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See detailWho makes the Pie Bigger? An Experimental Study on Cooperation
Neugebauer, Tibor UL; Lacomba, J.-A.; Lagos, F.

in New Zealand Economic Papers (2011)

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See detailWho Makes, Who Breaks: Which Scientists Stay in Academe?
Balsmeier, Benjamin UL; Pellens, Maikel

in Economics Letters (2014), 122

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See detailWho owns the land? Highlights in the history of land reform
Hertweck, Florian UL; Löhr, Dirk

in Archplus (2018), (231),

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See detailWho owns the past? Überlegungen zur Repräsentation der Geschichte Luxemburgs während des Zweiten Weltkriegs in zwei ausgewählten Ausstellungen
Jungblut, Marie-Paule UL

in Hemecht : Zeitschrift für Luxemburger Geschichte = Revue d'Histoire Luxembourgeoise (2017), 3-4

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See detailWho Promotes More Innovations? Outside versus Inside Hired CEOs
Balsmeier, Benjamin UL; Buchwald, Achim

in Industrial and Corporate Change (2015), 24

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See detailWho Trade at Better Prices?
Wolff, Christian UL; Ekkayokkaya, Manapol

E-print/Working paper (2017)

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See detailWho were "the first Russians" in Luxembourg?
Ganschow, Inna UL

Speeches/Talks (2019)

"The first Russian" in Luxembourg, which arrived in the 1920ths, were not the first ones. The pre-history of the Russian presence in the Grand Duchy before WWI and the further development regarding the ... [more ▼]

"The first Russian" in Luxembourg, which arrived in the 1920ths, were not the first ones. The pre-history of the Russian presence in the Grand Duchy before WWI and the further development regarding the two world wars and the post-war situation were the topic of this radio interview. [less ▲]

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See detailWho will care for me?
Ferring, Dieter UL

in Trends in Family Caregiving in European Countries. Invited Keynote at the 20th Alzheimer Europe Conference „Facing dementia together“. Luxembourg, Luxembourg. (2010)

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See detailWho’s afraid of Donkey Kong? Testing the Stereotype Threat Effect in Video Gaming
Holl, Elisabeth UL; Wagener, Gary L.; Melzer, André UL

Scientific Conference (2019, May)

In two studies (Study 1: N = 130; Study 2: N = 56) participants played a video game (Bejeweled 3; SkyChasers) and were either confronted with a stereotype threat (ST) or not. ST is defined as the risk of ... [more ▼]

In two studies (Study 1: N = 130; Study 2: N = 56) participants played a video game (Bejeweled 3; SkyChasers) and were either confronted with a stereotype threat (ST) or not. ST is defined as the risk of confirming a negative stereotype about one’s own group and has been investigated in various field, i.a. in gaming. In the first study participants were confronted with the stereotype that women would perform worse in video games than men. In the second study we worked with a reversed stereotype, namely that women would have now outpaced males in some genres of video games. Our results show that performance varies across gender and genre. Although we did not find the hypothesized interaction effect of gender and ST condition in performance, self-reported measures, such as perceived frustration, and moderating variables indicate performance differences both for women and men, but on different psychological dimensions. [less ▲]

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See detailWho’s that girl? Körperbild, Selbsterkennung und Selbstkonzept bei jungen Frauen mit und ohne Essstörungsrisiko
Lutz, Annika UL; Herbert, Cornelia; Vögele, Claus UL

in Abstract book of 30. Symposium Klinische Psychologie und Psychotherapie der DGPS Fachgruppe Klinische Psychologie und Psychotherapie (2012)

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See detailThe WHO-5 Well-Being Index – Testing measurement invariance across 33 countries
Sischka, Philipp UL

Scientific Conference (2018, September 15)

In recent years, several studies have stressed out the importance to guarantee the comparability of theoretical constructs (i.e. measurement invariance) in the compared units (e.g., groups or time points ... [more ▼]

In recent years, several studies have stressed out the importance to guarantee the comparability of theoretical constructs (i.e. measurement invariance) in the compared units (e.g., groups or time points) in order to conduct comparative analyses (e.g. Harkness, Van de Vijver, & Mohler, 2003; Meredith, 1993; Vandenberg, & Lance, 2000). If one does not test for measurement invariance (MI) or ignores lack of invariance, differences between groups in the latent constructs cannot be unambiguously attributed to ‘real’ differences or to differences in the measurement attributes. The five-item World Health Organization Well-Being Index (WHO-5) is a frequently used brief standard measure in cross-cultural large-scale clinical studies (Topp, Østergaard, Søndergaard, & Bech, 2015). However, MI as a prerequisite for cross-country comparisons remains untested to date. We performed multigroup confirmatory factor analyses (MGCFA) and the alignment method (Asparouhov & Muthén, 2014) to test the WHO-5 for MI across 33 countries and for cross-time MI over five years. Analyses were based on data of the 2010 and 2015 waves from the European Working Condition survey (EWCS). The EWCS collected data via computer-aided personal interviews in a sample of 41,870 employees and self-employed individuals (wave 2010; wave 2015: 41,290) from the EU28 countries as well as Norway, Switzerland, Albania, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Montenegro, Serbia and Turkey. MGCFA indicated metric MI and lack of scalar MI of the WHO-5. The alignment method revealed several non-invariant parameters across countries. We estimated latent mean differences between countries with the scalar and the alignment method. The results corroborate the need to use latent variable modeling and to account for non-invariant parameters when mean levels are of concern. Furthermore, the poor performance of some items in some countries has to be considered. [less ▲]

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See detailThe WHO-5 Well-Being Index – Validation based on item response theory and the analysis of measurement invariance across 35 countries.
Sischka, Philipp UL; Pinto Coelho da Costa, Andreia UL; Steffgen, Georges UL et al

in Journal of Affective Disorders Reports (2020)

Background: The five-item World Health Organization Well-Being Index (WHO-5) is a frequently used brief standard measure in large-scale cross-cultural clinical studies. Despite its frequent use, some ... [more ▼]

Background: The five-item World Health Organization Well-Being Index (WHO-5) is a frequently used brief standard measure in large-scale cross-cultural clinical studies. Despite its frequent use, some psychometric questions remain that concern the choice of an adequate item response theory (IRT) model, the evaluation of reliability at important cutoffpoints, and most importantly the assessment of measurement invariance across countries. Methods: Data from the 6th European Working Condition survey (2015) were used that collected nationally representative samples of employed and self-employed individuals ( N = 43,469) via computer-aided personal interviews across 35 European countries. An in-depth IRT analysis was conducted for each country, testing different IRT assumptions (e.g., unidimensionality), comparing different IRT-models, and calculating reliabilities. Furthermore, measurement invariance analysis was conducted with the recently proposed alignment procedure. Results: The graded response model fitted the data best for all countries. Furthermore, IRT assumptions were mostly fulfilled. The WHO-5 showed overall and at critical points high reliability. Measurement invariance analysis revealed metric invariance but discarded scalar invariance across countries. Analysis of the test characteristic curves of the aligned graded response model indicated low levels of differential test functioning at medium levels of the WHO-5, but differential test functioning increased at more extreme levels. Limitations: The current study has no external criterion (e.g., structured clinical interviews) to assess sensitivity and specificity of the WHO-5 as a depression screening-tool. Conclusions: The WHO-5 is a psychometrically sound measure. However, large-scale cross-cultural studies should employ a latent variable modeling approach that accounts for non-invariant parameters across countries (e.g., alignment). [less ▲]

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See detailWhole genome mapping of 5' ends in bacteria by tagged sequencing: A comprehensive view in Enterococcus faecalis
Innocenti, Nicolas; Golumbeanu, Monica; Fouquier d'Hérouël, Aymeric UL et al

in RNA (New York, N.Y.) (2015), 21(5), 1018-1030

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See detailWHOQoL Psychological and employability skills among students at the universities of Luxembourg and Liege (Belgium).
Pelt, Véronique UL; Guillaume, J. F.; Baumann, Michèle UL

in Psychology & Health (2009), 26

To analyse the relationships between a psychological quality of life and employability skills among first-year students of social sciences at the universities of Luxembourg and Belgium. Method. 84 ... [more ▼]

To analyse the relationships between a psychological quality of life and employability skills among first-year students of social sciences at the universities of Luxembourg and Belgium. Method. 84 students initially registered at bachelor professional (Faculty LSHASE), and 91 at bachelor academic (Institut SHS Liege) completed questionnaires. Results Scores for psychological WHOQoL (74.3 vs 63.9 Liege) and environmental WHOQoL (73.3 vs 68.4) were better among the Luxembourg students, as was the score for employability skills (73.0 vs 68.3) than ISHS Belgium. Psychological WHOQoL score was correlated with perceived health, scores for social relationships and environmental WHOQol domains, and employability skills score (with the exceptions of the father’s professional status in Luxembourg and students age in Belgium). Effect between psychological WHOQoL and employability skills was only observed among Luxembourg students. Conclusion Good mental health is a key factor of possession of employability skills in Luxembourg where students are older and their studies are professional dies. [less ▲]

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See detailWhose Decisions, Whose Livelihoods? Resettlement and Environmental Justice in Ethiopia
Wayessa, Gutu Olana UL; Nygren, Anja

in Society and Natural Resources (2015), 29(4), 387-402

This article analyzes recent state-implemented resettlement schemes in Oromia, Ethiopia, by examining the experiences and outcomes of resettlement from the perspective of both the resettlers and hosts ... [more ▼]

This article analyzes recent state-implemented resettlement schemes in Oromia, Ethiopia, by examining the experiences and outcomes of resettlement from the perspective of both the resettlers and hosts. Besides involving transformations in people’s access to resources and the ability to earn their livelihoods, resettlement invites deep-seated questions of governance and justice. Drawing on theoretical approaches of political ecology and environmental justice, we analyse the processes and outcomes of resettlement in terms of four interlinked dimensions, including resource (re)distribution, cultural recognition, political representation, and social recovery. Special attention is paid to the questions of who decides for whom, and who lives the consequences. The analysis is based on a mixed-methods approach, involving a combination of qualitative interviews and a quantitative survey. We conclude that both the resettlers and the hosts experienced uneven redistribution of resources and unfair forms of recognition and political representation, which in tandem limited their possibilities for social recovery. [less ▲]

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See detailWhose law for sharing research tools?
Balling, Rudi UL

in Nature (1998), 396(6711), 509

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See detailWhy 21st century children need to excel at problem solving
Greiff, Samuel UL; Müller, Jonas UL

Article for general public (2014)

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See detailWhy always me? (Says the European Union). Il referendum svizzero sull'immigrazione, le relazioni con l'UE e le ricadute sull'economia
Zaccaroni, Giovanni UL

in Quaderni della Società Italiana di Diritto Internazionale (2014), I

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See detailThe why and the how of studying Hybrid Learning
Burton, Réginald UL; Mancuso, Giovanna UL

in Learning and Instruction (n.d.)

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