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See detailWhen entrepreneurs instigate institutional change through coopetition: The case of winemakers in south of France
Granata, Julien; Geraudel, Mickaël UL; D'Armagnac, Sophie

in Strategic Change (2019), 28(6), 409-422

Winemakers in South France combine contingently institutional logics to achieve economic performance. Entrepreneurs who decide to cooperate with their competitors must manage four phases of “coopetition” ... [more ▼]

Winemakers in South France combine contingently institutional logics to achieve economic performance. Entrepreneurs who decide to cooperate with their competitors must manage four phases of “coopetition”: launch, formalization, protection, and reinforcement. They engage in the coopetition process by referring to a professional logic that becomes dominant, and they complete the process by fostering a community logic that is combined with the professional logic. Identity and legitimacy are the key elements that entrepreneurs segregate and blend, which entails new combinations in the respective influential power of state logic, professional logic and community logic. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 100 (0 UL)
See detailWhen historians create their archives: the making of covidmemory project
Brüll, Christoph UL

Scientific Conference (2020, June 30)

Detailed reference viewed: 48 (5 UL)
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See detailWhen I Look into Your Eyes: A Survey on Computer Vision Contributions for Human Gaze Estimation and Tracking
Cazzato, Dario UL; Leo, Marco; Distante, Cosimo et al

in Sensors (2020), 20(13), 3739

The automatic detection of eye positions, their temporal consistency, and their mapping into a line of sight in the real world (to find where a person is looking at) is reported in the scientific ... [more ▼]

The automatic detection of eye positions, their temporal consistency, and their mapping into a line of sight in the real world (to find where a person is looking at) is reported in the scientific literature as gaze tracking. This has become a very hot topic in the field of computer vision during the last decades, with a surprising and continuously growing number of application fields. A very long journey has been made from the first pioneering works, and this continuous search for more accurate solutions process has been further boosted in the last decade when deep neural networks have revolutionized the whole machine learning area, and gaze tracking as well. In this arena, it is being increasingly useful to find guidance through survey/review articles collecting most relevant works and putting clear pros and cons of existing techniques, also by introducing a precise taxonomy. This kind of manuscripts allows researchers and technicians to choose the better way to move towards their application or scientific goals. In the literature, there exist holistic and specifically technological survey documents (even if not updated), but, unfortunately, there is not an overview discussing how the great advancements in computer vision have impacted gaze tracking. Thus, this work represents an attempt to fill this gap, also introducing a wider point of view that brings to a new taxonomy (extending the consolidated ones) by considering gaze tracking as a more exhaustive task that aims at estimating gaze target from different perspectives: from the eye of the beholder (first-person view), from an external camera framing the beholder’s, from a third-person view looking at the scene where the beholder is placed in, and from an external view independent from the beholder. [less ▲]

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See detailWhen items become victims: Brand memory in violent and nonviolent games
Melzer, André UL; Bushman, B. J.; Hofmann, U. G.

Scientific journal (2008)

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See detailWhen Machiavelli breaks across borders: child protection and disability rights in the face of neoliberal and global social work
Limbach-Reich, Arthur UL; Schulze-Kruedener, Joergen

Presentation (2020, June)

A neoliberal and globally organized social work is the focus of this presentation, which discusses the very first results of an transnational research project on cross-border child protection and ... [more ▼]

A neoliberal and globally organized social work is the focus of this presentation, which discusses the very first results of an transnational research project on cross-border child protection and disability rights in the Greater Region including Belgium, Germany, France and Luxembourg (EUR&QUA) According to UN Conventions (UNCRC, 1990 and UNCRPD, 2006), States Parties shall ensure and promote the full realisation of all human rights and fundamental freedoms for all children and persons with disabilities. Essentially, the Conventions call upon States Parties to take legislative, administrative and other measures to implement the rights recognised in both Conventions. Such imperatives seem to contradict a neoliberal social policy, which is oriented towards restraint in market intervention, strict austerity and cost reduction, and individualisation of social problems (Cummins, 2018). Actually, initial research results suggest that cross-border social work care for children and their families is not always sufficient. Crossing the border often means breaking off helping relations in the home country and there is hardly any professional exchange between social work providers involved. As a result, a return to the original life context desired by the clients seems hardly feasible (EUR&QUA 2019). Furthermore, practitioners expressed concern that diagnoses and support needs were formulated with a targeted focus on care in a neighbouring country. The research also identified cases that were not in line with the Brussels-II-Treaty on cross-border custody procedures. Some results may be derived less from optimal child protection and disability rights than from neo-liberalism, managerialism and austerity. In order to counter this development, social work needs something like Machiavellian competences (Kusiak, 2018; Drouard, 2008), which consist of critically illuminating a dominant ideology, conducting empirical research and acquiring the corresponding strategic knowledge. To this end, the research project aims to establish a Master's programme to empower future social worker in cross-boarder protection tasks. [less ▲]

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See detailWhen Machiavelli meets social Work: cross-border child protection and disability rights - shifting from marketisation of social care to post neoliberalism and re-conquest of public responsibility.
Limbach-Reich, Arthur UL; Schulze-Kruedener, Joergen

Scientific Conference (2020)

Against the background of neoliberal and globally organized social work, the presentation discusses the very first results of the international research project on cross-border child protection and ... [more ▼]

Against the background of neoliberal and globally organized social work, the presentation discusses the very first results of the international research project on cross-border child protection and disability rights in transnational settings (EUR&QUA). According to international Conventions (UNCRC, 1990; UNCRPD, 2006), States parties shall ensure the full realization of all human rights and fundamental freedoms for all children. Such imperatives seem to contradict neoliberal social policy, which is primarily oriented towards marketisation, austerity, and individualisation of social problems (Cummins, 2018). Actually, our research suggests that crossing borders often means breaking off helping relations and absence of professional exchange between care providers. A return to the original life context desired by the clients seems unfeasible. Therefore, we plead for social workers to acquire global, and cross-border competences in this field. Social work needs Machiavellian competences (Kusiak, 2018), which consist of critically illuminating a dominant ideology, conducting research, and acquiring strategic knowledge. [less ▲]

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See detailWhen numbers act as attentional cues: behavioral and fMRI investigations
Goffaux, Valerie; Hoffmann, Danielle UL; Martin, Romain UL et al

Poster (2011, February 11)

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See detailWhen numbers act as attentional cues: behavioral, EEG and fMRI investigations
Schiltz, Christine UL

Presentation (2011, December 16)

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See detailWhen One Religious Extremism Unmasks Another: Reflections on Europe’s States of Emergency as a Legacy of Ordo-Liberal De-hermeneuticisation
Van Der Walt, Johan Willem Gous UL

in New Perspectives: Interdisciplinary Journal of Central and East European Politics and International Relations (2016), 24(1), 79-101

This intervention explores the extent to which the technocratic de-hermeneutisation of European political economical thinking, of which the ordoliberal economic principles of the Freiburg school in ... [more ▼]

This intervention explores the extent to which the technocratic de-hermeneutisation of European political economical thinking, of which the ordoliberal economic principles of the Freiburg school in Economics are a key ingredient - may be contributing to the social conditions under which religious radicalisation typically takes place, or may at least be failing to provide significant responses on the basis of which religious radicalisation can be countered. [less ▲]

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See detailWhen one-two-three beats two-one-three: Tracking the acquisition of the verbal number sequence.
Van Rinsveld, Amandine; Schiltz, Christine UL; Majerus, Steve et al

in Psychonomic bulletin & review (2020), 27(1), 122-129

Learning how to count is a crucial step in cognitive development, which progressively allows for more elaborate numerical processing. The existing body of research consistently reports how children ... [more ▼]

Learning how to count is a crucial step in cognitive development, which progressively allows for more elaborate numerical processing. The existing body of research consistently reports how children associate the verbal code with exact quantity. However, the early acquisition of this code, when the verbal numbers are encoded in long-term memory as a sequence of words, has rarely been examined. Using an incidental assessment method based on serial recall of number words presented in ordered versus non-ordered sequences (e.g., one-two-three vs. two-one-three), we tracked the progressive acquisition of the verbal number sequence in children aged 3-6 years. Results revealed evidence for verbal number sequence knowledge in the youngest children even before counting is fully mastered. Verbal numerical knowledge thus starts to be organized as a sequence in long-term memory already at the age of 3 years, and this numerical sequence knowledge is assessed in a sensitive manner by incidental rather than explicit measures of number knowledge. [less ▲]

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See detailWhen Redistribution Leads to Regressive Taxation
Hariton, Cyril; Piaser, Gwenaël UL

in Journal of Public Economic Theory (2007), 9(4), 589-606

We introduce labor contracts in a framework of optimal redistribution: firms have some local market power and try to discriminate among heterogeneous workers. In this setting we show that if the firms ... [more ▼]

We introduce labor contracts in a framework of optimal redistribution: firms have some local market power and try to discriminate among heterogeneous workers. In this setting we show that if the firms have perfect information, i.e., they perfectly discriminate against workers and take all the surplus, the best tax function is flat. If firms have imperfect information, i.e., if they offer incentive contracts, then (under some assumptions) the best redistributive taxation is regressive. [less ▲]

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See detailWhen small is left and large is right : Behavioural evidence for attentional shifts due to irrelevant numerical cues
Hoffmann, Danielle UL; Goffaux, Valérie; Schiltz, Christine UL

Poster (2010)

Numerous behavioural studies indicate the existence of a link between numerical representations and visuo-spatial processes (for review see DeHevia et al., 2008). A striking demonstration of this link was ... [more ▼]

Numerous behavioural studies indicate the existence of a link between numerical representations and visuo-spatial processes (for review see DeHevia et al., 2008). A striking demonstration of this link was provided by Fischer and colleagues (2003), who reported that participants detect a target faster in the left hemifield, if preceded by a small number (e.g. 2 or 3) and faster in the right hemifield if preceded by a large number (e.g. 8 or 9). This is strong evidence that numbers orient visuo-spatial attention to the left or right hemifield, depending on their magnitude (e.g., small and large, respectively) (see also Galfano et al., 2006; Ristic et al., 2006). We designed a modified version of this target detection paradigm, by replacing the detection task with a target discrimination task (cf. Hommel et al., 2001). The participants (n=16) were presented 1 task irrelevant digit (1,2 vs. 8,9) for 400ms. After a variable inter-stimulus interval (500, 1000 or 2000ms), they had to discriminate the colour of a brief (100ms) lateral target. We hypothesized that the centrally presented numbers would induce an orientation of attention, in the same direction as the initial observations by Fischer et al. (2003). The current results indicate a significant effect, but only for the shortest digit-target interval (500ms). We observed a significant interaction between number magnitude (small/large) and side of target presentation (left/right) (F1,15 =7.784, p<0.014). These findings indicate that the attentional shifts induced by irrelevant numerical material are independent of the exact nature of target processing (discrimination vs. detection). [less ▲]

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See detailWhen solidarity melts into air: Philippines-born women migrants in Australia
Espinosa, Shirlita Africa UL

Book published by Bloomsbury Academic (in press)

This chapter looks at the (mis)recognition of the symbolic violence engendered by intra-ethnic women's solidarity in the context of international sexual division of labor. In particular I focus on the ... [more ▼]

This chapter looks at the (mis)recognition of the symbolic violence engendered by intra-ethnic women's solidarity in the context of international sexual division of labor. In particular I focus on the publications of Philippines-born women migrant's organisations. The chapter interrogates the violence of documenting the struggle against racialist and elitist marginalisation of migrant women in the context of multicultural Australia. [less ▲]

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See detailWhen Text Authors Lived Using Undated Citations
Mughaz, Dror; HaCohen-Kerner, Yaakov; Gabbay, Dov M. UL

in Lamas, David; Buitelaar, Paul (Eds.) Multidisciplinary Information Retrieval (2014)

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See detailWhen the exception becomes the rule … When the margins become the center …
Schafer, Valerie UL

Scientific Conference (2018, August 23)

This contribution invited participants of the Summer school to critically reflect upon centers and peripheries in Internet history, not only from a geographical perspective , but also from a narrative ... [more ▼]

This contribution invited participants of the Summer school to critically reflect upon centers and peripheries in Internet history, not only from a geographical perspective , but also from a narrative standpoint [less ▲]

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See detailWhen the Foundations of Life have been Upset… An Integrated Clinical and Experimental Study with Refugees and Asylum Seekers
Schiltz, Lony; Schiltz, Jang UL

in Archives of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy (2013), 15(2), 53-62

Aim Recent research results in clinical psychology, health psychology and neurobiology underline the relationship between dissociative states, complex posttraumatic syndromes and borderline functioning ... [more ▼]

Aim Recent research results in clinical psychology, health psychology and neurobiology underline the relationship between dissociative states, complex posttraumatic syndromes and borderline functioning [11]. Our study is meant to investigate the traumatic hypothesis of borderline functioning and to develop appropriate psychotherapeutic measures based on artistic mediations. Material and Methods.To estimate the effect of traumatic events, from the beginning of life up to recent stressors, linked to natural catastrophes, war, political persecution and migration, we undertook an integrated clinical and experimental study with a sample of 73 refugees and asylum seekers. In a second stage, those who suffered from PTSD or complex post-traumatic states were offered to attend arts psychotherapeutic sessions.. To investigate the personality functioning at the structural level, we used a mixed quantitative and qualitative methodology, combining a semi-structured biographical interview, a projective test, i.e. the Sentences Completion Test, for which we developed a new manner of interpretation , and psychometric scales, i.e. the HADS and the Index of Wellbeing . Furthermore, we analysed the artistic production (pictures, stories written under musical induction) with the help of rating scales constructed in the phenomenological and structural tradition. Results. With the help of non parametric multidimensional statistics, we extracted two profiles of personality functioning, linked either to repeated breaks, negligence and maltreatment from the beginning of life, or either to a recent external catastrophe, interrupting a continuous life course. Through the evaluation of the arts therapeutic sessions, we could note the first signs of resumption of the blocked process of subjectivation. Discussion.The results of the study support the traumatogenic hypothesis of borderline functioning, as well as current clinical considerations concerning the defensive role of dissociation in complex posttraumatic states. Conclusion. The study opens tracks for future research concerning an in depth investigation of the arts therapeutic process with traumatized people. [less ▲]

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See detailWhen the reality of death strikes: Ways of dealing with existential fears in cancer patients.
Hoffmann, Martine UL; Ferring, Dieter UL

in Psychology and Health (2009), 24(1)

In the present study existential fears and concerns in cancer patients were explored with respect to coping behavior and measures of subjective well-being. Thereby, cancer-related existential fears were ... [more ▼]

In the present study existential fears and concerns in cancer patients were explored with respect to coping behavior and measures of subjective well-being. Thereby, cancer-related existential fears were assessed by means of a newly developed six-item scale. The study sample consisted of 126 patients undergoing ambulant treatment for different types of cancer. Data were collected at the University of Luxembourg, in cooperation with several medical centers and cancer foundations in Luxembourg, Germany and France. Results highlighted the importance of existential fears in cancer patients. Cluster analyses resulted in a two clustersolution, regrouping patients ‘‘high’’ and ‘‘low’’ levels of existential fears. Analyses of variance indicated that the cluster displaying high levels of existential fears showed significantly higher levels of ‘‘rumination’’ than the other cluster, associated with increased levels of ‘‘hopelessness’’ and lower ‘‘self-esteem’’. Results are discussed with respect to intervention programs focusing on the regulation of anxiety in cancer patients. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 45 (1 UL)