution offers detailed insights into the linguistic integration trajectory of an Iraqi asylum seeker who arrived to Luxembourg in the summer of 2015. Our aim is to explore how his language resources are being compiled, enhanced and discarded in the course of the integration process, i.e. the reorganisation of his communicative repertoire. As integration seldom starts from scratch, first we report on language resources the research participant accumulated prior to his arrival to Luxembourg. These are being discussed in the context of his educational and professional experiences and future life-projects. Secondly, we examine his language learning trajectory bearing in mind the competing linguistic ideologies and practices refugees are required to adjust in their daily efforts to integrate in Luxembourg. Thirdly, we offer examples of the language practices he engaged in. These demonstrate how he responded to multilingual social settings in both language use and attitudes towards the languages and identities offered. Furthermore, they provide clues about what language resources have become part of his complex repertoire. Blommaert and Backus (2013) described language learning as a “process of growth” drawing attention to the fact that repertoires do not develop in linear fashion, but “explosively in some phases of life and gradually in some others”. Our data suggest that the process of repertoire-building is highly dynamic during this transition period. The research participant’s deliberate use of newly-acquired language resources, without regard to how well he knows the languages involved, indicates new forms of linguistic identification. These include fluid multilingual practices, which are considered to be expressions of his new emerging identity. This contribution presents data from an ongoing linguistic ethnographic research (obtained through interviews, classroom observations and shadowing) and will include a discussion about the challenges brought by working with vulnerable research participants and the need to research multilingually. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat Happens When Archives and Research Are Transferred into the Physical Space of a Museum: La forge d'une société moderne and Other Stories
Priem, Karin UL

in Hägele, Ulrich; Ziehe, Irene (Eds.) Populäre Präsentationen. Fotografie und Film als Medien musealer Aneignungsprozesse (2019)

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See detailWhat I love about Permaculture
Taylor Aiken, Gerald UL

Article for general public (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 99 (10 UL)
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See detailWhat industry wants from academia in software testing? Hearing practitioners’ opinions
Garousi, Vahid UL; Felderer, Michael; Kuhrmann, Marco et al

in Proceedings of International Conference on Evaluation and Assessment in Software Engineering (EASE) (2017, June 15)

The level of industry-academia collaboration (IAC) in software engineering in general and in software testing in particular is quite low. Many researchers and practitioners are not collaborating with the ... [more ▼]

The level of industry-academia collaboration (IAC) in software engineering in general and in software testing in particular is quite low. Many researchers and practitioners are not collaborating with the “other side” to solve industrial problems. To shed light on the above issue and to characterize precisely what industry wants from academia in software testing, we solicited practitioners’ opinions on their challenges in different testing activities and also the particularly relevant topics that they want the research community to work on. This short paper aims to draw the community’s attention to the important issue of strengthening IAC with the hope of more IAC in software testing in the areas of most importance to the industry. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat influences physical activity in people with heart failure?: a qualitative study.
Tierney, Stephanie; Elwers, Heather; Sange, Chandbi et al

in International journal of nursing studies (2011), 48(10), 1234-43

BACKGROUND: Research has highlighted the benefits of physical activity for people with stable heart failure in improving morbidity and quality of life. However, adherence to exercise among this patient ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Research has highlighted the benefits of physical activity for people with stable heart failure in improving morbidity and quality of life. However, adherence to exercise among this patient group is low. Barriers and enablers to sustained physical activity for individuals with heart failure have been little investigated. OBJECTIVES: To explore reasons why people with heart failure do and do not engage in regular physical activity. DESIGN: A qualitative, interview-based investigation. SETTINGS: Three heart failure clinics held at hospitals in the UK. PARTICIPANTS: Purposive sampling was adopted to provide maximum variation in terms of gender, age, heart failure duration and severity, and current activity levels. Twenty two patients (7=female) were interviewed, aged between 53 and 82 years. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were conducted via telephone. These were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Framework analysis was applied to collected data. RESULTS: Interviewees' narratives suggested that adopting positive health behaviours was complex, affected by internal and external factors. This was reflected in the four themes identified during analysis: fluctuating health; mental outlook; others' expectations; environmental influences. Failure to exercise arose because of symptoms, co-morbidities, poor sense of self as active and/or lack of perceived benefit. Likewise, encouragement from others and inclement weather affected exercising. CONCLUSIONS: Areas identified during interviews as influencing activity levels relate to those commonly found in behavioural change theories, namely perceived costs and benefits, self-efficacy and social support. These are concepts that practitioners may consider when devising interventions to assist patients with heart failure in undertaking and maintaining regular exercise patterns. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 128 (0 UL)
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See detailWhat is a good coopetitor ? An explanation in terms of centrality and personality traits
Geraudel, Mickaël UL; Salvetat, David

Scientific Conference (2009)

Detailed reference viewed: 82 (0 UL)
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See detailWhat is a Logical System? An Evolutionary View: 1964-2014
Gabbay, Dov M. UL

in Gabbay, Dov M.; Siekmann; Woods (Eds.) Computational Logic (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 102 (1 UL)
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See detailWhat Is a Successful Career in Tourism and Hospitality Academia?
Gewinner, Irina UL

Scientific Conference (2019, June 25)

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (1 UL)
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See detailWhat is an argument? Nature and necessity of generalized arguments.
Weydert, Emil UL

Scientific Conference (2018)

Detailed reference viewed: 51 (3 UL)
See detailWhat is at stake in a pedagogy of interruption?
Biesta, Gert UL

in Lewis, T. E.; Grinberg, J. G. A.; Laverty, M. (Eds.) Philosophy of Education: Modern and Contemporary Ideas at Play. (2009)

Detailed reference viewed: 688 (0 UL)
See detailWhat is ESG and why should businesses care?
Emrick-Schmitz, Elena Ashley UL

Speeches/Talks (2018)

Sustainable or responsible investing, you’ve probably heard of it. If you haven’t yet, you will. Because the numerous cases of data breaches, employee frauds or companies finding themselves in supply ... [more ▼]

Sustainable or responsible investing, you’ve probably heard of it. If you haven’t yet, you will. Because the numerous cases of data breaches, employee frauds or companies finding themselves in supply chain or emission control scandals are all examples of businesses making poor ESG or environmental, social and governance (ESG) decisions. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 82 (2 UL)
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See detailWhat is flux balance analysis?
Orth, Jeffrey D.; Thiele, Ines UL; Palsson, Bernhard O.

in Nature Biotechnology (2010), 28(3), 245-8

Detailed reference viewed: 159 (4 UL)
See detailWhat is it impossible to think? A genealogy of the educated subject
Fendler, Lynn UL

in Popkewitz, Thomas; Brennan, Marie (Eds.) Foucault's challenge: Discourse, knowledge and power in education (1998)

Detailed reference viewed: 409 (0 UL)
See detailWhat is Literature?
Weber, Jean-Jacques UL

in English Studies, 6 (1996)

Detailed reference viewed: 71 (0 UL)