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See detailTechnological Progress, the Supply of Hours Worked, and the Consumption-Leisure Complementarity
Irmen, Andreas UL

Speeches/Talks (2017)

At least since 1870 hours worked per worker declined and real wages increased in many of today’s industrialized countries. The dual nature of technological progress in conjunction with a consumption ... [more ▼]

At least since 1870 hours worked per worker declined and real wages increased in many of today’s industrialized countries. The dual nature of technological progress in conjunction with a consumption-leisure complementarity explains these stylized facts. Technological progress drives real wages up and expands the amount of available con- sumption goods. Enjoying consumption goods increases the value of leisure. Therefore, individuals demand more leisure and supply less labor. This mechanism appears in an OLG-model with two-period lived individuals equipped with per-period utility func- tions of the generalized log-log type proposed by Boppart-Krusell (2016). The optimal plan is piecewise defined and hinges on the wage level. Technological progress moves a poor economy out of a regime with low wages and an inelastic supply of hours worked into a regime where wages increase further and hours worked continuously decline. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 35 (2 UL)
Full Text
See detailTechnological Progress, the Supply ofHours Worked, and the Consumption-Leisure Complementarity
Irmen, Andreas UL

E-print/Working paper (2018)

At least since 1870 hours worked per worker declined and real wages increased in many of today’s industrialized countries. The dual nature of technological progress in conjunction with a consumption ... [more ▼]

At least since 1870 hours worked per worker declined and real wages increased in many of today’s industrialized countries. The dual nature of technological progress in conjunction with a consumption-leisure complementarity explains these stylized facts. Technological progress drives real wages up and expands the amount of available consumption goods. Enjoying consumption goods increases the value of leisure. Therefore, individuals demand more leisure and supply less labor. This mechanism appears in an OLG-model with two-period lived individuals equipped with per-period utility functions of the generalized log-log type proposed by Boppart-Krusell (2016). The optimal plan is piecewise defined and hinges on the wage level. Technological progress moves a poor economy out of a regime with low wages and an inelastic supply of hours worked into a regime where wages increase further and hours worked continuously decline. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 40 (1 UL)
Full Text
See detailTechnological Progress, the Supply ofHours Worked, and the Consumption-Leisure Complementarity
Irmen, Andreas UL

Scientific Conference (2018)

At least since 1870 hours worked per worker declined and real wages increased in many of today’s industrialized countries. The dual nature of technological progress in conjunction with a consumption ... [more ▼]

At least since 1870 hours worked per worker declined and real wages increased in many of today’s industrialized countries. The dual nature of technological progress in conjunction with a consumption-leisure complementarity explains these stylized facts. Technological progress drives real wages up and expands the amount of available consumption goods. Enjoying consumption goods increases the value of leisure. Therefore, individuals demand more leisure and supply less labor. This mechanism appears in an OLG-model with two-period lived individuals equipped with per-period utility functions of the generalized log-log type proposed by Boppart-Krusell (2016). The optimal plan is piecewise defined and hinges on the wage level. Technological progress moves a poor economy out of a regime with low wages and an inelastic supply of hours worked into a regime where wages increase further and hours worked continuously decline. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (1 UL)
Full Text
See detailTechnological risks and political challenges: the emergence of Luxembourg’s satellite policy
Danescu, Elena UL

Scientific Conference (2019, June 29)

In the early 1970s, in a bid to diversify its economy – at that time primarily based on a declining steel industry and a still nascent international financial centre –, the Luxembourg government decided ... [more ▼]

In the early 1970s, in a bid to diversify its economy – at that time primarily based on a declining steel industry and a still nascent international financial centre –, the Luxembourg government decided to invest in the country’s audiovisual sector and to pursue a policy to develop telecommunications satellites that would be used to broadcast European television programmes. This ambitious yet risky objective represented a major challenge in five specific areas: in technological terms (choosing to invest in medium-range rather than the more dominant long-range satellites), in political terms (opting for US hardware and technology at the expense of the European leaders in the field, France and Germany), and with regard to culture (favouring the broadcast of programmes in English over those in French and German), management (the satellites were run via a private company with the government as the only shareholder), and standardisation, regulation and competition (especially at pan-European level). The Société Européenne des Satellites (SES) was finally set up in 1985, and Luxembourg’s first satellite for television broadcasts (GDL/ASTRA) was launched in 1987. Drawing on new sources, this paper looks back at the emergence of the GDL/ASTRA project from a historical perspective, highlighting the main political, financial, technological and regulatory hurdles that had to be overcome, the influence of the project on Luxembourg’s relationship with the USA and with EEC Member States (especially France and Germany but also the UK, which at that time was embarking on the accession process) and its role in the completion of a common market for new media technologies and ultimately in the development of a European audiovisual area. The impact of the policy as a driver for the financial centre (especially the Luxembourg Stock Exchange) and for various niche markets will also be emphasised. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (0 UL)
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Peer Reviewed
See detailTechnological Spillovers of Financial Centers on a Regional Economy: A Macroeconomic Approach Applied to Luxembourg
Bourgain, Arnaud UL; Pieretti, Patrice UL

in Thierstein, Alain; Schamp, Eike (Eds.) Innovation, Finance and Space (2003)

Detailed reference viewed: 42 (0 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe technological sublime and social diversity: Chicago pragmatism as response to a cultural construction of modernity
Tröhler, Daniel UL

in Tröhler, Daniel; Schlag, Thomas; Osterwalder, Fritz (Eds.) Pragmatism and Modernities (2010)

Detailed reference viewed: 44 (1 UL)
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Peer Reviewed
See detailTechnological Theory of Cloud Manufacturing
Kubler, Sylvain UL; Holmström, Jan; Främling, Kary et al

in Borangiu, Theodor (Ed.) Service Orientation in Holonic and Multi Agent Manufacturing and Robotics (2015, November 06)

Over the past decade, a flourishing number of concepts and architectural shifts appeared such as the Internet of Things, Industry 4.0, Big Data, 3D printing, etc. Such concepts are reshaping traditional ... [more ▼]

Over the past decade, a flourishing number of concepts and architectural shifts appeared such as the Internet of Things, Industry 4.0, Big Data, 3D printing, etc. Such concepts are reshaping traditional manufacturing models, which become increasingly network-, service- and intelligent manufacturing-oriented. It sometimes becomes difficult to have a clear vision of how all those concepts are interwoven and what benefits they bring to the global picture (either from a service or business perspective). This paper traces the evolution of the manufacturing paradigms, highlighting the recent shift towards Cloud Manufacturing (CMfg), along with a taxonomy of the technological concepts and technologies underlying CMfg. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 261 (10 UL)
See detailLa technologie blockchain – et les tendances de la décorporéisation en droit et culture
Becker, Katrin UL

in Pistes. Revue de philosophie contemporaine. Éthique, politique, philosophie des techniques (in press), 1

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (0 UL)
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Peer Reviewed
See detailTechnologie der Biogaserzeugung
Greger, Manfred UL; Golkowska, Katarzyna UL

in Revue Technique Luxembourgeoise (2009), 2

Detailed reference viewed: 78 (9 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailTechnologiebasiertes Assessment im Nationalen Bildungspanel
Greiff, Samuel UL

Scientific Conference (2016, March)

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (1 UL)
See detailTechnologien der Deplatzierung im Zeitalter der mobilen Privatisierung
Fickers, Andreas UL

Presentation (2017, October 06)

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (0 UL)
See detailTechnologies de l'information et de la communication dans la longue durée: trajectoires d'innovation et phénomènes de remédiatisation
Griset, Pascal; Fickers, Andreas UL

in Blandin, Claire; Robinet, Francois; Schafer, Valerie (Eds.) Penser l'histoire des médias (2019)

Detailed reference viewed: 48 (1 UL)
See detailTechnologies et évaluation dans l’enseignement supérieur.
Burton, Réginald UL; Blais, JG; Gilles, JL

in Romainville, M (Ed.) Evaluation et enseignement supérieur. (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 47 (6 UL)
See detailTechnologies of dis-involvement in crisis management : objectifying, impersonalizing and desensitizing information from the ground
de Saint-Georges, Ingrid UL; Wallemacq, Anne; Jacques, Jean-Marie

Presentation (2004, July 28)

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (0 UL)