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See detailThinking in action: Need for Cognition predicts Self-Control together with Action Orientation
Grass, Julia; Krieger, Florian UL; Paulus, Philipp et al

in PLoS ONE (2019), 14(8),

Detailed reference viewed: 55 (2 UL)
See detailThird AIDP Symposium for Young Penalists
Lamberigts, Stijn UL

in Brodowski, Espinoza de los Monteros de la Parra, Tiedemann, Vogel, Dominik, Manuel, Klaus, Joachim (Ed.) Regulating Corporate Criminal Liability (2014)

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See detailThird-country National Labour Workers' Mobility to and inside Europe during the COVID-19 Pandemic
Nienaber, Birte UL; Sommarribas, Adolfo UL

Scientific Conference (2021, April 15)

This presentation analyses the situation generated by the Covid-19 pandemic crisis regarding border closures and the reintroduction of temporary border controls at the internal borders in the EU and the ... [more ▼]

This presentation analyses the situation generated by the Covid-19 pandemic crisis regarding border closures and the reintroduction of temporary border controls at the internal borders in the EU and the impact that this border closures and the pandemic had on third-country nationals living or visiting the European Union. [less ▲]

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See detailThird-order effect in magnetic small-angle neutron scattering by a spatially inhomogeneous medium
Metlov, K.L.; Michels, Andreas UL

in Physical Review. B, Condensed Matter and Materials Physics (2015), 91

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See detailThis Country Has the Real Apprentice: Germany’s approach to worker training allows people to enjoy a middle-class lifestyle.
Schuetze, Christopher F.; Powell, Justin J W UL; Fortwengel, Johann

Diverse speeches and writings (2017)

WUPPERTAL, Germany — Edgar Wingert, a 39-year-old-year material specialist, had always wanted a career in the German military. But when, after nearly a year in the service, his relatively poor eyesight ... [more ▼]

WUPPERTAL, Germany — Edgar Wingert, a 39-year-old-year material specialist, had always wanted a career in the German military. But when, after nearly a year in the service, his relatively poor eyesight forced him to abandon his dream career, he went to work as an untrained worker in the local paper mill. After the financial crisis hit and he was laid off, Wingert thought for the first time about doing his "Ausbildung," the German name for the professional training approach that involves both theoretical learning and on-the-job training – an apprenticeship. Passing both would get him his journeyman's letter, the technical qualification that allows millions of Germans without a university degree to do challenging and rewarding work, earn a good income and know that they can easily find new work, if they are laid off or otherwise want to leave their employers. "By the time I started thinking about doing an apprenticeship, I was 30 and it was too late," he says, taking a break from cleaning the laser printing nozzle used to inscribe the name of the German manufacturer Knipex onto the insulating grip on hundreds of pliers stacked neatly in boxes by his side. Germany, which is currently enjoying its lowest unemployment rate in 37 years, is well known for a system of standardized, superior training qualifications, which allow primarily young people to train and get recognized for specific jobs. In Germany, everything from selling cars to building pianos and harpsichords has its own practical technical schooling, testing and qualifications. It is a system that experts say allows a highly capable workforce to earn middle-class wages, enjoy job security and bring a high level of expertise to jobs that increasingly rely on more than just muscle, nimble fingers and endurance. "The key to the success of the German model is interlocking of practical training and theoretical learning," says professor Justin J.W. Powell at the University of Luxembourg, who has studied apprenticeship systems both in German and the United States. Worker training will surely be discussed at the July 7-8 summit of Group of 20 leading rich and developing nations, which will be held in the northern German port city of Hamburg. Much of the media attention will focus on Trump's meeting with Russian leader Vladimir Putin, and on climate change, where the American leader has departed from allies by announcing his country's withdrawal from the Paris climate accords. But economic issues such as trade remain the heart of the G20's work, and worker training is a major issue for wealthy nations, whose aging populations continue to grapple with rapidly changing economic currents. Training is a hot topic in many countries. In the United States, for example, debate is intensifying over how best to create jobs for adults lacking a four-year college degree. Despite U.S. President Donald Trump's criticism of Germany and its trade practices, he announced a boosting of the apprenticeship programs that many experts say is an attempt to emulate Germany's success in closing the so-called skills gap – the gulf between companies' need for a high-trained workforce and the job seekers who are not adequately trained for the jobs on offer. "For decades, Germany has been a model for highly successful apprenticeship – that's a name I like, apprentice – apprenticeship programs," Trump reportedly said during a roundtable discussion with the chancellor of Germany, Angela Merkel. Wingert's big chance to do a formal apprenticeship came in 2012, when Knipex, the company he still works for, offered him and some of his colleagues the chance to get trained. He would be excused from the factory floor for a week each month to pursue a yearlong course that, after a series of two written tests and one practical test, would earn him the official title of machine and systems operator. That professional qualification allows him to apply to higher-paying jobs in the factory, but also lets him more easily enter other manufacturing businesses at a higher pay. The cost of the tuition at the trade college and the 12 weeks of missed work are payed by the federal employment office under a program designed to train older adults. In 2015 the program helped train more than 24,000 people in Germany all over at a cost of roughly 180 million euros, or about $206 million. "You should see what it means for people to get the letter of acceptance," says Sandra Urspruch, a member of the company's human resources department. "It's like getting the golden ticket." At Knipex less than 40 percent of those working on the factory floor have professional qualifications. The balance, who are untrained, execute relatively straightforward tasks on pre-set machines and pre-determined routines; they are more likely to be let go if orders decrease. A fairly typical story of German prowess in small and mid-sized manufacturing companies, Knipex was founded in the second half of the 19th century, well after the industrial revolution had reached the German Ruhr-area, still the heartland of the biggest manufacturing economy in Europe. The Knipex factory, a sprawling series of buildings and halls that now employs about 800 workers who make about 45,000 pliers a day, stands on the site of the original factory, where the founder, who was the current director's great grandfather, was making about 120 pliers a day. Despite its history, the plier factory is aggressively modern. Robots now handle some of the heavy industrial forges. Most of the factory halls are lit with natural light. Small glass-enclosed cabinets ensure that smokers do not affect the indoor-air quality. One section of one floor – where the tools are neatly sorted and the machines look especially modern – is dedicated entirely to training the young who will spend up to three years getting professional qualifications. Knipex was also fairly forward-thinking in starting the program that allows older adults, like Wingert, to go through professional training. While the company itself does not carry any of the cost, it does have to reorganize schedules and in some cases hire extra workers to fill-in for the time Wingert and his peers miss on the factory floor. Besides, now trained and certified, nothing stops them from going up the road to look for better employment opportunities. For the company such inconvenience is paid off by the loyalty it brings, explains Urspruch. Besides, at a time when many workers are retiring and when the jobs become technically more complex, the measure guarantees the manufacturer a steady supply of well-trained employees. For the government-run national employment agency, footing the bill is a way to make sure unemployment numbers stay low. "Employees without a professional qualification or diploma are usually more vulnerable to unemployment, or in cases where they don't have jobs, have a harder time finding employment," says Paul Ebsen, a spokesperson for the German national employment agency. "That's why the employment agency puts so much stake in professional qualifications." Johann Fortwengel, who has extensively studied German firms who come to America looking for locally trained professional manufacturing technicians to hire – or failing that try to help develop an apprentice system to help train workers – says many Americans don't understand the German concept of apprenticeships. For one, many Americans don't realize that the vast majority of Germans who enter into the system are under 20. "In the States, most people who enter apprenticeships seem to be in the 20s, or even early 30s," says Fortwengel, a lecturer in International Management at Kings College in London. There's also a stigma attached to apprenticeship and technical colleges that is less pronounced in Germany, adds Fortwengel. "Everyone wants to do a bachelor's degree," he says of American culture. But according to experts, the core difference between Germany and the U.S. is how many people and businesses rely on the national apprenticeship system. In the U.S., where the Department of Labor promotes "ApprenticeshipUSA," many – if not most – manufacturing companies still tend to train and evaluate workers themselves, a practice that can leave workers with the kind of narrow training that makes changing jobs difficult. "The German system is so special because it is so standardized," says Fortwengel. According to the University of Luxembourg's Powell, the German system also differs from the American one because of the stakeholders involved: "What makes the system so unique is corporatism; the tripartite of unions, government and companies." Such a structure is one of the reasons that Fortwengel doesn't believe the German system can be easily transplanted into America. "Even in a hundred years, it won't be like the German system," he says. More likely, it will be a training system with a distinctly American flavor." [less ▲]

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See detail“This is my truth, tell me yours.” Deconstructive pragmatism as a philosophy for education.
Biesta, Gert UL

in Educational Philosophy and Theory (2010), 42(7), 710-727

Detailed reference viewed: 150 (1 UL)
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See detailThis is not a scandal in Luxembourg
Majerus, Benoît UL

in Entreprises et Histoire (2020)

At the beginning of the 1970s, Investors Overseas Service (IOS), a Panamanian company run by an American businessman, Bernie Cornfeld, with some of its subsidiaries domiciled in Luxembourg, experienced a ... [more ▼]

At the beginning of the 1970s, Investors Overseas Service (IOS), a Panamanian company run by an American businessman, Bernie Cornfeld, with some of its subsidiaries domiciled in Luxembourg, experienced a spectacular collapse. This was the first time that the Luxembourg financial centre appeared in the local and international media as a player in a globalised financial world. The crash of IOS referred to by some European press outlets as a Luxembourgish scandal, was not described in the same terms by the Luxembourg press and political elite. This case study examines how (financial) scandals erupt and are closed down in small countries. [less ▲]

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See detailTHIS TIME IS REALLY DIFFERENT: FLIGHT-TO-SAFETY AND THE COVID-19 CRISIS
Löwen, Celina; Kchouri, Bilal UL; Lehnert, Thorsten UL

E-print/Working paper (2020)

Detailed reference viewed: 99 (11 UL)
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See detailThomas Mann am Strand : Tourismus und Alltag in "Tod in Venedig"
Kohns, Oliver UL

in Carstensen, Thorsten; Pirholt, Mattias (Eds.) Das Abenteuer des Gewöhnlichen : Alltag in der deutschsprachigen Literatur der Moderne (2018)

Detailed reference viewed: 118 (1 UL)
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See detailThomas Vercruysse (dir.), Luxembourg – Ville créative, Capybara Books 2015, 269 p.
Evrard, Estelle UL

in Hemecht: Zeitschrift für Luxemburger Geschichte (2019), 3

Luxembourg – Ville créative est un ouvrage riche du regard pluridisciplinaire des universitaires et experts en sémiotique, philosophie, littérature, histoire et cinéma. C’est aussi un ouvrage éclectique ... [more ▼]

Luxembourg – Ville créative est un ouvrage riche du regard pluridisciplinaire des universitaires et experts en sémiotique, philosophie, littérature, histoire et cinéma. C’est aussi un ouvrage éclectique puisque le concept de ville créative n’est véritablement opérant que dans le cadre de certaines contributions, pour analyser les conséquences et manifestations de certains développements métropolitains (e.g. développement du quartier du Limpertsberg et, en creux, l’urbanisation du plateau du Kirchberg). Les contributions plus littéraires proposent davantage des regards s’inspirant de la géocritique donnant à montrer comment la (mé)connaissance d’un lieu participe à la construction d’une représentation. [less ▲]

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See detailThought, Language, and Reasoning. Perspectives on the Relation Between Mind and Language
Fraissler, Hannes UL

Doctoral thesis (2021)

This dissertation is an investigation into the relation between mind and language from different perspectives, split up into three interrelated but still, for the most part, self-standing parts. Parts I ... [more ▼]

This dissertation is an investigation into the relation between mind and language from different perspectives, split up into three interrelated but still, for the most part, self-standing parts. Parts I and II are concerned with the question how thought is affected by language while Part III investigates the scope covered by mind and language respectively. Part I provides a reconstruction of Ludwig Wittgenstein’s famous Private Language Argument in order to apply the rationale behind this line of argument to the relation between mind and language. This argumentative strategy yields the conclusion that reasoning – an important type of thought – is constitutively dependent on language possession and is therefore not available to non-linguistic creatures. This result is achieved by considering the preconditions for reasoning – given that it is a rule-governed activity – and eliminating competitors to language for providing reasoners with what it takes to reason. Part II provides a critical outlook on the wide and highly heterogeneous field of linguistic relativity theories. It is argued that no kind of linguistic relativity whatsoever follows from the conclusion of Part I – i.e., the claim that reasoning is constitutively dependent on having a language. While Part II does not provide a conclusive argument against the linguistic relativity hypothesis, it is argued that endorsement of linguistic relativity theories often rests on a mistaken assumption to the effect that language and culture are interwoven in a way which makes it impossible to separate culture and language, as well as their respective studies. This assumption is undermined by providing examples of languages which clearly predate their culture (Esperanto) or do not even have a culture at all (Klingon). So, the assumption that language and culture are inextricably intertwined is refuted by way of counterexample. Part III provides an in-depth examination of the Principle of Expressibility – prominently endorsed and formulated by John Searle – which claims that whatever can be thought can also be said. The domains of what can be thought and of what can be said are considered in set theoretic terms in order to determine whether one is contained in the other, so that everything we can think can also be adequately communicated. After thorough study of interpretative issues regarding the Principle of Expressibility and consideration of the most pressing potential counterexamples to the principle, we can conclude that we have good reason to believe in the truth of the Principle of Expressibility. In conclusion, the achieved results are related back to prominent positions in the discussion about thought and language which already make their appearance in the very beginning of this investigation. The final chapter of this dissertation reminds us that eminent figures in philosophy have often taken a wrongheaded perspective on the relation between language and thought, so that language has frequently appeared to be an impediment to thought. We can, however, confidently conclude that language, on the contrary, is by far our most apt means for thought and that reasoning would not even be possible without the resources language provides. [less ▲]

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See detailThreat Adaptive Byzantine Fault Tolerant State-Machine Replication
Simoes Silva, Douglas UL; Graczyk, Rafal UL; Decouchant, Jérémie et al

Scientific Conference (2021, September)

Critical infrastructures have to withstand advanced and persistent threats, which can be addressed using Byzantine fault tolerant state-machine replication (BFT-SMR). In practice, unattended cyberdefense ... [more ▼]

Critical infrastructures have to withstand advanced and persistent threats, which can be addressed using Byzantine fault tolerant state-machine replication (BFT-SMR). In practice, unattended cyberdefense systems rely on threat level detectors that synchronously inform them of changing threat levels. How- ever, to have a BFT-SMR protocol operate unattended, the state- of-the-art is still to configure them to withstand the highest possible number of faulty replicas f they might encounter, which limits their performance, or to make the strong assumption that a trusted external reconfiguration service is available, which introduces a single point of failure. In this work, we present ThreatAdaptive the first BFT-SMR protocol that is automatically strengthened or optimized by its replicas in reaction to threat level changes. We first determine under which conditions replicas can safely reconfigure a BFT-SMR system, i.e., adapt the number of replicas n and the fault threshold f, so as to outpace an adversary. Since replicas typically communicate with each other using an asynchronous network they cannot rely on consensus to decide how the system should be reconfigured. ThreatAdaptive avoids this pitfall by proactively preparing the reconfiguration that may be triggered by an increasing threat when it optimizes its performance. Our evaluation shows that ThreatAdaptive can meet the latency and throughput of BFT baselines configured statically for a particular level of threat, and adapt 30% faster than previous methods, which make stronger assumptions to provide safety. [less ▲]

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See detailThreats to the validity of mutation-based test assessment
Papadakis, Mike UL; Henard, Christopher; Harman, Mark et al

in International Symposium on Software Testing and Analysis, ISSTA 2016 (2016)

Detailed reference viewed: 144 (14 UL)
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See detailThe three A symmetry Raman modes of kesterite in Cu2ZnSnSe4
Djemour, Rabie UL; Redinger, Alex UL; Mousel, Marina UL et al

in Optics Express (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 166 (6 UL)
See detailThree applications of anti-de Sitter geometry
Schlenker, Jean-Marc UL

Speeches/Talks (2015)

Detailed reference viewed: 52 (5 UL)