Browsing
     by title


0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

or enter first few letters:   
OK
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailUrban Policy in the Time of Obama
Hesse, Markus UL

in DISP Dokumente und Informationen zur Schweizerischen Orts-, Regional- und Landesplanung (2018), 54(212/1), 76

Detailed reference viewed: 50 (4 UL)
See detailUrban social structure, social capital and spatial proximity
Patacchini, Eleonora; Picard, Pierre M UL; Zenou, Yves

E-print/Working paper (2015)

We develop a theoretical model where the existence and intensity of dyadic contacts depend on location. We show that agents tend to interact more with agents that are highly central in the network of ... [more ▼]

We develop a theoretical model where the existence and intensity of dyadic contacts depend on location. We show that agents tend to interact more with agents that are highly central in the network of social contacts and that are geographically closer. Using a unique geo-coded dataset of friendship networks in the United States, we find evidence consistent with this model. The main empirical challenge, which is the possible endogenous network formation, is tackled by employing a Bayesian methodology that allows to estimate simultaneously network formation and intensity of network contacts. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 93 (14 UL)
Full Text
See detailUrban Space and Logistics. On the road to Sustainability?
Hesse, Markus UL

in World Transport Policy & Practice (1995), 1(1), 39-45

Detailed reference viewed: 142 (1 UL)
See detailUrban Spaces and the complexity of Cities
Fray, Jean-Luc; Pauly, Michel UL; Pinheiro, Magda et al

Book published by Böhlau (2018)

Detailed reference viewed: 92 (2 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailUrban spaces as public action ‘made durable’. Open spaces and urban change in Milan
Bricocoli, Massimo UL; Savoldi, Paola

in Madanipour, Ali; Knierbein, Sabine; Degros, Aglaée (Eds.) Public Space and the Challenges of Urban Transformation in Europe (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 94 (5 UL)
Full Text
See detailUrban Spatial Structure, Employment
Picard, Pierre M UL; Zenou, Yves

Presentation (2014, October)

We develop a model where workers both choose their residential location (geographical space) and social interactions (social space). In equilibrium, we show under which condition the majority group ... [more ▼]

We develop a model where workers both choose their residential location (geographical space) and social interactions (social space). In equilibrium, we show under which condition the majority group resides close to the job center while the minority group lives far away from it. Even though the two populations are ex ante totally identical, we find that the majority group experiences a lower unemployment rate than the minority group and tends to socially interact more with other workers of its own group. Within each group, we demonstrate that workers residing farther away from the job center tend to search less for a job and are less likely to be employed. This model is thus able to explain why ethnic minorities are segregated in the urban and social space and why this leads to adverse labor-market outcomes in the absence of any discrimination against the minority group. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 53 (10 UL)
Full Text
See detailUrban Spatial Structure, Employment and Social Ties
Picard, Pierre M UL

Scientific Conference (2014, November)

We develop a model where workers both choose their residential location (geographical space) and social interactions (social space). In equilibrium, we show under which condition the majority group ... [more ▼]

We develop a model where workers both choose their residential location (geographical space) and social interactions (social space). In equilibrium, we show under which condition the majority group resides close to the job center while the minority group lives far away from it. Even though the two populations are ex ante totally identical, we find that the majority group experiences a lower unemployment rate than the minority group and tends to socially interact more with other workers of its own group. Within each group, we demonstrate that workers residing farther away from the job center tend to search less for a job and are less likely to be employed. This model is thus able to explain why ethnic minorities are segregated in the urban and social space and why this leads to adverse labor-market outcomes in the absence of any discrimination against the minority group. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 133 (10 UL)
Full Text
See detailUrban Spatial Structure, Employment and Social Ties
Picard, Pierre M UL; Zenou, Yves

Presentation (2014, October)

We develop a model where workers both choose their residential location (geographical space) and social interactions (social space). In equilibrium, we show under which condition the majority group ... [more ▼]

We develop a model where workers both choose their residential location (geographical space) and social interactions (social space). In equilibrium, we show under which condition the majority group resides close to the job center while the minority group lives far away from it. Even though the two populations are ex ante totally identical, we find that the majority group experiences a lower unemployment rate than the minority group and tends to socially interact more with other workers of its own group. Within each group, we demonstrate that workers residing farther away from the job center tend to search less for a job and are less likely to be employed. This model is thus able to explain why ethnic minorities are segregated in the urban and social space and why this leads to adverse labor-market outcomes in the absence of any discrimination against the minority group. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 106 (13 UL)
Full Text
See detailUrban Spatial Structure, Employment and Social Ties
Picard, Pierre M UL; Zenou, Yves

E-print/Working paper (2014)

We develop a model where workers both choose their residential location (geographical space) and social interactions (social space). In equilibrium, we show under which condition the majority group ... [more ▼]

We develop a model where workers both choose their residential location (geographical space) and social interactions (social space). In equilibrium, we show under which condition the majority group resides close to the job center while the minority group lives far away from it. Even though the two populations are ex ante totally identical, we find that the majority group experiences a lower unemployment rate than the minority group and tends to socially interact more with other workers of its own group. Within each group, we demonstrate that workers residing farther away from the job center tend to search less for a job and are less likely to be employed. This model is thus able to explain why ethnic minorities are segregated in the urban and social space and why this leads to adverse labor-market outcomes in the absence of any discrimination against the minority group. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 103 (10 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailUrban spatial structure, employment and social ties
Picard, Pierre M UL; zenou, yves

in Journal of Urban Economics (2018), 104(C), 77-93

Consider a model where workers from the majority and the minority group choose both their residential location (geographical space) and the intensity of their social interactions (social space). We ... [more ▼]

Consider a model where workers from the majority and the minority group choose both their residential location (geographical space) and the intensity of their social interactions (social space). We demonstrate under which condition one group resides close to the job center while the other lives far away from it. Even though the two groups have the same characteristics and there is no discrimination in the housing or labor market, we show that the majority group can have a lower unemployment rate whenever it resides close to or far away from the workplace. This is because this group generates a larger and better-quality social network. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 76 (2 UL)
Full Text
See detailUrban Structures with Forward and Backward Linkages
Picard, Pierre M UL; Mossay, Pascal; Tabuchi, Takatoshi

E-print/Working paper (2017)

We study urban structures driven by demand and vertical linkages in the presence of increasing returns to scale. Individuals consume local urban varieties and firms use these varieties to produce a ... [more ▼]

We study urban structures driven by demand and vertical linkages in the presence of increasing returns to scale. Individuals consume local urban varieties and firms use these varieties to produce a national good. We prove the existence of a spatial equilibrium and obtain an invariance result according to which more intense demand or vertical linkages have the same effect on the urban structure as lower commuting costs. Various urban configurations can emerge exhibiting a monocentric, an integrated, a duocentric, or a partially integrated city structure. We discuss the role of commuting and transport costs, intensities of demand and vertical linkages, and urbanization in affecting these patterns. We show that multiple equilibria may arise in equilibrium involving the monocentric city and up to a couple of duocentric and partially integrated structures. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 52 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detail“Urban-Rural” Dynamics and Indigenous Urbanization: The Case of Inuit Language Use in Ottawa
Budach, Gabriele UL

in Journal of Language, Identity & Education (2014)

The establishment of cities in Canada has played a pivotal role in the displacement, dispossession, and marginalization of Indigenous peoples. Yet, more than half of the Indigenous population now resides ... [more ▼]

The establishment of cities in Canada has played a pivotal role in the displacement, dispossession, and marginalization of Indigenous peoples. Yet, more than half of the Indigenous population now resides in cities, and urbanization continues to increase. This paper addresses a specific aspect of Inuit mobility—namely, migration and the dynamic use of Inuit language and knowledge in the city of Ottawa. Drawing on community-based participatory research in collaboration with an Ottawa Inuit literacy centre, we investigate a range of Inuit-led educational practices that emerged from collaborative work with a group of Inuit women. Suggested activities drew on semiotic resources—including objects and language—that involved retracing the migrational trajectories of Inuit between cities and between nonurban communities, particularly those in their Arctic “homelands.” Such practices appear to cut across the “urban-rural divide,” particularly since cities were rarely mentioned, a fact that seems to signal the irrelevance of this dichotomy for urban Inuit. In this context, the exploration of artifactual literacies—more specifically, speaker interactions that unfold around culturally meaningful objects—led to the following conclusions: (1) multilingual oracy is key to complex transcontextual meaning making; (2) spatiotemporal reference is anchored both in individual experience and in connectivity with members of a newly constituted community; and (3) there is a sharing of cross-generational horizontal knowledge, which includes the abstention from any enforcement of a linguistic norm. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 143 (3 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailUn urbanisme sans ‘histoires’ : l’amélioration des conditions de vie dans l’habitat des réfugiés palestiniens à Amman
Oesch, Lucas UL

in Matthey, Laurent; Mager, Christophe; Gaillard, David (Eds.) et al Faire des histoires ? Du récit d’urbanisme à l’urbanisme fictionnel (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (5 UL)
Full Text
See detailUrbanität als Habitus
Hesse, Markus UL

in Geographische Zeitschrift (2013), 100(2), 121-122

Detailed reference viewed: 116 (4 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailUrbanität im ländlichen Raum. Wohnmigration in der deutsch-luxemburgischen Grenzregion
Boesen, Elisabeth UL; Schnuer, Gregor; Wille, Christian UL

in Garstenauer, Rita; Unterwurzacher, Anne (Eds.) Aufbrechen, Arbeiten, Ankommen. Mobilität und Migration im ländlichen Raum seit 1945 (2015)

Studies on the connection of migration and urbanity are usually concerned with conditions and developments in cities. The possible presence of ‘urbanity’ also in rural space is the topic of the present ... [more ▼]

Studies on the connection of migration and urbanity are usually concerned with conditions and developments in cities. The possible presence of ‘urbanity’ also in rural space is the topic of the present contribution and will be discussed through the example of residential migration in the ‘Greater Region Saar-Lor-Lux’. The massive influx of residential migrants from Luxembourg into the border regions of the neighbouring countries is a relatively recent phenomenon, the main cause of which lies in the developments in the real-estate market in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. This phenomenon is of special interest for the topic of migration in rural areas in two regards: on the one hand, because of the complex composition of the group of residential migrants, which is extremely differentiated regarding the dimension rural - urban; and on the other hand, because of the serious demographic changes, which the residential migrants have produced in individual border villages. Central to our study is the question, whether urban attitudes and practices become visible in German border villages, and, if so, how the migratory movement from Luxembourg influences this ‘rural urbanity’. Furthermore, taking the everyday practices of the residential migrants as starting point, this contribution considers the question, in how far the dichotomy urbanity - rurality presents a conceptual approach for the examination of individual and structural integration processes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 319 (28 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailUrbanization and growth
Bertinelli, Luisito UL; Black, Duncan

in Journal of Urban Economics (2004), 56(1), 80-96

In a simple urban economics framework, we aim at highlighting how the trade-off between optimal and equilibrium city size behaves when introducing dynamic human capital externalities beside the classical ... [more ▼]

In a simple urban economics framework, we aim at highlighting how the trade-off between optimal and equilibrium city size behaves when introducing dynamic human capital externalities beside the classical congestion externalities. Our purpose is to show that there are dynamic gains from oversized cities. To this end, we assume that productivity depends on human capital, which is solely accumulated in cities, such that urbanization is the engine of growth. In an empirical illustration, we highlight the link between urbanization and human capital accumulation, by focusing on cross-country panel data.<P>(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.) [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 361 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailUrbanization, Urban Concentration and Economic Growth in Developing Countries
Bertinelli, Luisito UL; Strobl, Eric

in Urban Studies (2007), 44(13), 2499-2510

Detailed reference viewed: 154 (2 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailUrgency
Billieux, Joël UL

in Zeigler-Hill, Virgil; Shackelford, Todd K. (Eds.) Encyclopedia of Personality and Individual Differences (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 76 (2 UL)