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See detailWhat strategies are effective for exercise adherence in heart failure? A systematic review of controlled studies.
Tierney, Stephanie; Mamas, Mamas; Woods, Stephen et al

in Heart failure reviews (2012), 17(1), 107-15

Physical activity is recommended for people with stable heart failure (HF), because it is known to improve quality of life and health outcomes. However, adherence to this recommendation has been poor in ... [more ▼]

Physical activity is recommended for people with stable heart failure (HF), because it is known to improve quality of life and health outcomes. However, adherence to this recommendation has been poor in many studies. A systematic review was conducted to examine the effectiveness of strategies used to promote exercise adherence in those with HF. The following databases were searched for relevant literature published between January 1980 and December 2010: British Nursing Index; CINAHL; Cochrane Library; Embase; Medline and PsycINFO. Papers with a control group focused on adults with HF that measured exercise or physical activity adherence were included. Nine randomised controlled trials were identified, involving a total of 3,231 patients (range 16-2,331). Six of these studies were informed by specific psychological theories. Positive outcomes occurred in the short-term from interventions using approaches such as exercise prescriptions, goal setting, feedback and problem-solving. However, longer-term maintenance of exercise was less successful. There was some support for interventions underpinned by theoretical frameworks, but more research is required to make clearer recommendations. Addressing self-efficacy in relation to exercise may be a particularly useful area to consider in this respect. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat they highlight is ...: The discourse functions of basic wh-clefts in lectures.
Deroey, Katrien UL

in Journal of English for Academic Purposes (2012), 11(2), 112-124

This paper reports findings from a study on the discourse functions of basic wh-clefts such as what our brains do is complicated information processing in 160 lectures drawn from the British Academic ... [more ▼]

This paper reports findings from a study on the discourse functions of basic wh-clefts such as what our brains do is complicated information processing in 160 lectures drawn from the British Academic Spoken English (BASE) corpus. Like much linguistic research on this academic genre, the investigation is motivated by the need to gain a better understanding of language use in lectures to aid effective English for Academic Purposes (EAP) course design. To this end, the composition of the wh-clauses was analysed for its main constituents (subjects, verb phrases and modality) and the clefts were grouped according to their apparent main function and subfunction within the lecture discourse. The results show that basic wh-clefts mostly serve to highlight aspects of content information and there was also disciplinary variation in their use. Implications for EAP course design are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat they highlight is: the discourse functions of basic wh-clefts in lectures
Deroey, Katrien UL

Scientific Conference (2009, July)

As part of a study of lecture functions in general and highlighting devices in specific, this paper presents the findings of an investigation into the discourse functions of basic wh-cleft clauses in a ... [more ▼]

As part of a study of lecture functions in general and highlighting devices in specific, this paper presents the findings of an investigation into the discourse functions of basic wh-cleft clauses in a corpus of lectures. These clauses, such as What our brains do is complicated information processing, are identifying constructions which background the information in the relative clause (What our brains do) and present the information foregrounded in the complement (complicated information processing) as newsworthy. Corpus-based studies of this construction to date have mainly described its function in writing (Collins 1991, Herriman 2003 & 2004) and spontaneous speech (Collins 1991 & 2006). From his examination of wh-clefts in speech and writing, Collins (1991: 214) concludes that ‘the linear progression from explicitly represented non-news to news offers speakers an extended opportunity to formulate the message’, while Biber et al (1999: 963) note that in conversation, speakers may use this construction with its typically low information content as ‘a springboard in starting an utterance’. With regard to academic speech, Rowley-Jolivet & Carter-Thomas (2003) found that basic wh-clefts are particularly effective in conference presentations to highlight the New and that their apparent ‘underlying presupposed question’ (p. 57) adds a dialogic dimension to monologic speech. All these features suggest that wh-clefts may be a useful in lectures, which are typically monologic and mainly concerned with imparting information. So far, however, studies on the function of these clefts in lectures have generally focussed on the function of part of the wh-clause as a lexical bundle (Biber 2006, Nesi & Basturkmen 2006) and mostly discussed its role as a discourse organising device. For the current investigation, a corpus of 12 lectures drawn from the British Academic Spoken English (BASE) Corpus were analysed. This yielded 132 basic wh-clefts, which were classified for their main discourse functions based on the presence of certain lexico-grammatical features, the functional relationship between the clefts and their co-text and an understanding of the purposes of and disciplinary variation within the lecture genre. Four main functional categories thus emerged: informing, evaluating, discourse organizing, evaluating and managing the class. These functions of wh-clefts and their relative frequency are discussed and related to lecture purposes; incidental findings on their co-occurrence with pauses and discourse markers are also touched upon. The study of this highlighting device in a lecture corpus thus aims to contribute to our understanding of what happens in authentic lectures and how this is reflected in the language. References Biber, D. (2006). University language: a corpus-based study of spoken and written registers. Studies in Corpus Linguistics 23. Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company. Biber, D., S. Johansson, G. Leech, S. Conrad, & E. Finegan (1999). The Longman grammar of spoken and written English. London: Longman. Collins, P. C. (1991). Cleft and pseudo-cleft constructions in English. London: Routledge. Collins, P. C. (2006). It-clefts and wh-clefts: prosody and pragmatics. Journal of Pragmatics, 38, 1706-1720. Herriman, J. (2003). Negotiating identity: the interpersonal functions of wh-clefts in English. Functions of Language, 10 (1), 1-30. Herriman, J. (2004). Identifying relations: the semantic functions of wh-clefts in English. Text, 24 (4), 447-469. Nesi, H. & Basturkmen, H. (2006). Lexical bundles and discourse signalling in academic lectures. International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, 11 (3), 283-304. Rowley-Jolivet, E. & Carter-Thomas, S. (2005). Genre awareness and rhetorical appropriacy: manipulation of information structure by NS and NNS scientists in the international conference setting. English for Specific purposes, 24, 41-64. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat we can learn about ocean tides from tide gauge and gravity loading measurements?
Francis, Olivier UL; Mazzega, P.

in Kakkuri, Juhani (Ed.) Eleventh International Symposium on Earth Tides, Proceedings of the meeting held July 31 - August 5, 1989, in Helsinki, Finland (1991)

The harmonic constants from tide gauge stations and from gravity loading measurements of the ICET (International Center for Earth Tides) data bank are separately inverted to produce M2 cotidal maps on a ... [more ▼]

The harmonic constants from tide gauge stations and from gravity loading measurements of the ICET (International Center for Earth Tides) data bank are separately inverted to produce M2 cotidal maps on a global scale. The optimal interpolation of these data, based on the total inverse theory in L2 norm, makes use of a set of a priori stationary and isotropic covariance functions deduced from a global hydrodynamical model and from its corresponding gravity loading map. The preliminary results presented with formal error estimates are surprisingly good, in particular the M2 maps obtained from the numerous tide gauge data. These results are discussed and further lines of work are drawn. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat we know about testing embedded software
Garousi, Vahid UL; Felderer, Michael; Karapıçak, Çağrı Murat et al

in IEEE Software (2018), 35(4), 62-69

To cost-effectively test embedded software, practitioners and researchers have proposed many test techniques, approaches, tools, and frameworks. However, obtaining an overview of the state of the art and ... [more ▼]

To cost-effectively test embedded software, practitioners and researchers have proposed many test techniques, approaches, tools, and frameworks. However, obtaining an overview of the state of the art and state of the practice in this area is challenging for practitioners or new researchers. In addition, owing to an inadequate overview of what already exists in this area, some companies often reinvent the wheel by designing a test approach that’s new to them but already exists. To address these problems, the authors conducted a systematic literature review of this area that covered the testing topics, testing activities, test artifacts, and industries on which the studies focused. The results can benefit both practitioners and researchers by serving as an index to the vast body of knowledge in this important, fast-growing area. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat you give you get, or not? The effects of intergenerational family solidarity on subjective well-being
Albert, Isabelle UL; Barros Coimbra, Stephanie UL

Scientific Conference (2018, September 06)

Much attention has been focused on intergenerational relations and family cultures as these developments are, amongst others, related to important socio-demographic changes creating a new reality for ... [more ▼]

Much attention has been focused on intergenerational relations and family cultures as these developments are, amongst others, related to important socio-demographic changes creating a new reality for families in Europe. Thus, solidarity and mutual support between adult children and their older parents are of particular interest as the exchange and “amount” of mutual support between both generations might gain importance for the well-being of each family member. Additionally, the specific context of migration can arouse special needs in terms of intergenerational support. The current study presents a cross-cultural comparison between Luxembourgish native and Portuguese migrant families, all living in Luxembourg. Quantitative data (n = 118 family triads) gathered by means of standardised questionnaires as well as qualitative data (n = 20 family dyads) collected with face-to-face interviews underlie the discussed results. Regardless of the culture, quantitative results show a higher provided social support from parents to children than the received one. However, PT children reported receiving as much as providing social support to their parents, while LU children reported receiving more support than the one they give. Further analyses will be carried out in order to differentiate between different kinds of support (financial, instrumental and emotional) making use of quantitative as well as qualitative data. Implications regarding family solidarity will be discussed in order to highlight similarities and differences between and within cultures and family generations. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat You See Is What You (Don’t) Get: A Comment on Funke’s (2014) Opinion Paper
Greiff, Samuel UL; Martin, Romain UL

in Frontiers in Psychology (2014), 5

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See detailWhat You should Believe
Boella, Guido UL; Pereira, Célia Da Costa UL; Pigozzi, Gabriella UL et al

in Proceedings of The 19th Belgian-Dutch Conference on Artificial Intelligence (BNAIC 2007) (2007)

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See detailWhat “taking place” means : Pierre Schoentjes’ écopoétique
Thiltges, Sébastian UL

in Ecozon@ (2016), 7(1),

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See detail„What’s a normal weight?“ – Weight assessment standards in Origin- and Receiving Country and Immigrant Adolescents’ Weight-Status Self-Assessment
Kern, Matthias Robert UL; Heinz, Andreas UL; Stevens, Gonneke et al

Scientific Conference (2019, June 19)

Background: Many young people struggle with correctly assessing their weight-status, often leaving over- or underweight to go unnoticed thereby preventing adequate intervention. The prevalence of weight ... [more ▼]

Background: Many young people struggle with correctly assessing their weight-status, often leaving over- or underweight to go unnoticed thereby preventing adequate intervention. The prevalence of weight-status misperception differs considerably cross-nationally, indicating that individual weight-status assessment is informed by culturally transmitted standards of evaluation. For adolescents with a migration background, this brings up the problem of multiple frames of reference, as their perception of weight-status may be influenced by different cultural standards. Objective: We investigate the extent to which the assessment of one's own weight-status is based on standards of the heritage country or the receiving country. Methods: Data are retrieved from the 2014 Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children study. The cross-national design of the study enabled us to aggregate weight-evaluation standards for 41 countries and subsequently identify a large sample of 8132 immigrant adolescents in 23 receiving countries from 41 heritage countries. The influence of heritage- and receiving country standards of evaluation was assessed using cross-classified multilevel models. Results: Descriptive analyses reveal considerable differences in weight-evaluation standards between the countries. We find evidence of a significant influence of both heritage- and receiving culture standards of evaluation, with a stronger impact of receiving culture standards. Stratified analyses reveal a stronger influence of heritage culture standards among first- than among second-generation immigrants, and a stronger influence of receiving culture standards among second- than among first-generation immigrants. Conclusions: The results corroborate our expectations regarding the persistency of cultural standards and help to understand inter-ethnic differences in weight-status assessment. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat's Around the Corner? Enhancing Driver Awareness in Autonomous Vehicles via In-Vehicle Spatial Auditory Displays
Beattie, David; Baillie, Lynne; Halvey, Martin et al

in Proceedings of NordiCHI '14, October 26 - 30 2014, Helsinki, Finland (2014, October 26)

There is currently a distinct lack of design consideration associated with autonomous vehicles and their impact on human factors. Research has yet to consider fully the impact felt by the driver when he ... [more ▼]

There is currently a distinct lack of design consideration associated with autonomous vehicles and their impact on human factors. Research has yet to consider fully the impact felt by the driver when he/she is no longer in control of the vehicle [12]. We propose that spatialised auditory feedback could be used to enhance driver awareness to the intended actions of autonomous vehicles. We hypothesise that this feedback will provide drivers with an enhanced sense of control. This paper presents a driving simulator study where 5 separate auditory feedback methods are compared during both autonomous and manual driving scenarios. We found that our spatialised auditory presentation method alerted drivers to the intended actions of autonomous vehicles much more than all other methodsand they felt significantly more in control during scenarios containing sound vs. no sound. Finally, that overall workload in autonomous vehicle scenarios was lower compared to manual vehicle scenarios. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat’s in a Name: Gamifying the Intangible History of Larochette, Luxembourg
Morse, Christopher UL; de Kramer, Marleen UL

in Börner, Wolfgang; Uhlirz, Susanne (Eds.) Proceedings of the 23rd International Conference on Cultural Heritage and New Technologies 2018. CHNT 23, 2018 (Vienna 2019) (2019)

The Larochette app is part of a larger interdisciplinary project to create a digital reconstruction of the town and castle of Larochette, Luxembourg. The paper discusses the creation of an app that serves ... [more ▼]

The Larochette app is part of a larger interdisciplinary project to create a digital reconstruction of the town and castle of Larochette, Luxembourg. The paper discusses the creation of an app that serves to pique interest in linguistics and historical geography, traditionally dry subjects with little intrinsic appeal to children and the general public. This project harnesses this effect, presenting the results of the preceding landscape study in an interactive educational environment that rewards the user for engaging with the content. As the app allows natural movement and intuitive interaction, exploration and learning are prompted by curiosity. The goal of connecting place names to heritage is not explicitly stated, nor is it presented as an educational game. In short, this is the second phase of a collaborative case study in the digital experience of history, which is grounded in user experience design and informed by the historical and architectural expertise of the collaborators. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat's in an Icon? Promises and Pitfalls of Data Protection Iconography
Rossi, Arianna UL; Palmirani, Monica

in Leenes, Ronald; Hallinan, Dara; Gutwirth, Serge (Eds.) et al Data Protection and Privacy: Data Protection and Democracy (2020)

Under the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), transparency of information becomes an obligation aimed at creating an ecosystem where data subjects understand and control what happens to their ... [more ▼]

Under the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), transparency of information becomes an obligation aimed at creating an ecosystem where data subjects understand and control what happens to their personal data. The definition of transparency stresses its user-centric nature, while design considerations to comply with this obligation assume central importance. This article focuses on the icons established by the GDPR Art. 12.7 to offer “a meaningful overview of the intended processing”. Existing attempts to represent data protection through icons have not met widespread adoption and reasons about the strengths and weaknesses of their creation and evaluation are here discussed. Building on this analysis, we present an empirical research proposing a new icon set that responds to GDPR requirements. The article also discusses the challenges of creating and evaluating such icon set and provides some future directions of research for effective an effective implementation and standardization. [less ▲]

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See detailWhat’s the point of lifelong learning if lifelong learning has no point? On the democratic deficit of policies for lifelong learning.
Biesta, Gert UL

in European Educational Research Journal (2006), 5(3-4), 169-180

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See detailWHATS IN A GENOME
BORK, P.; OUZOUNIS, C.; SANDER, C. et al

in Nature (1992), 358(6384), 287-287

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See detailWheeled Pro(p)file of Batalin-Vilkovisky formalism
Merkulov, Sergei UL

in Communications in Mathematical Physics (2010), 295(3), 585638

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See detailWheeled props in algebra, geometry and quantization.
Merkulov, Sergei UL

in Proceedings (2010)

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See detailWheeled PROPs, graph complexes and the master equation
Markl, Martin; Merkulov, Sergei UL; Shadrin, Sergei

in Journal of Pure and Applied Algebra (2009), 213(4), 496-535

We introduce and study wheeled PROPs, an extension of the theory of PROPs which can treat traces and, in particular, solutions to the master equations which involve divergence operators. We construct a dg ... [more ▼]

We introduce and study wheeled PROPs, an extension of the theory of PROPs which can treat traces and, in particular, solutions to the master equations which involve divergence operators. We construct a dg free wheeled PROP whose representations are in one-to-one correspondence with formal germs of SP-manifolds, key geometric objects in the theory of Batalin–Vilkovisky quantization. We also construct minimal wheeled resolutions of classical operads Com and Ass as non-trivial extensions of the well-known dg operads Com-infinityand Ass-infinity source. Finally, we apply the above results to a computation of cohomology of a directed version of Kontsevich’s complex of ribbon graphs. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 90 (2 UL)