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See detailPrevalence and determinants of osteoporosis in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus.
Leidig-Bruckner, Gudrun; Grobholz, Sonja; Bruckner, Thomas et al

in BMC endocrine disorders (2014), 14

BACKGROUND: Increased risk of osteoporosis and its clinical significance in patients with diabetes is controversial. We analyze osteoporosis prevalence and determinants of bone mineral density (BMD) in ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Increased risk of osteoporosis and its clinical significance in patients with diabetes is controversial. We analyze osteoporosis prevalence and determinants of bone mineral density (BMD) in patients with type 1 and 2 diabetes. METHODS: Three hundred and ninety-eight consecutive diabetic patients from a single outpatient clinic received a standardized questionnaire on osteoporosis risk factors, and were evaluated for diabetes-related complications, HbA1c levels, and lumbar spine (LS) and femoral neck (FN) BMD. Of these, 139 (71 men, 68 women) type 1 and 243 (115 men, 128 women) type 2 diabetes patients were included in the study. BMD (T-scores and values adjusted for age, BMI and duration of disease) was compared between patient groups and between patients with type 2 diabetes and population-based controls (255 men, 249 women). RESULTS: For both genders, adjusted BMD was not different between the type 1 and type 2 diabetes groups but was higher in the type 2 group compared with controls (p < 0.0001). Osteoporosis prevalence (BMD T-score < -2.5 SD) at FN and LS was equivalent in the type 1 and type 2 diabetes groups, but lower in type 2 patients compared with controls (FN: 13.0% vs 21.2%, LS: 6.1% vs 14.9% men; FN: 21.9% vs 32.1%, LS: 9.4% vs 26.9% women). Osteoporosis prevalence was higher at FN-BMD than at LS-BMD. BMD was positively correlated with BMI and negatively correlated with age, but not correlated with diabetes-specific parameters (therapy, HbBA1c, micro- and macrovascular complications) in all subgroups. Fragility fracture prevalence was low (5.2%) and not different between diabetes groups. Fracture patients had lower BMDs compared with those without fractures; however, BMD T-score was above -2.5 SD in most patients. CONCLUSIONS: Diabetes-specific parameters did not predict BMD. Fracture occurrence was similar in both diabetes groups and related to lower BMD, but seems unrelated to the threshold T-score, <-2.5 SD. These results suggest that osteoporosis, and related fractures, is a clinically significant and commonly underestimated problem in diabetes patients. [less ▲]

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See detailPrévalence du diabète insulino-dépendant chez les enfants scolarisés de 6 a 16 ans en Lorraine
De Beaufort, Carine UL; Cecchi-Tenerini, R.; Clerc, R. et al

in Archives Françaises de Pédiatrie (1991), 48

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (1 UL)
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See detailPrevalence of dementia in Latin America and Caribbean countries: Systematic review and meta-analyses exploring age, sex, rurality, and education as possible determinants
Ribeiro, Fabiana UL; Teixeira Santos, Ana Carolina UL; Caramelli, Paulo et al

in Ageing Research Reviews (2022)

Background Studies have shown that the prevalence of dementia in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) may be higher than in high-income countries. Thus, we sought to systematically analyse the prevalence ... [more ▼]

Background Studies have shown that the prevalence of dementia in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) may be higher than in high-income countries. Thus, we sought to systematically analyse the prevalence of dementia and explore possible drivers that lead to this disparity in LAC countries. Method We searched Pubmed, Web of Knowledge, Scopus, Lilacs, and SciELO for studies on dementia in LAC countries published in English, Spanish, and Portuguese. Random-effects model was applied. Results Thirty-one studies from 17 LAC countries were included. Pooled prevalence of all-cause dementia was 10.66%. Further analyses with studies providing raw prevalence by sex, area, and educational level showed a higher prevalence for women (8.97%) than for men (7.26%). Also, dementia prevalence was higher for rural than urban residents (7.71% vs 8.68%, respectively). Participants without formal education presented more than double the prevalence of dementia (21.37%) compared to those with at least one year of formal education (9.88%). Studies with more recent data collection showed higher dementia prevalence. Conclusion Our findings suggest a high global dementia prevalence in LAC countries and an unequal burden of dementia for women, lower-educated, and rural residents. Secular increases in dementia prevalence call for greater public health efforts for preventative actions. [less ▲]

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See detailPrevalence of memory impairment 2000-2015 in Sao Paolo, Brazil
Ribeiro, Fabiana UL; de Oliveira Duarte, Yeda; Santos, Jair Licio Ferreira et al

in Alzheimer's and Dementia: the Journal of the Alzheimer's Association (2020), 16

Background: Decreases in prevalence of memory impairment and dementia over the last two decades have been observed in different countries for cohorts entering older age. We sought to explore the changes ... [more ▼]

Background: Decreases in prevalence of memory impairment and dementia over the last two decades have been observed in different countries for cohorts entering older age. We sought to explore the changes in prevalence of cognitive impairment across four waves of the Health, Welfare and Aging survey (SABE) with data collected in Sao Paolo, Brazil, in 2000, 2006, 2010, and 2015. Method: Mini Mental State Exam (MMSE) scores and covariate values were available for 5,191 respondents (62.4% female) aged 60 to 99 across four waves. Cognitive impairment was defined as having <=12 points on a 19-point abbreviated version of the MMSE. Age group, educational attainment (no formal schooling, primary, secondary, post-secondary), self-reported heart disease, stroke, diabetes, hypertension, and BMI (<18.5, 18.5-24.9, 25-29.9, 30+) were adjusted for. Result: In more recent waves, prevalence of cognitive impairment was higher for respondents aged 60-64 years (9.0% in 2015 vs. 4.6% in 2000), 65-69 years (9.7% in 2015 vs. 5.8% in 2006) and 70-74 years (13.9% in 2015 vs. 5.8% in 2006). Between 2015 and 2000, respondents were increasingly more likely to report some formal education (90.8% vs. 75.3%), secondary (17.6% vs. 7.3%) or postsecondary education (11.4% vs. 4.3%). Respondents were increasingly more likely to report hypertension (66.5% vs. 54.2%), diabetes (28.7% vs. 17.8%), and be overweight/obese (74.1% vs. 58.9%). In age-adjusted logistic regressions, respondents in 2015 were more likely to show cognitive impairment compared to 2000 (OR 1.84, CI 1.20-2.82). Conclusion: SABE respondents showed higher prevalence of cognitive impairment in 2015 compared to respondents of the same age in earlier waves, but differences disappeared after adjusting for chronic disease burden and educational attainment. [less ▲]

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See detailPrevalence of Mild Cognitive Impairment in Latin America and the Caribbean: A Systematic Review
Ribeiro, Fabiana UL; Teixeira-Santos, Carolina; Leist, Anja UL

in Innovation in Aging (2020), 4(S1), 897898

Detailed reference viewed: 62 (2 UL)
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See detailPrevalence of Problem Drug Use and Injecting Drug Use in Luxembourg: A Longitudinal and Methodological Perspective.
Origer, Alain UL; Baumann, Michèle UL

in European Addiction Research (2012), 18

To estimate the prevalence of problem drug use (PDU) and injecting drug use (IDU) in Luxembourg and analyze trends between 1997 and 2009. To assess the feasibility of prevalence estimations based on drug ... [more ▼]

To estimate the prevalence of problem drug use (PDU) and injecting drug use (IDU) in Luxembourg and analyze trends between 1997 and 2009. To assess the feasibility of prevalence estimations based on drug use surveillance systems. Methods: Serial multi-method PDU/IDU prevalence estimations based upon capture-recapture, Poisson regression, multiplier and back-calculation methods. Comparative analysis of methods and assessment of their robustness to variations of external factors. Results: National PDU and IDU prevalence rates were estimated at 6.16/1,000 (95% CI 4.62/1,000 to 7.81/1,000) and 5.68/1,000 (95% CI 4.53/1,000 to 6.85/1,000) inhabitants aged 15–64 years, respectively. Absolute prevalence and prevalence rates of PDU increased between 1997 and 2000 and declined from 2003 onwards, whereas IDU absolute prevalence and prevalence rates witnessed an increasing trend between 1997 and 2007. Conclusions: Drug use surveillance systems can be valuable instruments for the estimation and trend analysis of drug misuse prevalence given multiple methods are applied that rely on serial and representative data from different sources and different settings, control multiple counts and build upon standardized and sustained data collection routines. The described institutional contact indicator revealed to be a useful tool in the context of PDU/IDU prevalence estimations and thus contributes to enhancing evidence-based drug policy planning. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 196 (2 UL)
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See detailPrevalence of Rheumatoid Arthritis in France : 2001
Guillemin, Francis; Saraux, A.; Guggenbuhl, P. et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2005), 64(10), 1427-1430

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See detailPrevalence of SARS-CoV-2 infection in the Luxembourgish population: the CON-VINCE study.
Snoeck, Chantal J.; Vaillant, Michel; Abdelrahman, Tamir et al

E-print/Working paper (2020)

BACKGROUND: After the World Health Organization declared the outbreak of coronavirus disease to be a public health emergency of international concern on January 30, 2020, the first SARS-CoV-2 infection ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: After the World Health Organization declared the outbreak of coronavirus disease to be a public health emergency of international concern on January 30, 2020, the first SARS-CoV-2 infection was detected in Luxembourg on February 29, 2020. Representative population-based data, including asymptomatic individuals for assessing the viral spread and immune response were, however, lacking worldwide. METHODS: Using a panel-based method, we implemented a representative sample of the Luxembourgish population based on age, gender and residency for testing for SARS-CoV-2 infection and antibody status in order to define prevalence irrespective of clinical symptoms. Participants were contacted via email to fill an online questionnaire before biosampling at local laboratories. All participants provided information related to clinical symptoms, epidemiology, socioeconomic and psychological assessments and underwent biosampling, rRT-PCR testing and serology for SARS-CoV-2. RESULTS: We included a total of 1862 individuals in our representative sample of the general Luxembourgish population. Of these, 5 individuals had a current positive result for infection with SARS-CoV-2 based on rRT-PCR. Four of these individuals were oligosymptomatic and one was asymptomatic. Overall we found a positive IgG antibody status in 35 individuals (1.97%), of which 11 reported to be tested positive by rRT-PCR for SARS-CoV-2 previously and showed in addition their IgG positive status also a positive status for IgA. Our data indicate a prevalence of 0.3% for active SARS-CoV-2 infection and an infection rate of 2.15% in the Luxembourgish population between 18 and 79 years of age. CONCLUSIONS: Luxembourgish residents show a low rate of acute infections after 7 weeks of confinement and present with an antibody profile indicative of a more recent immune response to SARS-CoV-2. All infected individuals were oligo- or asymptomatic. Bi-weekly follow-up visits over the next 2 months will inform about the viral spread by a- and oligosymptomatic carriers and the individual changes in the immune profile.Competing Interest StatementThe authors have declared no competing interest.Clinical TrialNCT04379297Funding StatementThe CON-VINCE Study is funded by the Research Fund Luxembourg (FNR; CON-VINCE) and the André Losch Foundation (Luxembourg).Author DeclarationsAll relevant ethical guidelines have been followed; any necessary IRB and/or ethics committee approvals have been obtained and details of the IRB/oversight body are included in the manuscript.YesAll necessary patient/participant consent has been obtained and the appropriate institutional forms have been archived.YesI understand that all clinical trials and any other prospective interventional studies must be registered with an ICMJE-approved registry, such as ClinicalTrials.gov. I confirm that any such study reported in the manuscript has been registered and the trial registration ID is provided (note: if posting a prospective study registered retrospectively, please provide a statement in the trial ID field explaining why the study was not registered in advance).Yes I have followed all appropriate research reporting guidelines and uploaded the relevant EQUATOR Network research reporting checklist(s) and other pertinent material as supplementary files, if applicable.YesDue to ethical concerns, supporting data cannot be made openly available. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 506 (33 UL)
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See detailPrevalence of Spondylarthropathies in France : 2001
Saraux, A.; Guillemin, Francis; Guggenbuhl, P. et al

in Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases (2005), 64(10), 1431-1435

Detailed reference viewed: 58 (1 UL)
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See detailPreventing active re-identification attacks on social graphs via sybil subgraph obfuscation
Mauw, Sjouke UL; Ramirez Cruz, Yunior UL; Trujillo Rasua, Rolando UL

in Knowledge and Information Systems (2022), 64

Active re-identification attacks constitute a serious threat to privacy-preserving social graph publication, because of the ability of active adversaries to leverage fake accounts, a.k.a. sybil nodes, to ... [more ▼]

Active re-identification attacks constitute a serious threat to privacy-preserving social graph publication, because of the ability of active adversaries to leverage fake accounts, a.k.a. sybil nodes, to enforce structural patterns that can be used to re-identify their victims on anonymised graphs. Several formal privacy properties have been enunciated with the purpose of characterising the resistance of a graph against active attacks. However, anonymisation methods devised on the basis of these properties have so far been able to address only restricted special cases, where the adversaries are assumed to leverage a very small number of sybil nodes. In this paper, we present a new probabilistic interpretation of active re-identification attacks on social graphs. Unlike the aforementioned privacy properties, which model the protection from active adversaries as the task of making victim nodes indistinguishable in terms of their fingerprints with respect to all potential attackers, our new formulation introduces a more complete view, where the attack is countered by jointly preventing the attacker from retrieving the set of sybil nodes, and from using these sybil nodes for re-identifying the victims. Under the new formulation, we show that k-symmetry, a privacy property introduced in the context of passive attacks, provides a sufficient condition for the protection against active re-identification attacks leveraging an arbitrary number of sybil nodes. Moreover, we show that the algorithm K-Match, originally devised for efficiently enforcing the related notion of k-automorphism, also guarantees k-symmetry. Empirical results on real-life and synthetic graphs demonstrate that our formulation allows, for the first time, to publish anonymised social graphs (with formal privacy guarantees) that effectively resist the strongest active re-identification attack reported in the literature, even when it leverages a large number of sybil nodes. [less ▲]

See detailPreventing and Resolving Conflicts of Jurisdiction in EU Criminal Law
Ligeti, Katalin UL; Robinson, Gavin UL; European Law Institute

Book published by Oxford University Press (2018)

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See detailPreventing Coercion in E-Voting: Be Open and Commit
Tabatabaei, Masoud UL; Jamroga, Wojciech UL; Ryan, Peter UL

Scientific Conference (2013, March 17)

Detailed reference viewed: 345 (12 UL)
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See detailPreventing Coercion in E-Voting: Be Open and Commit
Jamroga, Wojciech UL; Tabatabaei, Masoud UL

in Proceedings of the 12th International Joint Conference on Electronic Voting (E-Vote-ID) (2016)

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See detailPreventing Frame Fingerprinting in Controller Area Network Through Traffic Mutation
Buscemi, Alessio UL; Turcanu, Ion; Castignani, German UL et al

in IEEE ICC 2022 Workshop - DDINS, Seoul 16-20 May 2022 (2022, May)

The continuous increase of connectivity in commercial vehicles is leading to a higher number of remote access points to the Controller Area Network (CAN) – the most popular in-vehicle network system. This ... [more ▼]

The continuous increase of connectivity in commercial vehicles is leading to a higher number of remote access points to the Controller Area Network (CAN) – the most popular in-vehicle network system. This factor, coupled with the absence of encryption in the communication protocol, poses serious threats to the security of the CAN bus. Recently, it has been demonstrated that CAN data can be reverse engineered via frame fingerprinting, i.e., identification of frames based on statistical traffic analysis. Such a methodology allows fully remote decoding of in-vehicle data and paves the way for remote pre-compiled vehicle-agnostic attacks. In this work, we propose a first solution against CAN frame fingerprinting based on mutating the traffic without applying modifications to the CAN protocol. The results show that the proposed methodology halves the accuracy of CAN frame fingerprinting. [less ▲]

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See detailPreventing Infringements on E-Commerce Marketplaces: proposal of a risk-based approach towards intermediary liablity
Ullrich, Carsten UL

Conference given outside the academic context (2018)

Detailed reference viewed: 99 (1 UL)
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See detailPreventing Overloading Incidents on Smart Grids: A Multiobjective Combinatorial Optimization Approach
Antoniadis, Nikolaos UL; Cordy, Maxime UL; Sifaleras, Angelo et al

in Communications in Computer and Information Science (2020, February 15)

Cable overloading is one of the most critical disturbances that may occur in smart grids, as it can cause damage to the distribution power lines. Therefore, the circuits are protected by fuses so that ... [more ▼]

Cable overloading is one of the most critical disturbances that may occur in smart grids, as it can cause damage to the distribution power lines. Therefore, the circuits are protected by fuses so that, the overload could trip the fuse, opening the circuit, and stopping the flow and heating. However, sustained overloads, even if they are below the safety limits, could also damage the wires. To prevent overload, smart grid operators can switch the fuses on or off to protect the circuits, or remotely curtail the over-producing/over-consuming users. Nevertheless, making the most appropriate decision is a daunting decision-making task, notably due to contractual and technical obligations. In this paper, we define and formulate the overloading prevention problem as a Multiobjective Mixed Integer Quadratically Constrained Program. We also suggest a solution method using a combinatorial optimization approach with a state-of-the-art exact solver. We evaluate this approach for this real-world problem together with Creos Luxembourg S.A., the leading grid operator in Luxembourg, and show that our method can suggest optimal countermeasures to operators facing potential overloading incidents. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 319 (41 UL)