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See detailSpecial issue on software verification and testing (editorial message)
Mousavi, MohammadReza; Pang, Jun UL

in Science of Computer Programming (2014), 95(3), 273-274

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See detailSpecial issue: Assessing behavior difficulties in students
Zurbriggen, Carmen UL; Schwab, Susanne; de Boer, Anke et al

in European Journal of Psychological Assessment (2018), 34(2),

Detailed reference viewed: 41 (0 UL)
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See detailSpecial issue: Classroom composition research on social-emotional outcomes
Müller, Christoph Michael; Zurbriggen, Carmen UL

in Journal of Cognitive Education and Psychology (2015), 15(2),

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See detailSpecial Issue: Current Methodological Issues in Educational Large-Scale Assessments – Part I
Stadler, Matthias UL; Krolak-Schwerdt, Sabine UL; Greiff, Samuel UL

in Psychological Test and Assessment Modeling (2016), 58

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See detailSpecial issue: Energy-efficiency in large distributed computing architectures
Dorronsoro, Bernabé; Danoy, Grégoire UL; Bouvry, Pascal UL

in Future Generation Comp. Syst. (2014), 36

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See detailSpecial Issue: Gender and educational achievement
Hadjar, Andreas UL; Krolak-Schwerdt, Sabine UL; Priem, Karin UL et al

in Educational Research (2014), 56(2),

Detailed reference viewed: 151 (5 UL)
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See detailSpecial Issue: Images and Films as Objects to Think With: A Reappraisal of Visual Studies in Histories of Education
Priem, Karin UL; Dussel, Inés

in Paedagogica Historica (2017), 53(6),

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See detailSpecial issue: Integrated approaches to cytoskeleton research
Friederich, Evelyne UL

in Biochimica et Biophysica Acta-Molecular Cell Research (2007), 1773(5), 603

[No abstract available]

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See detailSpecial issue: software verification and testing
Mousavi, Mohammad Reza; Pang, Jun UL

in Innovations in Systems and Software Engineering (2013), 9(2), 57-58

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See detailSpecial Issue: The Dissolution of the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy: Border Making and its Consequences.
Venken, Machteld UL; Bo Frandsen, Steen

in European Review of History (2020), 27(6),

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See detailSpecial Needs
Powell, Justin J W UL

in Fitzpatrick, Tony; Kwon, Huck-ju; Manning, Nick (Eds.) et al International Encyclopedia of Social Policy (2006)

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See detailLa spécialisation linguistique de l 'emploi au Luxembourg étudiée à travers les offres d'emploi (1984-2019) Rapport de synthèse
Pigeron-Piroth, Isabelle UL; Fehlen, Fernand UL

in UniGR_CBS Working Paper (2022), 13

Based on a sample of job advertisements published in the main Luxembourgish daily newspaper (Luxem-burger Wort) covering the period 1984-2019, this study describes the development of language skills re ... [more ▼]

Based on a sample of job advertisements published in the main Luxembourgish daily newspaper (Luxem-burger Wort) covering the period 1984-2019, this study describes the development of language skills re-quired on the Luxembourg job market. After a brief presentation of the linguistic situation and the labor market in Luxembourg, the statistical analysis of a sample of some 8,340 job advertisements constitutes the main part of this publication. A qualitative study of a smaller body of job vacancies sheds additional light and a detailed understanding of linguistic needs in a multilingual and international labor market. Both approaches come to the same conclusion. The labor shortage and particularly the lack of people fluent in the "three languages of the country" has led to a segmentation of the labor market. [less ▲]

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See detailSpecialization of monodromy group and l-independence
Hui, Chun Yin UL

in Comptes Rendus. Mathématique (2012)

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See detailSpecialized Administrative Law of the European Union
Hofmann, Herwig UL; Rowe, Gerard; Türk, Alexander

Book published by Oxford University Pressq - 1st (2018)

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See detailSpecialized international financial centres and their crisis resilience: The case of Luxembourg
Walther, Olivier; Schulz, Christian UL; Dörry, Sabine

in Geographische Zeitschrift (2012), 99(2-3), 123-142

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See detailA Specialized Method to Resolve Fine 3D Features of Astrocytes in Nonhuman Primate (Marmoset, Callithrix jacchus) and Human Fixed Brain Samples.
Quesseveur, Gael; Fouquier d'Hérouël, Aymeric UL; Murai, Keith K. et al

in Methods in Molecular Biology (2019), 1938

Astrocytes are among the most numerous cells in the brain and fulfill diverse functions in homeostasis and regulation of neuronal activity. Astrocytes also dramatically change their properties in response ... [more ▼]

Astrocytes are among the most numerous cells in the brain and fulfill diverse functions in homeostasis and regulation of neuronal activity. Astrocytes also dramatically change their properties in response to brain injury or disease, a process called reactive gliosis. Precisely how astrocytes contribute to healthy brain function and play differential roles in brain pathology and regeneration remain important areas of investigation. To better understand the properties of astrocytes, more sophisticated approaches for probing their rich and complex anatomical and molecular features are needed to fully determine their contribution to brain physiology. Here we present an efficient and straightforward immunolabeling protocol to obtain high-resolution fluorescence-based images from fixed nonhuman primate (common marmoset Callithrix jacchus) and human brain samples. Importantly, the protocol is useful for obtaining images from samples that have been stored in fixative solutions (such as formalin) for years. This approach is especially useful for three-dimensional, multichannel confocal microscopy and can be optimized for super-resolution techniques such as stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy. We also present a strategy for using specific combinations of markers to define the phenotypic variations and cellular/subcellular properties of astrocytes to better predict the function of these cells on their surrounding brain microenvironment. [less ▲]

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See detailSpeciation with gene flow in equids despite extensive chromosomal plasticity.
Jonsson, Hakon; Schubert, Mikkel; Seguin-Orlando, Andaine et al

in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (2014), 111(52), 18655-60

Horses, asses, and zebras belong to a single genus, Equus, which emerged 4.0-4.5 Mya. Although the equine fossil record represents a textbook example of evolution, the succession of events that gave rise ... [more ▼]

Horses, asses, and zebras belong to a single genus, Equus, which emerged 4.0-4.5 Mya. Although the equine fossil record represents a textbook example of evolution, the succession of events that gave rise to the diversity of species existing today remains unclear. Here we present six genomes from each living species of asses and zebras. This completes the set of genomes available for all extant species in the genus, which was hitherto represented only by the horse and the domestic donkey. In addition, we used a museum specimen to characterize the genome of the quagga zebra, which was driven to extinction in the early 1900s. We scan the genomes for lineage-specific adaptations and identify 48 genes that have evolved under positive selection and are involved in olfaction, immune response, development, locomotion, and behavior. Our extensive genome dataset reveals a highly dynamic demographic history with synchronous expansions and collapses on different continents during the last 400 ky after major climatic events. We show that the earliest speciation occurred with gene flow in Northern America, and that the ancestor of present-day asses and zebras dispersed into the Old World 2.1-3.4 Mya. Strikingly, we also find evidence for gene flow involving three contemporary equine species despite chromosomal numbers varying from 16 pairs to 31 pairs. These findings challenge the claim that the accumulation of chromosomal rearrangements drive complete reproductive isolation, and promote equids as a fundamental model for understanding the interplay between chromosomal structure, gene flow, and, ultimately, speciation. [less ▲]

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See detailSpecific activation related to proper name retrieval associated with faces
Dubois, S; Rossion, B; Schiltz, Christine UL et al

Poster (1997, October)

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See detailSpecific language impairment in language minority children from low-income families
Engel de Abreu, Pascale UL; Cruz-Santos, Anabela; Puglisi, Marina

in Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology (2014, May), 56(S3), 7-23

Background: This study seeks to determine whether executive functioning represents an area of difficulty for bilingual children with SLI and if so, which specific executive processes are affected. Methods ... [more ▼]

Background: This study seeks to determine whether executive functioning represents an area of difficulty for bilingual children with SLI and if so, which specific executive processes are affected. Methods: The data from 81 eight-year-olds from the following groups was analyzed: (1) 15 Portuguese-Luxembourgish bilinguals from Luxembourg with an SLI diagnosis; (2) 33 typically developing Portuguese-Luxembourgish bilinguals from Luxembourg; (3) 33 typically developing Portuguese-speaking monolinguals from Portugal. Groups were matched on first language, ethnicity, chronological age, socioeconomic status, and nonverbal intelligence. Children completed tests tapping: expressive and receptive vocabulary, syntactic comprehension, verbal and visuospatial working memory, selective attention and interference suppression. Results: The bilingual SLI group performed equally well to their typically developing peers on measures of visuospatial working memory but had lower scores than both control groups on tasks of verbal working memory. On measures of selective attention and interference suppression, typically developing children who were bilingual outperformed their monolingual counterparts. For selective attention, performance of the bilingual SLI group did not differ significantly from the controls. For interference suppression the bilingual SLI group performed significantly less well than typically developing bilinguals but not monolinguals. Discussion: The study indicates that although bilingual children with SLI do not demonstrate the same advantages in selective attention and interference suppression as typically developing bilinguals, they do not lag behind typically developing monolinguals in these domains of executive functioning. This finding raises the possibility that bilingualism might represent a protective factor against some of the cognitive limitations that are associated with SLI in monolinguals. [less ▲]

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See detailSpecific language impairment in language-minority children from low-income families
Engel de Abreu, Pascale UL; Cruz-Santos, A.; Puglisi, M. L.

in International Journal of Language and Communication Disorders (2014), 49(6), 736-747

Background: Recent evidence suggests that Specific Language Impairment (SLI) might be secondary to general cognitive processing limitations in the domain of executive functioning. Previous research has ... [more ▼]

Background: Recent evidence suggests that Specific Language Impairment (SLI) might be secondary to general cognitive processing limitations in the domain of executive functioning. Previous research has focused almost exclusively on monolingual children with SLI and offers little evidence-based guidance on executive functioning in bilingual children with SLI. Studying bilinguals with SLI is important, especially in the light of increasing evidence that bilingualism can bring advantages in certain domains of executive functioning. Aims: This study seeks to determine whether executive functioning represents an area of difficulty for bilingual language-minority children with SLI and if so, which specific executive processes are affected. Methods and procedures: This cross-cultural research was conducted with bilingual children from Luxembourg and monolingual children from Portugal who all had Portuguese as their first language. The data from 81 eight-year-olds from the following three groups was analyzed: (1) 15 Portuguese-Luxembourgish bilinguals from Luxembourg with an SLI diagnosis; (2) 33 typically developing Portuguese-Luxembourgish bilinguals from Luxembourg; (3) 33 typically developing Portuguese-speaking monolinguals from Portugal. Groups were matched on first language, ethnicity, chronological age and socioeconomic status, and they did not differ in nonverbal intelligence. Children completed a battery of tests tapping: expressive and receptive vocabulary, syntactic comprehension, verbal and visuospatial working memory, selective attention and interference suppression. Results: The bilingual SLI group performed equally well to their typically developing peers on measures of visuospatial working memory but had lower scores than both control groups on tasks of verbal working memory. On measures of selective attention and interference suppression, typically developing children who were bilingual outperformed their monolingual counterparts. For selective attention, performance of the bilingual SLI group did not differ significantly from the controls. For interference suppression the bilingual SLI group performed significantly less well than typically developing bilinguals but not monolinguals. Conclusions and implications: This research provides further support to the position that SLI is not a language-specific disorder. The study indicates that although bilingual children with SLI do not demonstrate the same advantages in selective attention and interference suppression as typically developing bilinguals, they do not lag behind typically developing monolinguals in these domains of executive functioning. This finding raises the possibility that bilingualism might represent a protective factor against some of the cognitive limitations that are associated with SLI in monolinguals. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 669 (27 UL)