Browsing
     by title


0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

or enter first few letters:   
OK
Peer Reviewed
See detailSmall deformations of polygons and polyhedra
Schlenker, Jean-Marc UL

in Trans. Amer. Math. Soc. (2007), 359(5), 2155--2189

Detailed reference viewed: 145 (0 UL)
See detailSmall in size, great in significance: conspicilla and perspicilla in the visual arts of the Low Countries around 1600
Koeleman, Floor UL

Scientific Conference (2021, July)

A largely forgotten constcamer painting from the early seventeenth century shows eyeglasses and a telescope in close proximity. The inclusion of these extensions of sight in The Five Senses of the Musée ... [more ▼]

A largely forgotten constcamer painting from the early seventeenth century shows eyeglasses and a telescope in close proximity. The inclusion of these extensions of sight in The Five Senses of the Musée Magnin (Dijon) seems to allude to the implicit link between the two. As tools to observe with and through, these instruments visualize the limits of human perception and the ability to alter the scale of the visible world. The Five Senses was created in Antwerp around the same time the telescope first appeared in textual sources, namely 1608. However, the optical instrument is likely to have existed for years by then. This paper investigates if any references to the telescope in the visual arts predate the first written evidence of its invention. For artists the early telescope was probably not that challenging an object to represent. The exterior, a simple tube characterized by a diaphragm, housed two lenses made by the same glass industry that manufactured eyeglasses. This paper takes a closer look at the imagery of eyeglasses and telescopes, depicted in the visual arts of the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. The meaning assigned to these instruments can be inferred from the context in which they are presented and their relative scale. Together eyeglasses and telescopes feature prominently in constcamer paintings dedicated to visual perception, understood both physically and metaphysically. While the exact date of creation remains subject to debate, The Five Senses probably contains the earliest known depiction of a telescope – true to scale. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 243 (5 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detail“Small is impactful”. Memes and Politics
Pailler, Fred UL; Schafer, Valerie UL

Scientific Conference (2022, October 20)

From the Hampster Dance and the Dancing Baby in the second half of the 1990s to the hijacking meme of Bernie and his mittens at the US presidential inauguration or the images of the Evergreen blocked in ... [more ▼]

From the Hampster Dance and the Dancing Baby in the second half of the 1990s to the hijacking meme of Bernie and his mittens at the US presidential inauguration or the images of the Evergreen blocked in the Suez Canal, memes have become in the last twenty years an important part of our digital cultures (Shifman, 2014), whose often absurd, playful, corrosive and viral character cannot hide also multiple political dimensions. To the question "Do Memes have politics", to paraphrase Langdon Winner (1980), the answer is undoubtedly yes and this presentation aims to analyse the many levels of politics and agencies at stake when studying memes and their impact, in terms of digital cultures, governance, curation, sharing (John, 2017), appropriation by several communities, but also writing of their history. The first part of the presentation unfolded several levels of politics, starting with the most obvious (memes address political aspects, see for example Denisova, 2019 or Askanius and Keller, 2021) to the more hidden levels (politics of meme generators, of heritagization platform like Know your Meme (Pettis, 2021), of curation …). Relying on a diachronic approach, from the Godwin Law to Distracted Boyfriend, through Leave Britney Alone, this part aimed to address both complementary sides of these Internet phenomena: memes as political forms and politics of memes, while underlying some economic, gendered, affective dimensions which are part of their impact. We then examined the consequences of the notion of “impact” and “politics” for the shaping of an history of memes, which is at stake in the Hivi (A history of online virality) project, we are currently conducting, may it be in terms of sources, methods (“scalable” and “medium” reading), or topics (notably claiming for a study of circulation and flow (Jenkins, 2009), of processes, of participation (Milner, 2018) and appropriation, beyond a sole semiotic approach of memes). References Tina Askanius, Nadine Keller, “Murder fantasies in memes: fascist aesthetics of death threats and the banalization of white supremacist violence”, Information, Communication & Society, 2021, vol. 0, n° 0, p. 1 18. Anastasia Denisova, Internet memes and society: social, cultural, and political contexts, New York, Routledge, 2019. Nicholas A. John, The age of sharing, Cambridge, Polity Press, 2017. Henry Jenkins, If It Doesn’t Spread, It’s Dead (Part One): Media Viruses and Memes, 2009 (http://henryjenkins.org/blog/2009/02/if_it_doesnt_spread_its_dead_p.html). Ryan Milner, The world made meme: Public conversations and participatory media, Cambridge MA, The MIT Press, 2018. Ben Tadayoshi Pettis, “Know your Meme and the Homogeneization of Web History”, Internet Histories, 2021 (to be soon published). Limor Shifman, Memes in digital culture, Cambridge MA, The MIT Press, 2014. Langdon Winner, “Do artifacts have politics ?”, Daedalus, vol. 109, n°1, 1980, p. 121-136. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 50 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSmall languages, education and citizenship: The paradoxical case of Luxembourgish
Horner, Kristine; Weber, Jean-Jacques UL

in International Journal of the Sociology of Language (2010), 205

Detailed reference viewed: 244 (17 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSmall RNA profiling of low biomass samples: identification and removal of contaminants
Heintz-Buschart, Anna; Yusuf, Dilmurat; Kaysen, Anne UL et al

in BMC Biology (2018), 16(52),

Background: Sequencing-based analyses of low-biomass samples are known to be prone to misinterpretation due to the potential presence of contaminating molecules derived from laboratory reagents and ... [more ▼]

Background: Sequencing-based analyses of low-biomass samples are known to be prone to misinterpretation due to the potential presence of contaminating molecules derived from laboratory reagents and environments. DNA contamination has been previously reported, however contamination with RNA is usually considered to be unlikely due to its inherent instability. Small RNAs (sRNAs) identified in tissues and bodily fluids such as blood plasma, have implications for physiology and pathology, and therefore the potential to act as disease biomarkers. Thus, the possibility for RNA contaminants demands a careful evaluation. Results: Here we report the presence of small RNA contaminants in widely used microRNA extraction kits and propose an approach for their depletion. We sequenced sRNAs extracted from human plasma samples and detected important levels of non-human (exogenous) sequences whose source could be traced to the microRNA extraction columns through a careful qPCR-based analysis of several laboratory reagents. Furthermore, we also detected the presence of artefactual sequences related to these contaminants in a range of published datasets, arguing for a re-evaluation of reports suggesting the presence of exogenous RNAs of microbial and dietary origins in blood plasma. To avoid artefacts in future experiments, we also devise several protocols of contaminant RNAs, define minimal amounts of starting material for artefact-free analyses, and confirm the reduction of contaminant levels for identification of bona fide sequences using ‘ultra-clean’ extraction kits. Conclusion: This is the first report of the presence of RNA molecules as contaminants in RNA extraction kits. The described protocols should be applied in the future to avoid confounding sRNA studies. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 227 (27 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailSmall Scale CLTs for the Nodal Length of Monochromatic Waves
Dierickx, Gauthier; Nourdin, Ivan UL; Peccati, Giovanni UL et al

E-print/Working paper (2020)

Detailed reference viewed: 69 (7 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailSmall State, Great Diplomacy: The Role of Luxembourg in the European Integration Process
Danescu, Elena UL

Scientific Conference (2018, March 29)

Luxembourg has a particular geopolitical and historical situation — a small, multicultural and multilingual nation sandwiched between two larger powers, France and Germany, with no central bank or ... [more ▼]

Luxembourg has a particular geopolitical and historical situation — a small, multicultural and multilingual nation sandwiched between two larger powers, France and Germany, with no central bank or national currency. For Luxembourg, adopting an outward orientation had always been a sine qua non. After the second world war the political leaders were convinced of the need to preserve national sovereignty and vital interests by maintaining an international outlook. The European principle of equality among states also guaranteed Luxembourg a role in decision-making and in the leadership of joint organizations. By giving up part of its sovereignty Luxembourg paradoxically actually strengthened its sovereignty. Since then, Luxembourg has played and continues to act as a mediator and a force for ideas at the heart of EU, either as a member State or through some of its leaders. Since the time of Joseph Bech, from Pierre Werner and Gaston Thorn to Jacques Santer and Jean-Claude Juncker more recently, Luxembourg has proved itself to be a master in the art of political consensus and a rich source of leaders who have been able to find a way out of Europe’s successive impasses (among them: the ‘battle of the seats’ of the Community institutions, UK accession, BLEU, Benelux). The influential nature of its leadership gave Luxembourg a role in the European integration process that far outweighed the country’s socio-economic impact [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 208 (11 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSmall State, Large World, Global University: Comparing Ascendant National Universities in Luxemburg and Qatar
Powell, Justin J W UL

in Current Issues in Comparative Education (2012), 15(1), 100-113

Comparing the small states of Luxembourg and Qatar, I analyze their ascendant national universities to find out the extent to which these higher education institutions reflect global norms relating to ... [more ▼]

Comparing the small states of Luxembourg and Qatar, I analyze their ascendant national universities to find out the extent to which these higher education institutions reflect global norms relating to research universities – or the traditions of their host countries. Which characteristics of “world-class” universities exist in the Université du Luxembourg and Qatar University, embedded in two unusual small states that are hyper-diverse culturally and extremely wealthy? Despite significant cultural differences, both Luxembourg and Qatar have compensated perceived vulnerabilities of small states as they invest in national skill formation and the production of knowledge. Although tensions remain regarding the languages of instruction, the international recruitment of scholars and students, and sustainability, these universities are growing in prominence regionally and globally. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 370 (18 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSmall States and the ‘Corona crisis’
Högenauer, Anna-Lena UL; Sarapuu, Külli; Trimikliniotis, Nicos

in Small States & Territories (2021), 4(1),

All papers are available open access on the journal's website.

Detailed reference viewed: 60 (5 UL)
Full Text
See detailSmall States Diplomacy in Action. Luxembourg in the European Integration History
Danescu, Elena UL

Presentation (2022, May 30)

After the Second World War, in line with its new strategic choice Luxembourg resolutely set out on the road to international multilateralism and European integration, being in 1951 one of the six founding ... [more ▼]

After the Second World War, in line with its new strategic choice Luxembourg resolutely set out on the road to international multilateralism and European integration, being in 1951 one of the six founding members of the European Coal and Steel Community (ECSC), and in 1952 - the workplace of the newly established European Community institutions. Since then, Luxembourg has played and continues to act as a mediator and a force for ideas in the EU, either as a member State, or through some of its leaders (including Joseph Bech, Pierre Werner, Gaston Thorn, Jacques Santer, Jean-Claude Juncker). Based on a wide range of sources from public and private archives, this presentation aims to illustrate how the Grand-Duchy had become a master of small states diplomacy and a consensus builder in the European integration history, and to demonstrate that the influential nature if its leadership gave Luxembourg a role that far outweighed the country’s socio-economic impact. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 57 (1 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailSmall States in the European Union : Luxembourg
Danescu, Elena UL

in Hartly, Cathy (Ed.) WESTERN EUROPE 2019 (2018)

Detailed reference viewed: 168 (26 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSmall urban green areas
Picard, Pierre M UL; Tran, Thi Thu Huyen UL

in Journal of Environmental Economics and Management (2021), 106

This paper studies the size and location of small urban green areas across city spaces. Small urban green areas offer amenities that affect residential choices, land consumption and land rent. This paper ... [more ▼]

This paper studies the size and location of small urban green areas across city spaces. Small urban green areas offer amenities that affect residential choices, land consumption and land rent. This paper discusses the land use and locations of those areas and the resulting residential space allocation. It is shown that the land share dedicated to small urban green areas results from the trade-off between land value and population density and is a single peaked function of the distance to the city center. This result is confirmed by the empirical study of urban structures in the 305 largest EU cities using GIS data. This spatial pattern is shown to be robust to many measures of urban land uses. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 40 (1 UL)
See detailThe Small World of Corporate Boards: International Evidence from Listed Firms
Hamadi, Malika; Heinen, Andreas; Jonard, Nicolas UL et al

Scientific Conference (2012, August)

Detailed reference viewed: 43 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSmall-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and spin-echo SANS measurements reveal the logarithmic fractal structure of the large-scale chromatin organization in HeLa nuclei
Iashina, Ekaterina G.; Filatov, Mikhail V.; Pantina, Rimma A. et al

in Journal of Applied Crystallography (2019), 52(4), 844-853

This paper reports on the two-scale fractal structure of chromatin organization in the nucleus of the HeLa cell. Two neutron scattering methods, small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and spin-echo SANS ... [more ▼]

This paper reports on the two-scale fractal structure of chromatin organization in the nucleus of the HeLa cell. Two neutron scattering methods, small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and spin-echo SANS, are used to unambiguously identify the large-scale structure as being a logarithmic fractal with the correlation function $\gamma$( r) $\sim$ ln( r/$\xi$). The smaller-scale structural level is shown to be a volume fractal with dimension D$ F$ = 2.41. By definition, the volume fractal is self-similar at different scales, while the logarithmic fractal is hierarchically changed upon scaling. As a result, the logarithmic fractal is more compact than the volume fractal but still has a rather high surface area, which provides accessibility at all length scales. Apparently such bi-fractal chromatin organization is the result of an evolutionary process of optimizing the compactness and accessibility of gene packing. As they are in a water solution, the HeLa nuclei tend to agglomerate over time. The large-scale logarithmic fractal structure of chromatin provides the HeLa nucleus with the possibility of penetrating deeply into the adjacent nucleus during the agglomeration process. The interpenetration phenomenon of the HeLa nuclei shows that the chromatin-free space of one nucleus is not negligible but is as large as the volume occupied by chromatin itself. It is speculated that it is the logarithmic fractal architecture of chromatin that provides a comfortable compartment for this most important function of the cell. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 112 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSmall-angle neutron scattering by spatially inhomogeneous ferromagnets with a nonzero average uniaxial anisotropy
Zaporozhets, V. D.; Oba, Y.; Michels, Andreas UL et al

in Journal of Applied Crystallography (2022), 55

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (3 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSmall-angle neutron scattering by the magnetic microstructure of nanocrystalline ferromagnets near saturation
Weissmüller, J.; McMichael, R. D.; Michels, Andreas UL et al

in Journal of Research of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (1999), 104(3), 261-275

The paper presents a theoretical analysis of elastic magnetic small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) due to the nonuniform magnetic microstructure in nanocrystalline ferromagnets. The reaction of the ... [more ▼]

The paper presents a theoretical analysis of elastic magnetic small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) due to the nonuniform magnetic microstructure in nanocrystalline ferromagnets. The reaction of the magnetization to the magnetocrystalline and magnetoelastic anisotropy fields is derived using the theory of micromagnetics. In the limit where the scattering volume is a single magnetic domain, and the magnetization is nearly aligned with the direction of the magnetic field, closed form solutions are given for the differential scattering cross-section as a function of the scattering vector and of the magnetic field. These expressions involve an anisotropy field scattering function, that depends only on the Fourier components of the anisotropy field microstructure, not on the applied field, and a micromagnetic response function for SANS, that can be computed from tabulated values of the materials parameters saturation magnetization and exchange stiffness constant or spin wave stiffness constant. Based on these results, it is suggested that the anisotropy field scattering function SH can be extracted from experimental SANS data. A sum rule for SH suggests measurement of the volumetric mean square anisotropy field. When magneto-crystalline anisotropy is dominant, then a mean grain size or the grain size distribution may be determined by analysis of SH. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 98 (3 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSmall-angle neutron scattering correlation functions of bulk magnetic materials
Mettus, Denis UL; Michels, Andreas UL

in Journal of Applied Crystallography (2015), 48

Detailed reference viewed: 179 (8 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe small-angle neutron scattering instrument D33 at the Institut Laue-Langevin
Dewhurst, C. D.; Grillo, I.; Honecker, Dirk UL et al

in JOURNAL OF APPLIED CRYSTALLOGRAPHY (2016), 49

The D33 small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) instrument at the Institut Laue–Langevin (ILL) is the most recent SANS instrument to be built at the ILL. In a project beginning in 2005 and lasting seven ... [more ▼]

The D33 small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) instrument at the Institut Laue–Langevin (ILL) is the most recent SANS instrument to be built at the ILL. In a project beginning in 2005 and lasting seven years, the concept has been developed, and the instrument designed, manufactured and installed. D33 was commissioned with neutrons during the second half of 2012, fully entering the ILL user programme in 2013. The scientific case required that D33 should provide a wide dynamic range of measured scattering vector magnitude q, flexibility with regard to the instrument resolution, and the provision of polarized neutrons and 3He spin analysis to facilitate and expand studies in magnetism. In monochromatic mode, a velocity selector and a flexible system of inter-collimation apertures define the neutron beam. A double-chopper system enables a time-of-flight (TOF) mode of operation, allowing an enhanced dynamic q range (qmax/qmin) and a flexible wavelength resolution. Two large multitube detectors extend the dynamic q range further, giving qmax/qmin ’ 25 in monochromatic mode and a very large qmax/qmin > 1000 in TOF mode. The sample zone is large and flexible in configuration, accommodating complex and bulky sample environments, while the position of D33 is such as to allow high magnetic fields at the sample position. The instrument is of general purpose with a performance rivalling that of D22, and is well adapted for SANS studies in scientific disciplines as diverse as solution scattering in biology and soft matter and studies of physics, materials science and magnetism. This article provides a detailed technical description of D33 and its performance and characterization of the individual components, and serves as a technical reference for users of the instrument. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 51 (2 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSmall-angle neutron scattering modeling of spin disorder in nanoparticles
Vivas, Laura G.; Yanes, Rocio; Michels, Andreas UL

in Scientific Reports (2017), 7

Detailed reference viewed: 120 (4 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSmall-angle neutron scattering of nanocrystalline gadolinium and holmium with random paramagnetic susceptibility
Döbrich, Frank; Bick, Jens-Peter; Birringer, Rainer et al

in Journal of Physics : Condensed Matter (2015), 27

Detailed reference viewed: 206 (5 UL)