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Full Text
See detailTransition to the non-academic workforce
Blessing, Lucienne UL

in Kent, Julia; Remington, J (Eds.) Graduate Education for Global Career Pathways (2013)

Doctoral education is about knowledge creation as much as producing a highly qualified workforce on an increasingly global market. Career development, other than for an academic career, has thus far ... [more ▼]

Doctoral education is about knowledge creation as much as producing a highly qualified workforce on an increasingly global market. Career development, other than for an academic career, has thus far received little attention. With an increasingly global competition and workforce, and an increasing number of doctoral candidates, the question is whether and how we should prepare doctoral candidates to move successfully to the workforce, taking into account the wide variety of careers. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 146 (22 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailTransition vers le numérique : Quelles implications pour l’évaluation des élèves et leurs apprentissages ?
Rocher, Thierry; Fischbach, Antoine UL; Klausing, Andreas et al

Scientific Conference (2016, January)

Detailed reference viewed: 197 (23 UL)
See detailLes transitions : tensions entre éducation, formation et emplois
Houssemand, Claude UL

Scientific Conference (2009, April)

Detailed reference viewed: 35 (3 UL)
See detailTransitions and learning through the lifecourse
Ecclestone, K.; Biesta, Gert UL; Hughes, M.

Book published by Routledge (2010)

Detailed reference viewed: 103 (0 UL)
See detailTransitions from Education to Employment in Switzerland
Samuel, Robin UL

Presentation (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (2 UL)
See detailTransitions in the lifecourse: The role of identity, agency and structure.
Ecclestone,K.; Biesta, Gert UL; Hughes,M.

in Ecclestone, K.; Biesta, Gert; Hughes, M (Eds.) Transitions and learning through the lifecourse (2010)

Detailed reference viewed: 207 (0 UL)
See detailTransitions Through The Labor Market: Work, Occupation, Earnings and Retirement
Polachek, Solomon; Tatsiramos, Konstantinos UL

Book published by Emerald (2018)

Detailed reference viewed: 72 (4 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailTransitively Consistent and Unbiased Multi-Image Registration Using Numerically Stable Transformation Synchronisation
Bernard, Florian UL; Thunberg, Johan UL; Salamanca Mino, Luis UL et al

in MIDAS Journal (2015)

Abstract. Transitive consistency of pairwise transformations is a desir- able property of groupwise image registration procedures. The transfor- mation synchronisation method [4] is able to retrieve ... [more ▼]

Abstract. Transitive consistency of pairwise transformations is a desir- able property of groupwise image registration procedures. The transfor- mation synchronisation method [4] is able to retrieve transitively con- sistent pairwise transformations from pairwise transformations that are initially not transitively consistent. In the present paper, we present a numerically stable implementation of the transformation synchronisa- tion method for a ne transformations, which can deal with very large translations, such as those occurring in medical images where the coor- dinate origins may be far away from each other. By using this method in conjunction with any pairwise (a ne) image registration algorithm, a transitively consistent and unbiased groupwise image registration can be achieved. Experiments involving the average template generation from 3D brain images demonstrate that the method is more robust with re- spect to outliers and achieves higher registration accuracy compared to reference-based registration. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 151 (21 UL)
See detailTransitraum Text. Joseph Roths "Hiob"
Heimböckel, Dieter UL

in Ernst, Thomas; Mein, Georg (Eds.) Literatur als Interdiskurs. Realismus und Normalismus, Interkulturalität und Intermedialität von der Moderne bis zur Gegenwart. Eine Festschrift für Rolf Parr zum 60. Geburtstag (2016)

Detailed reference viewed: 101 (0 UL)
See detailTranskription und Edition von „Anna Pestalozzis Tagebuch“, sowie Erstellung des textkritischen Kommentars und der Sacherklärungen
Tröhler, Daniel UL

in Hager, Fritz-Peter (Ed.) Anna Pestalozzis Tagebuch / Käte Silber: Anna Pestalozzi und der Frauenkreis um Pestalozzi (1993)

Detailed reference viewed: 55 (0 UL)
See detailTRANSLA results 2019-2020
Aleksic, Gabrijela UL; Bebić, Džoen Dominique UL

Presentation (2021, February 26)

This was a teacher-parent Conference in which we presented the results on the effects of the translanguaging training for teachers on their pedagogy, home-school collaboration, and children's well being ... [more ▼]

This was a teacher-parent Conference in which we presented the results on the effects of the translanguaging training for teachers on their pedagogy, home-school collaboration, and children's well being. We presented the results gathered from teacher questionnaires, focus groups, and interviews with the teachers, questionnaires and interviews with the parents, and literacy and numeracy tests and video observations with the children. We found positive effects and shared it with parents and teachers. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (2 UL)
See detailTranslanguaging and Linguistic Creativity and Criticality
Aleksic, Gabrijela UL

Presentation (2018, May 25)

Translanguaging (TL) pedagogy is the strategic deployment of the entire linguistic and non-linguistic repertoire for learning and teaching (García & Seltzer 2016). Particular educational advantages of ... [more ▼]

Translanguaging (TL) pedagogy is the strategic deployment of the entire linguistic and non-linguistic repertoire for learning and teaching (García & Seltzer 2016). Particular educational advantages of translanguaging are: (1) deeper and fuller understanding of the subject matter, (2) helps the development of the weaker language, (3) facilitates home-school links and cooperation, and (4) helps the integration of fluent speakers with early learners (García & Li Wei 2014, p. 67). TL is transformative for the child, for the teacher and the whole education. TL space develops the sense of connectedness (Li Wei 2011b) which is important for children's cognitive, linguistic, and socio-emotional development. By the use of the whole linguistic repertoire children can develop criticality and creativity. According to García and Li Wei (2014), creativity is "pushing and breaking the boundaries between the old and the new, the conventional and the original, and the acceptable and the challenging". (p. 67) while criticality is "the ability to use available evidence appropriately, systematically and insightfully, to inform considered views of cultural, social, political and linguistic wisdom, to question and problematize received wisdom and to express views adequately through reasoned responses to situations" (p. 67). The development of creativity and criticality are important skills for children's education and translanguaging pedagogy creates space for the development of these skills. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 106 (2 UL)
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See detailTranslanguaging as a motor for the development of oral skills in early childhood
García, Ofelia; Panagiotopoulou, Argyoro; Kirsch, Claudine UL

Scientific Conference (2016, February 18)

Prof. García, Prof. Panagiotopoulou et Ass. Prof. Kirsch présentent le potentiel de translanguaging pour le développement du multilinguisme des enfants entre 3 à 8 ans. Prof. García explique d’abord le ... [more ▼]

Prof. García, Prof. Panagiotopoulou et Ass. Prof. Kirsch présentent le potentiel de translanguaging pour le développement du multilinguisme des enfants entre 3 à 8 ans. Prof. García explique d’abord le concept du translanguaging et les trois chercheuses l’illustrent ensuite avec des exemples provenant du domaine éducatif formel et non-formel de différents pays. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 253 (12 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailTranslanguaging as a pedagogy, a practice or a strategy? Examples from a preschool and a primary school class in Luxembourg
Kirsch, Claudine UL; Degano, Sarah UL; Mortini, Simone UL

Scientific Conference (2019, July 01)

The concept of translanguaging has been continuously redefined in education, psycholinguistics and sociolinguistics, which has led to some loss of meaning. Regarding teacher translanguaging, studies show ... [more ▼]

The concept of translanguaging has been continuously redefined in education, psycholinguistics and sociolinguistics, which has led to some loss of meaning. Regarding teacher translanguaging, studies show that it has been used as a strategy to further comprehension and learning, and as a pedagogy. The latter recognizes the existence of multiple languages in class and leverages the students’ semiotic system to make meaning and learn (García et al. 2017). Translanguaging has thereby been understood either as a resource-oriented pedagogy that challenges traditional conceptualizations of bilingualism and language learning, or as a pedagogy that fights social inequalities. Most research studies adopt the first view (Poza, 2017). The present paper combines two longitudinal doctoral studies and investigates the ways in which a preschool and a primary school teacher use translanguaging in their classes in Luxembourg. Drawing on interviews and observations, the findings show that the preschool teacher implemented a translanguaging pedagogy. She planned for the use of several languages, opened translanguaging spaces, and systematically translanguaged where she believed it would support learning (Kirsch et al. submitted). By contrast, the primary school teacher used translanguaging as a pedagogical strategy. She used the curricular languages and only translanguaged to support particular students. These differences are explained by the curriculum and the preschool teacher’s attendance of a professional development course. The findings contribute to our understanding of possible ways of implementing translanguaging as a pedagogy. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 157 (18 UL)
See detailTranslanguaging at Primary School: A longitudinal study on the language practices of a newly-arrived 4th-grader
Degano, Sarah UL

Presentation (2019, September 03)

Migration flows of the 21st century have led to increasingly multilingual societies and schools. To engage with this ever-evolving multilingualism, students need to develop linguistic repertoires they can ... [more ▼]

Migration flows of the 21st century have led to increasingly multilingual societies and schools. To engage with this ever-evolving multilingualism, students need to develop linguistic repertoires they can use flexibly and strategically. However, not all the resources of their linguistic repertoires are equally valued as language policies tend to exclusively support standard majority language(s). This unequal support translates into low achievement levels among linguistic minority students (Lewis, Jones and Baker 2012) and the reification of social stratification. A growing body of scholars promote flexible multilingual pedagogies that capitalize on students’ linguistic resources with the aim of providing a more equitable access to the curriculum (García and Flores 2012, Weber 2014). Translanguaging, the deployment of a speaker’s full linguistic repertoire (Otheguy et al. 2015), is a pillar of these pedagogies. Although debated in recent years (Hamman 2017, Jaspers 2018), research in bi- and trilingual schools has shown that translanguaging can increase participation (Kirsch 2017), understanding (Baker and Wright 2017) and identity development (García 2009). Yet, research on translanguaging including migrant languages in multilingual schools remains scarce (Duarte 2018, Rosiers 2018). The present doctoral project investigates the translanguaging practices of students with different language and migration backgrounds in multilingual Luxembourg. As the country with the highest percentage of immigrants in Europe (Eurostat 2018), Luxembourg has a highly diverse linguistic landscape. This diversity is reflected in the education system, where more than 60% of the students indicate having a dominant language other than Luxembourgish (MENJE 2018), with Portuguese being the most used. Not only is the education system characterized by its linguistic diversity, it also is trilingual in French, Luxembourgish and German, the latter being the main medium of instruction in primary school. Accounting for 40.5% of all curricular time, language instruction leaves little room for other linguistic resources; migrant students’ home languages are largely ignored (Horner and Weber 2018) and teachers widely draw on translanguaging practices that are restricted to shifts into Luxembourgish, a Germanic language (Weber 2014). Luxembourg’s education system fails to provide access to the curriculum for migrant students with a Romance-language background. By contrast, recent studies (Kirsch 2017) have shown that in some Luxembourgish preschool, Year 1 and Year 2 classes, teachers have begun to encourage the deployment of the students’ entire linguistic repertoires. Little attention has, however, been paid to the later years of primary school where the achievement levels of students with a migration background are at their lowest (MENJE 2017). This study targets Year 4. It explores the flexible language use of 4thgraders in different school subjects and the development of their language practices across Years 4 and 5. The present paper is based on one of the three investigated schools and focusses on the classroom interactions of an 11-year-old newly arrived student with a Portuguese background. The following research questions underpin the paper: - In what ways and to what extent does a newcomer deploy his semiotic repertoire while interacting with his peers and this teacher? - In what ways and to what extent do his language practices differ across Year 4 and Year 5? The findings contribute to the understanding of multilingual students’ language practices and their development; provide insight into how linguistic repertoires of students with a Romance-language background can be capitalized on; and help denaturalize the ‘student with a migration background - stereotype’ by shedding light on the importance of translanguaging practices in short-cutting gatekeeping mechanisms that restrict access to educational opportunities for more than 20% of the school population (Horner and Weber 2018). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 105 (7 UL)
See detailTranslanguaging at school: students’ perspectives on using multiple languages
Degano, Sarah UL

Presentation (2020, September 25)

Numerous scholars advocate for translanguaging pedagogies to increase participation and learning opportunities for all students, in particular students with a migration background (Rosiers, Van Lancker ... [more ▼]

Numerous scholars advocate for translanguaging pedagogies to increase participation and learning opportunities for all students, in particular students with a migration background (Rosiers, Van Lancker, & Delarue, 2018). Conversely, critics argue that translanguaging can contribute to reiterate unequal participation dynamics and question the equitable access to curricular resources (Hamman, 2018). While most qualitative studies draw on observations of classroom practices of the teachers and/or the students, only few consider the students’ perspectives on these practices. The present paper aims to address this issue. While my doctoral project explores the translanguaging practices of four fourth-graders of different backgrounds and their development over time, this paper investigates their perspectives on translanguaging. From January to December 2018, I observed the students’ interactions with their peers and teachers in Years 4 and 5 and identified and recorded key events. Subsequently, selected events were shown to and discussed with the students. Findings based on recordings from discussions and stimulated recall interviews revealed, first, that translanguaging was the default mode of communication of all four students and was perceived as a common practice. Second, the newcomers reported that they translanguaged to communicate quicker and that translanguaging was particularly frequent in students who were not yet proficient language users. Similarly, students with more experience in the education system perceived translanguaging as an inferior practice and indicated using their home language as a scaffold with other students, but not with their teachers. The students’ self-monitoring connects to the classroom practices. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 69 (2 UL)
Full Text
See detailTranslanguaging course for preschool teachers to disrupt inequalities
Aleksic, Gabrijela UL; Bebić, Džoen Dominique UL

Presentation (2020, November 12)

The highly linguistically and culturally diverse reality of Luxembourg and its school system pose a great challenge to students, families, and teachers alike. This reality tends to produce one of the ... [more ▼]

The highly linguistically and culturally diverse reality of Luxembourg and its school system pose a great challenge to students, families, and teachers alike. This reality tends to produce one of the largest differences in reading performance between Luxembourgish and language minority children compared to other countries (PISA, 2019), which creates inequalities in students’ academic trajectory. Translanguaging as a pedagogy has been established to overcome these inequalities by disrupting language hierarchies and giving language minority children a space and voice to learn and prosper (García, 2019). To address the inequalities and help implement a translanguaging pedagogy in preschool, our project : (1) offered a professional development course in translanguaging to 40 teachers, (2) involves children’s parents to foster home-school collaboration through questionnaires and interviews, and (3) cultivates children’s linguistic, cognitive, and socio-emotional engagement in the classroom through linguistic tests and video observations. We also used focus groups and questionnaires at the beginning and the end of the course. The 18-hour course in Translanguaging (June to December 2019) aimed to challenge the teachers’ perception about multilingualism and equality in their classroom. Through the preliminary results of the focus groups, questionnaires and field notes, we were able to observe some positive changes in the teachers’ attitudes and beliefs about their language minority children such as realizing that language is a tool of communication. Teachers were also more positive about home-school collaboration. However, despite our continuous creative efforts, some teachers still maintained their traditional monolingual stance and conviction of parents’ lack of education and interest. Most of the teachers did, however, not completely overcome a monolingual bias and this remains our main focus in the remaining points and follow-ups of our project. References García, O. (2019). Translanguaging: a coda to the code?, Classroom Discourse, 10(3-4), 369-373, doi: 10.1080/19463014.2019.1638277 OECD (2019). PISA 2018 Results (Volume I): What students know and can do. PISA, OECD Publishing: Paris. doi: https://doi.org/10.1787/5f07c754-en [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 54 (2 UL)