Browsing
     by title


0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

or enter first few letters:   
OK
Full Text
See detailWhy engage with Digital Source Criticism?
Garcia Martin, Cristina; Scagliola, Stefania UL

Poster (2018, September 26)

This poster illustrates the concept of the teaching platform Ranke.2 with lessons on Digital Source Criticism

Detailed reference viewed: 56 (9 UL)
See detailWhy Hillary's e-mails were leaked, not Bill's
van Herck, Sytze UL

Scientific Conference (2018, November 30)

Detailed reference viewed: 7 (0 UL)
Full Text
See detailWhy is Germany not embracing the Humboldtian university?
Baker, David UL; Dusdal, Jennifer UL; Powell, Justin J W UL et al

Article for general public (2020)

Why is Germany not embracing the Humboldtian university? The focus on conducting research in independent institutes is holding the country back, say four academics.

Detailed reference viewed: 70 (3 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailWhy is it so hard? And for whom? Obstacles in the intra-EU mobility: Mobility fields in comparison
Kmiotek-Meier, Emilia Alicja UL; Ardic, Tuba; Dabasi-Halász, Zsuzsanna et al

Scientific Conference (2018, March 08)

Even though intra-European youth mobility is valued as a boost for personal and professional development, few opt for it. While obstacles preventing young people to become mobile have been discussed ... [more ▼]

Even though intra-European youth mobility is valued as a boost for personal and professional development, few opt for it. While obstacles preventing young people to become mobile have been discussed broadly, less attention has been paid to the obstacles for the youth who are already on the move. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 94 (4 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailWhy is it so hard? And for whom? Obstacles to intra-European mobility
Kmiotek-Meier, Emilia Alicja UL; Skrobanek, Jan; Nienaber, Birte UL et al

in Migration Letters (2019)

Even though intra-European youth mobility is valued as a boost for personal and professional development, few opt for it. While obstacles preventing young people to become mobile have been discussed ... [more ▼]

Even though intra-European youth mobility is valued as a boost for personal and professional development, few opt for it. While obstacles preventing young people to become mobile have been discussed broadly, less attention has been paid to the obstacles for the youth who are already on the move. We offer this rare perspective in regard to intra-European mobility. We focus on youth in four types: pupil mobility, vocational (education and training) mobility, higher education student (degree and credit) mobility and employment mobility, in six countries: Germany, Hungary, Luxembourg, Norway, Romania and Spain. Our analysis, based on qualitative (140 interviews) and quantitative (N=1.682) data, reveals that the perceived obstacles vary between the mobility types, with the greatest divergence between the educational and work-related mobilities. Obstacles such as lack of financial resources and guidance, the perceived incompatibility of institutional regulations within Europe, are shared by all mobile youth. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 188 (22 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailWhy is the Market Skewness-Return Relationship Negative?
Lehnert, Thorsten UL

Scientific Conference (2020, January 23)

The observed negative relationship between market skewness and excess return or the negative price of market skewness risk in the cross-section of stock returns is somewhat counterintuitive when we ... [more ▼]

The observed negative relationship between market skewness and excess return or the negative price of market skewness risk in the cross-section of stock returns is somewhat counterintuitive when we consider the usual interpretation of e.g. option-implied skewness as an indicator of jump risk or downside risk. One possible explanation for this inconsistency is that there are factors affecting option-implied market skewness other than jump risk in the stock market. In this paper, I find that price pressure associated with “crowded trades” of mutual funds is an important endogenous factor. Given that retail investors are prone to herding, the directional trading of mutual funds is correlated, and their collective actions can generate short-term price pressure on aggregate stock prices. Short sellers systematically exploit these patterns not only in the equity lending market, but also in the options market. In line with this economic channel, I find that firstly, the significant negative relationship between market skewness and returns becomes insignificant, once I control for price pressure. Secondly, the negative relationship is only present for the “bad” downside component of risk-neutral skewness, associated with out-of-the-money put options. For the “good” upside component of risk-neutral skewness, associated with out-of-the-money call options, the relationship is always positive. Thirdly, price pressure affects the skewness-return relationship, which can be clearly distinguished from the impact of flows on the volatility-return relationship in terms of the leverage effect. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 42 (5 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailWhy is the Market Skewness-Return Relationship Negative?
Lehnert, Thorsten UL

Scientific Conference (2019, December 13)

The observed negative relationship between market skewness and excess return or the negative price of market skewness risk in the cross-section of stock returns is somewhat counterintuitive when we ... [more ▼]

The observed negative relationship between market skewness and excess return or the negative price of market skewness risk in the cross-section of stock returns is somewhat counterintuitive when we consider the usual interpretation of e.g. option-implied skewness as an indicator of jump risk or downside risk. One possible explanation for this inconsistency is that there are factors affecting option-implied market skewness other than jump risk in the stock market. In this paper, I find that price pressure associated with “crowded trades” of mutual funds is an important endogenous factor. Given that retail investors are prone to herding, the directional trading of mutual funds is correlated, and their collective actions can generate short-term price pressure on aggregate stock prices. Short sellers systematically exploit these patterns not only in the equity lending market, but also in the options market. In line with this economic channel, I find that firstly, the significant negative relationship between market skewness and returns becomes insignificant, once I control for price pressure. Secondly, the negative relationship is only present for the “bad” downside component of risk-neutral skewness, associated with out-of-the-money put options. For the “good” upside component of risk-neutral skewness, associated with out-of-the-money call options, the relationship is always positive. Thirdly, price pressure affects the skewness-return relationship, which can be clearly distinguished from the impact of flows on the volatility-return relationship in terms of the leverage effect. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 30 (4 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailWHY IS THE MARKET SKEWNESS-RETURN RELATIONSHIP NEGATIVE?
Lehnert, Thorsten UL

Scientific Conference (2019, May 30)

Detailed reference viewed: 49 (10 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailWHY IS THE MARKET SKEWNESS-RETURN RELATIONSHIP NEGATIVE?
Lehnert, Thorsten UL

Scientific Conference (2019, July 09)

Detailed reference viewed: 102 (11 UL)
Full Text
See detailWHY IS THE MARKET SKEWNESS-RETURN RELATIONSHIP NEGATIVE?
Lehnert, Thorsten UL

E-print/Working paper (2019)

Detailed reference viewed: 87 (3 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailWhy medication or tobacco consumption enhance the life satisfaction of cardiovascular patients?
Bucki, Barbara UL; Tchicaya, Anastase; Baumann, Michèle UL

in European Health Psychologist (The) (2015), special

While life satisfaction (LS) promotes the health of cardiovascular patients, LS may be affected by a range of primary and secondary determinants. We analysed LS and its relationships with cardiovascular ... [more ▼]

While life satisfaction (LS) promotes the health of cardiovascular patients, LS may be affected by a range of primary and secondary determinants. We analysed LS and its relationships with cardiovascular risk factors and unhealthy behaviours. Methods. In 2013, 3,632 survivors who underwent coronary angiography in 2008-2009 at the Luxembourgish National Institute of Cardiac Surgery and Cardiological Intervention (INCCI), living at home were asked to estimate, five years after, their LS [1-10] and other health-related variables. Data were analysed via multiple regression models including interaction effects. Findings. LS of the 1,289 participants (age: 69.2±11.1) was 7.3/10. Most were men, employees or manual workers, had secondary education and a 36,000€ or more/year income. The interactions between hypercholesterolemia and hypertension (regression coefficient= 0.628) and with smoking (rc= 0.941) were positively related with LS, but physical inactivity was negatively associated (rc= -0.630). Discussion. Taking medications or maintaining tobacco consumption produces better LS than being ambivalent towards physical activity. Further research is needed to evaluate the efficacy of health interventions eliciting and promoting the behaviour change wheel based on capabilities, opportunities, and motivations. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 79 (5 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailWhy organically functionalized nanoparticles increase the electrical conductivity of nematic liquid crystal dispersions
Urbanski, Martin; Lagerwall, Jan UL

in Journal of Materials Chemistry C (2017), 5(34), 8802-8809

Doping liquid crystals with gold nanoparticles increases the conductivity by up to three orders of magnitude, an increase even stronger than expected for equimolar amounts of organic electrolytes. Despite ... [more ▼]

Doping liquid crystals with gold nanoparticles increases the conductivity by up to three orders of magnitude, an increase even stronger than expected for equimolar amounts of organic electrolytes. Despite recent high activity in the field of liquid crystalline nanocomposites, the origin of this increase has rarely been addressed and is not well understood. In this dielectric spectroscopy study we discuss the origin of the increased conductivity and identify its source. We demonstrate that the hydrodynamic radius of the mobile charge carrier species in nanoparticle dispersions is significantly smaller than the 3–5 nm gold core, which rules out the particles themselves to be the source of conductivity. Likewise, also the ligand molecules from the organic capping layer do not themselves add to the conductivity of the dispersions, but affect the electrical properties by acting as a trap for ionic impurities. We suggest that the partial release of these impurities upon interactions of the ligand shell with the uniaxial nematic host phase is the most likely source for the increased conductivity. Our study opens a new perspective on synthesis strategies for functionalized nanoparticles and will help to overcome the current issues preventing high-performing liquid crystal nanodispersions. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 317 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailWhy serve soup with a fork?: How policy coherence for development can link environmental impact assessment with the 2030 agenda for sustainable development
Koff, Harlan UL

in Environmental Impact Assessment Review (2021), 86

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) re-focused development cooperation on universal and transformative development aimed at improving the quality of life of people in all world regions, while ... [more ▼]

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) re-focused development cooperation on universal and transformative development aimed at improving the quality of life of people in all world regions, while simultaneously conserving natural resources. Critics, however, have correctly questioned whether appropriate policy methods and tools exist for the adequate implementation of transformative development. These challenges are even more significant given that the implementation of the SDGs falls to nation-states. This article asks “Can the transformative development promoted by the SDG’s be achieved through the policy tools presently utilized by nation-states, such as environmental impact assessment (EIA)?” The study responds to this question through a critical examination of EIA in Mexico in relation to mining. Empirical analysis focuses on the proposed Caballo Blanco open-pit mine in Veracruz state. The case can be considered critical because it is often presented as a success, given that a broad coalition of actors prevented the mine from opening through activities directed at EIA. This article questions this narrative because it shows how EIA actually can undermine transformative development through the use of cost-benefit logics. The article concludes that policy coherence for development (PCD) can potentially support EIA as a methodology through which transformative development can be promoted. PCD can improve the “normative effectiveness” of EIA when used as an evaluation criteria. Otherwise, EIA may undermine the implementation of the SDGs which would be comparable to serving soup with a fork. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 211 (11 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailWhy serve soup with a fork?: How policy coherence for development can link environmental impact assessment with the 2030 agenda for sustainable development
Koff, Harlan UL

in Environmental Impact Assessment Review (2021), 86

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) re-focused development cooperation on universal and transformative development aimed at improving the quality of life of people in all world regions, while ... [more ▼]

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) re-focused development cooperation on universal and transformative development aimed at improving the quality of life of people in all world regions, while simultaneously conserving natural resources. Critics, however, have correctly questioned whether appropriate policy methods and tools exist for the adequate implementation of transformative development. These challenges are even more significant given that the implementation of the SDGs falls to nation-states. This article asks “Can the transformative development promoted by the SDG’s be achieved through the policy tools presently utilized by nation-states, such as environmental impact assessment (EIA)?” The study responds to this question through a critical examination of EIA in Mexico in relation to mining. Empirical analysis focuses on the proposed Caballo Blanco open-pit mine in Veracruz state. The case can be considered critical because it is often presented as a success, given that a broad coalition of actors prevented the mine from opening through activities directed at EIA. This article questions this narrative because it shows how EIA actually can undermine transformative development through the use of cost-benefit logics. The article concludes that policy coherence for development (PCD) can potentially support EIA as a methodology through which transformative development can be promoted. PCD can improve the “normative effectiveness” of EIA when used as an evaluation criteria. Otherwise, EIA may undermine the implementation of the SDGs which would be comparable to serving soup with a fork. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 211 (11 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailWhy Should Judges Be independent? Reflections on Coke, Montesquieu and the French Tradition of Judicial Dependence
Heuschling, Luc UL

in Baranger, Denis; Ziegler, Katja; Bradley, Anthony W. (Eds.) Constitutionalism and the Role of Parliaments (2007)

Detailed reference viewed: 217 (6 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailWhy so few, and why so late? Green parties and the question of governmental participation
Dumont, Patrick UL; Bäck, Hanna

in EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF POLITICAL RESEARCH (2006), 45

Green parties have been represented in the parliaments of European Union countries since 1981, but it was not until recently that a few have entered national governments. Using a data set comprised of 51 ... [more ▼]

Green parties have been represented in the parliaments of European Union countries since 1981, but it was not until recently that a few have entered national governments. Using a data set comprised of 51 government formation opportunities (where the Greens were represented in parliament), the authors of this article show that the parties involved in these bargaining situations are more office-oriented than earlier studies had found. As Green parties are seen to be less office-seeking than other parties, this general tendency for office-seeking behaviour in government formation may partly account for the scarcity of Greens in government. Furthermore, a number of hypotheses derived from theories that account for the specific nature of Green parties in terms of their office-, policy- and vote-seeking orientations are tested. It is found that Greens participate in government when they have lost votes in at least one election, when the main party of the left identifies them as a clear electoral threat and when the policy distance between the Greens and either the formateur party or the main left party is small (the latter condition must be accompanied by a substantial proportion of seats for the Green party in parliament). As most of these simultaneous conditions only materialized recently, and in a few countries, it is argued that this analysis, which is the first comparative and multivariate test focused on this question, explains the scarcity and the delay of Green governmental participation. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 84 (2 UL)
See detailWhy social studies of childhood? An introduction to the handbook
Honig, Michael-Sebastian UL; Qvortrup, Jens; Corsaro, William A.

in Qvortrup, Jens; Corsaro, William A.; Honig, Michael-Sebastian (Eds.) The Palgrave Handbook of Childhood Studies (2009)

Detailed reference viewed: 71 (2 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailWhy Students Procrastinate: A Qualitative Approach
Klingsieck, Katrin B.; Grund, Axel UL; Schmid, Sebastian et al

in Journal of College Student Development (2013), 54(4), 397-412

In this study we adopted an impartial view on academic procrastination in order to gain new insights for the development of intervention programs. Following a qualitative approach, we thereby explored ... [more ▼]

In this study we adopted an impartial view on academic procrastination in order to gain new insights for the development of intervention programs. Following a qualitative approach, we thereby explored antecedents of procrastination by attending to the actual voices and experiences of 29 students. Students' subjective theories were in line with some antecedents that previous research had addressed (lack of motivation or volitional control), but also revealed relatively new aspects of academic procrastination that concern students' social relatedness and task competence. Considering these findings, we suggest ideas on how to assist students and how to design intervention programs. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 100 (3 UL)
Full Text
See detailWhy we do not care for statelessness as we care for asylum?
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL

Presentation (2019, July 07)

This presentation address the issue why statelessness is so marginalised in the migration discourse in the European Union even though is a growing phenomenon.

Detailed reference viewed: 91 (11 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailWhy ‘what works’ still won’t work. From evidence-based education to value-based education.
Biesta, Gert UL

in Studies in Philosophy & Education (2010), 29(5), 491-503

Detailed reference viewed: 274 (1 UL)