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See detailThe Socioeconomic gradient in child health and noncognitive skills: Evidence from the Czech Republic
Borga, Liyousew UL; Munich, Daniel; Kukla, Lubomir

in Economics and Human Biology (2021)

We investigate the presence of a socioeconomic status (SES) gradient in children's health and noncognitive skill development, and its evolution with child age using cohort data from the Czech Republic. We ... [more ▼]

We investigate the presence of a socioeconomic status (SES) gradient in children's health and noncognitive skill development, and its evolution with child age using cohort data from the Czech Republic. We show that family SES are positively associated with better child health. These effects start to emerge at age 3 and are persistent for all subsequent ages. We find a modest strengthening of the gradient as the children grow older. Similarly, at the lowest distribution of average family income, children lag in their noncognitive skills. We find evidence that children enter school with substantial differences in noncognitive skill endowments based on family SES. This correlation persists when controlling for poor health at birth, the roles of specific and chronic health problems, housing conditions, and partner characteristics. Maternal health status explains some of the association between family income and child noncognitive skills. We account for the endogeniety of SES and non-linearities in measures. [less ▲]

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See detailSocioeconomic hierarchy and health gradient in Europe: The role of income inequality and of social origins
Chauvel, Louis UL; Leist, Anja UL

in International Journal for Equity in Health (2015), 14(132), 1-12

Introduction. Health inequalities reflect multidimensional inequality (income, education, and other indicators of socioeconomic position) and vary across countries and welfare regimes. To which extent ... [more ▼]

Introduction. Health inequalities reflect multidimensional inequality (income, education, and other indicators of socioeconomic position) and vary across countries and welfare regimes. To which extent there is intergenerational transmission of health via parental socioeconomic status has rarely been investigated in comparative perspective. The study sought to explore if different measures of stratification produce the same health gradient and to which extent health gradients of income and of social origins vary with level of living and income inequality. Method. A total of 299,770 observations were available from 18 countries assessed in EU-SILC 2005 and 2011 data, which contain information on social origins. Income inequality (Gini) and level of living were calculated from EU-SILC. Logit rank transformation provided normalized inequalities and distributions of income and social origins up to the extremes of the distribution and was used to investigate net comparable health gradients in detail. Multilevel random-slope models were run to post-estimate best linear unbiased predictors (BLUPs) and related standard deviations of residual intercepts (median health) and slopes (income-health gradients) per country and survey year. Results. Health gradients varied across different measures of stratification, with origins and income producing significant slopes after controls. Income inequality was associated with worse average health, but income inequality and steepness of the health gradient were only marginally associated. Discussion. Linear health gradients suggest gains in health per rank of income and of origins even at the very extremes of the distribution. Intergenerational transmission of status gains in importance in countries with higher income inequality. Countries differ in the association of income inequality and income-related health gradient, and low income inequality may mask health problems of vulnerable individuals with low status. Not only income inequality, but other country characteristics such as familial orientation play a considerable role in explaining steepness of the health gradient. [less ▲]

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See detailSocioeconomic inequalities in fatal opiate and cocaine related overdoses: Transgenerational baggage versus individual attainments
Origer, Alain UL; Bucki, Barbara UL; Baumann, Michèle UL

in European Health Psychologist (2014)

Background. To determine socioeconomic inequalities in opiates and cocaine related Fatal OverDose (FOD) cases and their implications in terms of preventive measures. Methods. Cross-examination of law ... [more ▼]

Background. To determine socioeconomic inequalities in opiates and cocaine related Fatal OverDose (FOD) cases and their implications in terms of preventive measures. Methods. Cross-examination of law enforcement and healthcare data sources and of forensic evidence in a nested case-control study design. FOD cases were individually matched with 4 controls, according to sex, year of birth, drug administration route and duration of drug use. 272 cases vs. 1,056 controls were compared through conditional logistic regression. Findings. Being professionally active [OR=0.662 (95% CI 0.446–0.985)], reporting salary as main income source [OR=0.417 (95% CI 0.258–0.674)], and education attainment higher than primary school [OR=0.501 (95% CI 0.344-0.729)] revealed to be protective factors, whereas parental professional status was not associated to FOD. Discussion. Compared to their peers, drug users with lower socioeconomic profiles show increased odds of FOD. However, actual and self-referred socioeconomic characteristics of drug users, impacting on daily life quality, such as educational attainment, employment and revenue, appeared to be more predictive of FOD than transgenerational factors such as the parental socioeconomic status. Thus, motivational interventions aimed at socio-professional reintegration should be given due attention in dedicated harm prevention policies. [less ▲]

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See detailSocioeconomic inequalities in health of older Europeans - exploring the contribution of childhood conditions
Leist, Anja UL; Avendano, Mauricio; Mackenbach, Johan P.

Scientific Conference (2013, November)

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See detailSocioeconomic inequities patterns of multi-morbidity in early adolescence.
Chau, Kénora; Baumann, Michèle UL

in International Journal for Equity in Health (2013), 12

Background: Multi-morbidity such as cumulating mental health, behavioral, and school difficulties (consumptions of alcohol, tobacco, cannabis, and hard drugs, obesity, depressive symptoms, suicide ... [more ▼]

Background: Multi-morbidity such as cumulating mental health, behavioral, and school difficulties (consumptions of alcohol, tobacco, cannabis, and hard drugs, obesity, depressive symptoms, suicide attempts, involvement in violence, and low school performance) is common in early adolescence and can be favored by a number of socioeconomic factors (gender, age, nationality, family structure, parents’ education, father’ occupation, and income). This study assessed the concurrent roles of various socioeconomic factors in multi-morbidity defined as cumulated number of difficulties (CD) which has been partially documented. Methods: Adolescents from middle schools in north-eastern France (N = 1,559) completed a questionnaire measuring socioeconomic characteristics and mental health, behavioral, and school difficulties. Data were analyzed using logistic regression models. Results: Alcohol use affected 35.2% of subjects, tobacco use 11.2%, cannabis use 5.6%, hard drugs use 2.8%, obesity 10.6%, depressive symptoms 13.3%, suicide attempts 9.9%, involvement in violence 10.3%, and low school performance 8.2%. Insufficient income and non-intact families impacted most mental health, behavioral, and school difficulties with adjusted odds ratios (ORa) between 1.51 and 3.72. Being immigrant impacted illicit drugs use and low school performance (ORa 2.31-4.14); low parents’ education depressive symptoms (1.42) and school performance (3.32); and manual-worker/inactive offspring low school performance (2.56-3.05). Multi-morbidity was very common: CD0 44.1%, CD1 30.8%, CD2-3 18.4%, and CD ≥ 4 6.7%. Insufficient income, divorced/separated parents, reconstructed families, and single parents played impressive roles with strong ORa gradients (reaching 4.86) from CD1 to CD ≥ 4. Being European immigrant, low parents’ education, and low fathers’ occupations had significant gender-age-adjusted odds ratios for CD2-3 and CD ≥ 4, but these became non-significant when adjusted for all socioeconomic factors. Older adolescents had higher risks for multi-morbidity which did not change when adjusting for all socioeconomic factors. Conclusions: Multi-morbidity including a wide range of mental health, behavioral, and school difficulties was common in early adolescence. Insufficient income and non-intact families played impressive roles. Being immigrant, low parents’ education, and low fathers’ occupations also played strong roles but these were explained by insufficient income and non-intact families. Prevention against multi-morbidity should be designed to help adolescents to solve their difficulties, especially among adolescents with socioeconomic difficulties. [less ▲]

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See detailSOCIOECONOMIC PROFILES OF CROSS-BORDER COMMUTERS AT THE FRENCH BORDERS: common features and territorial specificities
Pigeron-Piroth, Isabelle UL; Belkacem, Rachid

in Borders in Perspective (2020), 3

This study proposes to shed light on the main aspects of the socio-professional profiles of cross-border commuters at the various French borders. Nearly 385,000 cross-border commuters were living in ... [more ▼]

This study proposes to shed light on the main aspects of the socio-professional profiles of cross-border commuters at the various French borders. Nearly 385,000 cross-border commuters were living in France in 2013. The destination countries of these cross-border commuters are very diverse (mainly Switzerland and Luxembourg). There is a relative territorial specificity of the socio-professional profiles according to the different areas of employment. Cross-border work is a regulatory factor in the different cross-border labor markets, allowing for a quantitative but also qualitative adjustment between reserves and man-power needs. This analysis will thus provide a better understanding of cross-border mobility and, above all, identify their different socioeconomic functions with regard to the countries of destination. For this purpose, we have made use of the 2013 INSEE population census data. [less ▲]

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See detailSocioeconomic status amplifies genetic effects in middle childhood in a large German twin sample
Gottschling, Juliana UL; Hahn, E.; Beam, C.R. et al

in Intelligence (2019), 72

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See detailSociographie des associations islamiques au Luxembourg, à l'aune de l'institutionnalisation
Pirenne, Elsa

Doctoral thesis (2019)

Detailed reference viewed: 194 (36 UL)
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See detailA sociolinguistic profile of The Gambia
Juffermans, Kasper UL; McGlynn, Caroline

in Sociolinguistic Studies = Estudios de Sociolingüística (2009), 3(3), 329-355

This paper outlines the sociolinguistic situation in the smallest country of mainland Africa, The Gambia. Very little has been published about the languages and sociolinguistic situation in The Gambia and ... [more ▼]

This paper outlines the sociolinguistic situation in the smallest country of mainland Africa, The Gambia. Very little has been published about the languages and sociolinguistic situation in The Gambia and it was upon discovering this dearth of reliable published sources that led the authors to pool knowledge garnered during independent doctoral research. In this paper we have coupled language shift with a detailed description of the dynamic sociolinguistic profile of The Gambia and trust that it contributes to an understanding of changing ecologies of language in West Africa. Following a portrayal of the indigenous and exogenous languages of The Gambia, with attention to hybrid, overlapping and shifting ethnolinguistic identities, the role of language in several social institutions in a changing society is identified and discussed. The paper culminates in a discussion of linguistic and cultural diversity and appeals for more research in this sociolinguistically unexposed country. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 152 (1 UL)
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See detailSociologie politique de l'eurocratie
Poirier, Philippe UL

in Michon, Sébastien (Ed.) Les équipes parlementaires des eurodéputés. Entreprises politiques et rites d'institution (2014)

Cet ouvrage aborde le processus de rationalisation et d’institutionnalisation du travail politique au niveau européen à partir d’une enquête sociologique dans les coulisses du Parlement européen sur les ... [more ▼]

Cet ouvrage aborde le processus de rationalisation et d’institutionnalisation du travail politique au niveau européen à partir d’une enquête sociologique dans les coulisses du Parlement européen sur les équipes parlementaires des eurodéputés. [less ▲]

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See detailThe sociology of education as the history of the present: Fabrication, difference and abjection
Popkewitz, Thomas S. UL

in Discourse: Studies in the Cultural Politics of Education (2013), 34(3), 439-456

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See detailSociology, Risk and the Environment: A Material-Semiotic Approach
Wong, Catherine UL; Lockie, Stewart

in Journal of Risk Research (2018)

Sociology has made significant contributions to the conceptualisation of risk and critique of technical risk analysis. It has, however, unintentionally reinforced the division of labour between the ... [more ▼]

Sociology has made significant contributions to the conceptualisation of risk and critique of technical risk analysis. It has, however, unintentionally reinforced the division of labour between the natural/technical and social sciences in risk analysis. This paper argues that the problem with conceptualisations of risk is not a misplaced emphasis on calculation. Rather, it is that we have not adequately dealt with ontological distinctions implicit in both sociological and technical work on risk between material or objective risks and our socially-mediated understandings and interpretations of those risks. While acknowledging that risks are simultaneously social and technical, sociologists have not, in practice, provided the conceptual and methodological tools to apprehend risk in a less dualistic manner. This limits our ability both to analyse actors and processes outside the social domain and to explore the recursive relationships between risk calculus, social action and the material outcomes of risk. In response, this paper develops a material-semiotic conceptualisation of risk and provides an assessment of its relevance to more sociologically-informed risk governance. It introduces the ideas of co-constitution, emergent entities and enactment as instruments for reconciling the material and social worlds in a sociological study of risk. It further illustrates the application of a material-semiotic approach using these concepts in the nuclear industry. In deconstructing social-material dualisms in the sociology of risk, this paper argues that a material-semiotic conceptualisation of risk enables both technical and social perspectives on risk not only to co-exist but to collaborate, widening the scope for interdisciplinary research. [less ▲]

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See detailSocioprofessional and psychological variables that predict job finding
Meyers, Raymond UL; Houssemand, Claude UL

in European Review of Applied Psychology (2010), 60(3), 201-219

The predictive power of socioprofessional and psychological variables on job finding was investigated with a cohort of 384 unemployed people in Luxembourg. The aimwas to assess whether, in statistical ... [more ▼]

The predictive power of socioprofessional and psychological variables on job finding was investigated with a cohort of 384 unemployed people in Luxembourg. The aimwas to assess whether, in statistical profiling, some psychological variables have incremental validity over and above the more commonly used socioprofessional dimensions. For the period from 0 to 6 months and the period from 0 to 12 months, socioprofessional variables measured at the beginning of the unemployment period, allowed classification of three quarters of the subjects. Adding significant psychological dimensions did not improve the prediction in either case. Further analysis was done on persons still unemployed at 6 months (i.e. those who found it more difficult to find a job). For the period from 6 to 12 months, age and sex allowed correct classification of 62.6% of the subjects. Adding five psychological variables (openness, self-efficacy, social anxiety, symptom reduction coping, intelligence) significantly improves this percentage by 12.1 points. In the proposed model, psychological factors therefore only play a role in job finding for unemployed people who have more difficulty in finding a job. Results are discussed in terms of labour market mechanisms. © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailSOCS-mediated downregulation of mutant Jak2 (V617F, T875N and K539L) counteracts cytokine-independent signaling.
Haan, Serge UL; Wuller, S.; Kaczor, Jakub UL et al

in Oncogene (2009), 28(34), 3069-80

Recently, mutations in the gene of Janus kinase 2 (Jak2) were discovered in patients suffering from chronic myeloproliferative disorders (MPD) and leukemia. As suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS ... [more ▼]

Recently, mutations in the gene of Janus kinase 2 (Jak2) were discovered in patients suffering from chronic myeloproliferative disorders (MPD) and leukemia. As suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins are potent feedback inhibitors of Jak-mediated signaling, we investigated their role in signal transduction through constitutively active Jak2 mutants. We selected two mutants, Jak2-V617F and Jak2-K539L, found in patients with MPDs and Jak2-T875N identified in acute megakaryoblastic leukemia. We found SOCS family members to be induced through Jak2-V617F in human leukemia cell lines expressing the mutant allele and in stable HEK transfectants inducibly expressing constitutively active Jak2 mutants. SOCS proteins were recruited to the membrane and bound to the constitutively active Jaks. In contrast to wild-type Jak2, the mutant proteins were constitutively ubiquitinated and degraded through the proteasome. Taken together, we show a SOCS-mediated downregulation of the constitutively active, disease-associated mutant Jak2 proteins. Furthermore, a threshold level of mutant Jak expression has to be overcome to allow full cytokine-independent constitutive activation of signaling proteins, which may explain progression to homozygocity in MPDs as well as gene amplification in severe phenotypes and leukemia. [less ▲]

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See detailSOCS2: physiological and pathological functions.
Letellier, Elisabeth UL; Haan, Serge UL

in Frontiers in Bioscience (Elite Edition) (2016), 8

Suppressors of cytokine signalling (SOCS) proteins are modulators of cytokine and growth factor signalling whose aberrant regulation has been linked to a variety of inflammatory and neoplastic diseases ... [more ▼]

Suppressors of cytokine signalling (SOCS) proteins are modulators of cytokine and growth factor signalling whose aberrant regulation has been linked to a variety of inflammatory and neoplastic diseases. SOCS proteins are able to act as substrate-recruiting component of E3-ubiquitin ligase complexes and target interacting proteins for degradation. At least some of the family members can also directly inhibit tyrosine kinases such as Janus Kinases (JAK). The most studied family members, CIS, SOCS1, SOCS2 and SOCS3 are important regulators of the JAK-STAT pathway. Here, we focus on SOCS2 and review its biological function as well as its implication in pathological processes. Furthermore, we take advantage of the known crystal structures of SOCS2 to discuss the potential effects of a selection of SOCS2 mutations that were identified in tumour tissues. [less ▲]

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See detailSOCS3 exerts its inhibitory function on interleukin-6 signal transduction through the SHP2 recruitment site of gp130.
Schmitz, J.; Weissenbach, M.; Haan, Serge UL et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2000), 275(17), 12848-56

Interleukin-6 is involved in the regulation of many biological activities such as gene expression, cell proliferation, and differentiation. The control of the termination of cytokine signaling is as ... [more ▼]

Interleukin-6 is involved in the regulation of many biological activities such as gene expression, cell proliferation, and differentiation. The control of the termination of cytokine signaling is as important as the regulation of initiation of signal transduction pathways. Three families of proteins involved in the down-regulation of cytokine signaling have been described recently: (i) SH2 domain-containing protein-tyrosine phosphatases (SHP), (ii) suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS), and (iii) protein inhibitors of activated STATs (PIAS). We have analyzed the interplay of two inhibitors in the signal transduction pathway of interleukin-6 and demonstrate that the tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 and SOCS3 do not act independently but are functionally linked. The activation of one inhibitor modulates the activity of the other; Inhibition of SHP2 activation leads to increased SOCS3-mRNA levels, whereas increased expression of SOCS3 results in a reduction of SHP2 phosphorylation after activation of the interleukin-6 signal transduction pathway. Furthermore, we show that tyrosine 759 in gp130 is essential for both SHP2 and SOCS3 but not for SOCS1 to exert their inhibitory activities on interleukin-6 signal transduction. Besides SHP2, SOCS3 also interacts with the Tyr(P)-759 peptide of gp130. Taken together, our results suggest differences in the function of SOCS1 and SOCS3 and a link between SHP2 and SOCS3. [less ▲]

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See detailSodium butyrate improves memory function in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model when administered at an advanced stage of disease progression
Govindarajan, Nambirajan; Agis-Balboa, Roberto Carlos; Walter, Jonas UL et al

in Journal of Alzheimer's Disease (2011), 26(1), 187-197

Dysregulation of histone acetylation has been implicated in the onset of age-associated memory impairment and the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. Elevation of histone acetylation via ... [more ▼]

Dysregulation of histone acetylation has been implicated in the onset of age-associated memory impairment and the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. Elevation of histone acetylation via administration of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors is currently being pursued as a novel therapeutic avenue to treat memory impairment linked to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we show that severe amyloid pathology correlates with a pronounced dysregulation of histone acetylation in the forebrain of APPPS1-21 mice. Importantly, prolonged treatment with the pan-HDAC inhibitor sodium butyrate improved associative memory in APPPS1-21 mice even when administered at a very advanced stage of pathology. The recovery of memory function correlated with elevated hippocampal histone acetylation and increased expression of genes implicated in associative learning. These data advance our understanding of the potential applicability of HDAC inhibitors for the treatment of AD and suggest that HDAC inhibitors may have beneficial effects even when administered long after the onset of disease-associated symptoms. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 203 (6 UL)