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See detailWhat is the value of keeping patients at home if informal caregivers become exhausted to the detriment of their own life satisfaction?
Baumann, Michèle UL; Couffignal, Sophie

in Social Justice and Democratization (2012)

Cerebrovascular diseases like Alzheimer’s disease increase among European populations, and the number of patients living at home, with domestic support is growing. Our study analysed, two years post ... [more ▼]

Cerebrovascular diseases like Alzheimer’s disease increase among European populations, and the number of patients living at home, with domestic support is growing. Our study analysed, two years post-stroke, the life satisfaction (LS) and its relationships with the quality of life (QoL) of the survivors and their informal caregivers, and socioeconomic characteristics, and impaired functions. All stroke survivors admitted in hospital from the 1st July 2006 to the 30th June 2007 were selected by the National Health Insurance of Luxembourg, using the administrative reimbursement database: patients living at home and their main caregivers were interviewed with questionnaires assessing LS (one question as the European survey), survivor’s Newsqol, and caregiver’s Whoqol-bref. Ninety-four survivors (65.5 years) and 62 informal caregivers (59.3 years) were included in our analyses. Sex and occupational status had a positively effect on patients: their LS was higher in women and retired people. In opposite, patients at home without a professional activity had a much lower LS score. Adjusted for sex, occupational status and impaired motor and memory functions, patients’ LS was higher for higher scores of Newsqol dimensions of feelings, sleep, emotion, cognition, and pain, but was not correlated with any of the caregiver’s Whoqol-bref domains. Informal caregiver’s LS was negatively associated with female sex and care taking of patients with impaired memory. Similarly, it was relied to feelings and emotion Newsqol dimensions and to all Whoqol-bref domains: social relationships, psychological, physical health, and environment. The needs, resources, skills and will of the informal caregivers for taking care of the other must be better taken into account. The informal caregivers represent a “population at risk” who European health systems need to consider. Coaching patients and informal caregivers with socio-educational activities that foster positive attitudes and provide motivation, reassurance and information can help sustain home-based rehabilitation and maintain patients’ LS. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 94 (2 UL)
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See detailWhat kind of citizen? What kind of democracy? Citizenship education and the Scottish Curriculum for Excellence.
Biesta, Gert UL

in Scottish Educational Review (2008), 40(2), 38-52

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See detailWhat kind of citizenship for European Higher Education? Beyond the competent active citizen.
Biesta, Gert UL

in European Educational Research Journal (2009), 8(2), 146-157

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See detailWhat kind of deconstruction for religious education?
Biesta, Gert UL; Miedema, S.

in Religious Education (2011), 106(1), 105-108

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See detailWhat limits the efficiency of chalcopyrite solar cells
Siebentritt, Susanne UL

Scientific Conference (2011, March)

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See detailWhat limits the efficiency of chalcopyrite solar cells?
Siebentritt, Susanne UL

in Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells (2011), 95

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See detailWhat limits the efficiency of CIGS solar cells? And what can theory do to shift the limits?
Siebentritt, Susanne UL

Scientific Conference (2010, September)

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See detailWhat makes a problem complex? Factors determining difficulty in dynamic situations and implications for diagnosing complex problem solving competence
Greiff, Samuel UL; Funke, Joachim

in Zumbach, Joerg; Schwartz, Neil; Seufert, Tina (Eds.) et al Beyond knowledge: the legacy of competence (2008)

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See detailWhat makes Data Science different? A discussion involving Statistics2.0 and Computational Sciences
Ley, Christophe; Bordas, Stéphane UL

E-print/Working paper (2017)

Data Science is today one of the main buzzwords be it in business, industrial or academic settings. Machine learning, experimental design, data-driven modelling are all, undoubtedly, rising disciplines if ... [more ▼]

Data Science is today one of the main buzzwords be it in business, industrial or academic settings. Machine learning, experimental design, data-driven modelling are all, undoubtedly, rising disciplines if one goes by the soaring number of research papers and patents appearing each year. The prospect of becoming a ``Data Scientist'' appeals to many. A discussion panel organised as part of the European Data Science Conference (European Association for Data Science (EuADS)) asked the question: ``What makes Data Science different?'' In this paper we give our own, personal and multi-facetted view on this question, from an engineering and a statistics perspective. In particular, we compare Data Science to Statistics and discuss the connection between Data Science and Computational Science. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat makes internationally-financed climate change adaptation projects focus on local communities? A configurational analysis of 30 Adaptation Fund projects
Manuamorn, Ornsaran Pomme; Biesbroek, Robbert; Cebotari, Victor UL

in Global Environmental Change (2020), 61(March), 102035

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See detailWhat might a sustainable university look like? Challenges and opportunities in the development of the University of Luxembourg and its new campus
König, Ariane UL

in König, Ariane (Ed.) Regenerative Sustainable Development of Universities and Cities (2013)

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See detailWhat our eyes tell us about feelings: Tracking pupillary responses during emotion regulation processes
Kinner, Valerie, L.; Kuchinke, Lars; Dierolf, Angelika UL et al

in Psychophysiology (2017), 54(4),

Emotion regulation is essential for adaptive behavior and mental health. Strategies applied to alter emotions are known to differ in their impact on psychological and physiological aspects of the ... [more ▼]

Emotion regulation is essential for adaptive behavior and mental health. Strategies applied to alter emotions are known to differ in their impact on psychological and physiological aspects of the emotional response. However, emotion regulation outcome has primarily been assessed via self‐report, and studies comparing regulation strategies with regard to their peripheral physiological mechanisms are limited in number. In the present study, we therefore aimed to investigate the effects of different emotion regulation strategies on pupil dilation, skin conductance responses, and subjective emotional responses. Thirty healthy females were presented with negative and neutral pictures and asked to maintain or up‐ and downregulate their upcoming emotional responses through reappraisal or distraction. Pupil dilation and skin conductance responses were significantly enhanced when viewing negative relative to neutral pictures. For the pupil, this emotional arousal effect manifested specifically late during the pupillary response. In accordance with subjective ratings, increasing negative emotions through reappraisal led to the most prominent pupil size enlargements, whereas no consistent effect for downregulation was found. In contrast, early peak dilations were enhanced in all emotion regulation conditions independent of strategy. Skin conductance responses were not further modulated by emotion regulation. These results indicate that pupil diameter is modulated by emotional arousal, but is initially related to the extent of mental effort required to regulate automatic emotional responses. Our data thus provide first evidence that the pupillary response might comprise two distinct temporal components reflecting cognitive emotion regulation effort on the one hand and emotion regulation success on the other hand. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat Public Keys Can Do for Three-Party, Password-Authenticated Key Exchange
Lancrenon, Jean UL

in Sokratis; Agudo, Isaac (Eds.) Public Key Infrastructures, Services and Applications: 10th European Workshop, EuroPKI 2013, Egham, UK, September 12-13, 2013, Revised Selected Papers (2014, September)

We study three-party, password-authenticated key exchange protocols where the trusted third party has a high-entropy private key to which corresponds a public key. In this scenario we can maintain the ... [more ▼]

We study three-party, password-authenticated key exchange protocols where the trusted third party has a high-entropy private key to which corresponds a public key. In this scenario we can maintain the user-friendliness of password authentication while provably achieving security properties that ordinary password-authenticated key exchange protocols cannot, namely resistance against key compromise impersonation and a special form of internal state revealing. We define security models tailored to our case and illustrate our work with several protocols. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat research agenda could be generated from the European General Practice Research Network concept of Multimorbidity in Family Practice?
Le Reste, J. Y.; Nabbe, P.; Lingner, H. et al

in BMC family practice (2015), 16(1), 125

BACKGROUND: Multimorbidity is an intuitively appealing, yet challenging, concept for Family Medicine (FM). An EGPRN working group has published a comprehensive definition of the concept based on a ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Multimorbidity is an intuitively appealing, yet challenging, concept for Family Medicine (FM). An EGPRN working group has published a comprehensive definition of the concept based on a systematic review of the literature which is closely linked to patient complexity and to the biopsychosocial model. This concept was identified by European Family Physicians (FPs) throughout Europe using 13 qualitative surveys. To further our understanding of the issues around multimorbidity, we needed to do innovative research to clarify this concept. The research question for this survey was: what research agenda could be generated for Family Medicine from the EGPRN concept of Multimorbidity? METHODS: Nominal group design with a purposive panel of experts in the field of multimorbidity. The nominal group worked through four phases: ideas generation phase, ideas recording phase, evaluation and analysis phase and a prioritization phase. RESULTS: Fifteen international experts participated. A research agenda was established, featuring 6 topics and 11 themes with their corresponding study designs. The highest priorities were given to the following topics: measuring multimorbidity and the impact of multimorbidity. In addition the experts stressed that the concept should be simplified. This would be best achieved by working in reverse: starting with the outcomes and working back to find the useful variables within the concept. CONCLUSION: The highest priority for future research on multimorbidity should be given to measuring multimorbidity and to simplifying the EGPRN model, using a pragmatic approach to determine the useful variables within the concept from its outcomes. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat role for (alleged) victims in the forum choice?
Simonato, Michele UL

Presentation (2015, September 01)

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See detailWhat role for planning in the Western Balkans?
Blondel, Cyril UL

Scientific Conference (2010, February)

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (0 UL)
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See detailWhat Security for Electronic Exams?
Giustolisi, Rosario UL; Lenzini, Gabriele UL; Bella, Giampaolo

in 8th International Conference onRisk and Security of Internet and Systems (CRiSIS), 2013 (2013)

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See detailWhat Social Inequalities of Quality of Life (NEWSQOL domains) amongst patients does appear, two years after a stroke?
Baumann, Michèle UL; Lurbe-Puerto, Katia UL; Le Bihan, Etienne UL

in European Society for Health and Medical Sociology (2010)

The quality of live “capability” must be taken into consideration because it affects stroke patients’ ability to make health choices. We aimed to analyse the relations between their socio-demographic ... [more ▼]

The quality of live “capability” must be taken into consideration because it affects stroke patients’ ability to make health choices. We aimed to analyse the relations between their socio-demographic characteristics and their quality of life (domains selected: interpersonal relationship, emotions, feelings, pain, sleep, fatigue). Methods: Two years after their stroke, 72 volunteers participated to a Luxembourg national survey. Completed at their home, the questionnaire included the six NEWSQOL* domains that responded to the criterion of an absence of direct consequence of the injuries caused by the stroke. For each domain, a multiple regression model was fit and adjusted by impairments (motor, vision, sensory, language, and memory). We performed a backward selection discarding, in succession, variables associated with highest p-values, until we obtained a set of explanatory variables significantly linked at the 10% level. Results: To be a woman is positively linked to a better quality of life (interpersonal relationships, feelings, sleep). The older patients and the ones living in couple have a less good quality of life with regards to fatigue. The current professional situation does not have any impact on quality of life; which is not the case for the occupation at the time of the stroke. Compared to the executives’ ones, the patients who never had a job, employees, and manual workers have a worse quality of life in terms of feelings. The manual workers, employees and the ones who never had a job show a minor good quality of life in relation to fatigue. When the patients’ educational level is lower than the first cycle of secondary education, their quality of life deteriorates in terms of interpersonal relationship, emotion, feelings, pain. After the stroke, changes in the financial position resulted in a less good quality of life in relation to interpersonal relationship, feelings, pain, sleep, whilst the ones in the occupational situation only worsened patients’ feelings and fatigue. “Feelings” (depression, control, independent) is the most associated NEWSQOL-domain with the socio-economic factors. Conclusion: Patients’ level of education and the changes in their financial position are determinants of social inequalities of quality of life amongst stroke survivors. A better elementary health education on stroke would make upcoming patients to gain in quality of life capacity. They will better adhere to the advice given within the therapeutics framework and psychological counseling as well as to the social accompaniment provided and the administrative requirements they have to accomplish to obtain financial aids. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat strategies are effective for exercise adherence in heart failure? A systematic review of controlled studies.
Tierney, Stephanie; Mamas, Mamas; Woods, Stephen et al

in Heart failure reviews (2012), 17(1), 107-15

Physical activity is recommended for people with stable heart failure (HF), because it is known to improve quality of life and health outcomes. However, adherence to this recommendation has been poor in ... [more ▼]

Physical activity is recommended for people with stable heart failure (HF), because it is known to improve quality of life and health outcomes. However, adherence to this recommendation has been poor in many studies. A systematic review was conducted to examine the effectiveness of strategies used to promote exercise adherence in those with HF. The following databases were searched for relevant literature published between January 1980 and December 2010: British Nursing Index; CINAHL; Cochrane Library; Embase; Medline and PsycINFO. Papers with a control group focused on adults with HF that measured exercise or physical activity adherence were included. Nine randomised controlled trials were identified, involving a total of 3,231 patients (range 16-2,331). Six of these studies were informed by specific psychological theories. Positive outcomes occurred in the short-term from interventions using approaches such as exercise prescriptions, goal setting, feedback and problem-solving. However, longer-term maintenance of exercise was less successful. There was some support for interventions underpinned by theoretical frameworks, but more research is required to make clearer recommendations. Addressing self-efficacy in relation to exercise may be a particularly useful area to consider in this respect. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat they highlight is ...: The discourse functions of basic wh-clefts in lectures.
Deroey, Katrien UL

in Journal of English for Academic Purposes (2012), 11(2), 112-124

This paper reports findings from a study on the discourse functions of basic wh-clefts such as what our brains do is complicated information processing in 160 lectures drawn from the British Academic ... [more ▼]

This paper reports findings from a study on the discourse functions of basic wh-clefts such as what our brains do is complicated information processing in 160 lectures drawn from the British Academic Spoken English (BASE) corpus. Like much linguistic research on this academic genre, the investigation is motivated by the need to gain a better understanding of language use in lectures to aid effective English for Academic Purposes (EAP) course design. To this end, the composition of the wh-clauses was analysed for its main constituents (subjects, verb phrases and modality) and the clefts were grouped according to their apparent main function and subfunction within the lecture discourse. The results show that basic wh-clefts mostly serve to highlight aspects of content information and there was also disciplinary variation in their use. Implications for EAP course design are discussed. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 185 (2 UL)