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See detailYoung @ Heart. Choir Singing, Health and Age
Sagrillo, Damien UL

in Steklacs, Janos (Ed.) International HEART 2016 Conference Health – Economy – Art (2016, March 11)

Young @ Heart. Choir Singing and Health The culture of amateur choral music has a long tradition in most countries of Europe. Choral societies grew up in the middle of the 19th century, and members were ... [more ▼]

Young @ Heart. Choir Singing and Health The culture of amateur choral music has a long tradition in most countries of Europe. Choral societies grew up in the middle of the 19th century, and members were young enthusiasts. Following the end of WW II glee clubs seemed to experience its renaissance that lasted until the seventieth. The decline of choir singing began, at least in my country – Luxembourg, about two decades ago, and today choir singing has become a pastime for elder people. In the past, the social aspect of corporate music-making in the area of amateur activities was an important argument of people coming together. Today, the claim for shared cultural activities is replaced by social media and networks, which gain in acceptance already among the older generation. Singing has become a matter of elderly persons. Health issues become more important: Common singing furthers concentration, overcomes isolation, is a continuous support for manifold forms of therapies. My lecture will give an insight into a leisure activity that combines hard work and musical performance based on decades of experience and will also present a famous example: the “Young@Heart-Chorus”. [less ▲]

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See detailYoung adults at risk in Germany: The impact of vocational training on the ethnic gap at labour market entry
Hartung, Anne UL

in Salagean, I.; Lomos, C.; Hartung, Anne (Eds.) The young and the elderly at risk Individual outcomes and contemporary policy challenges in European societies (2015)

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See detailThe Young and the Elderly at Risk: Individual outcomes and contemporary policy challenges in European societies
Salagean, I.; Lomos, C.; Hartung, Anne UL

Book published by Intersentia (2015)

The current retrenchment of the welfare states is buffering the growing demographic and economic pressures in European countries at the expense of the young and the elderly. However, both investment in ... [more ▼]

The current retrenchment of the welfare states is buffering the growing demographic and economic pressures in European countries at the expense of the young and the elderly. However, both investment in the young, which determines a society’s future, and providing public support for the elderly, the most deserving needy group, are seen as musts. This book encompasses a selection of empirical studies reflecting on when and why the young and the elderly are at risk in several (mostly Western) European countries. Contributions in the book examine the educational achievement and the labor market entry of youths, particularly those who have a migration background, the poverty risk experienced by the elderly, especially if they are also immigrants and/or women, the pension outcomes of former cross-border workers, the simulated consequeces of a recent pension benefit reform as well as those of a potential reform including financial assets and housing wealth in old-age income protection, and finally the extent, and possible erosion, of the support for government providing child-care and protecting the elderly. Preface – Wim van Oorschot Introduction – Ioana Salagean, Catalina Lomos & Anne Hartung 1. Does ethnic capital contribute to the educational outcomes of individuals with Turkish background in Europe? – Sait Bayrakdar 2. Young adults at risk in Germany: The impact of vocational training on the ethnic gap at labour market entry – Anne Hartung 3. Poverty among elderly immigrants in Belgium – Line De Witte, Sofie Vanassche & Hans Peeters 4. Integrating life course and pension policy perspectives: The case of poverty among elderly women – Hans Peeters & Wouter de Tavernier 5. Including assets in comparative old age poverty research: How does it change the picture? – Rika Verpoorten 6. The social and budgetary impacts of the recent social security reform in Belgium – Gijs Dekkers, Saskia Weemaes, Nicole Fasquelle & Raphael Desmet 7. Cross-border social security coordination, mobility of labour and pension outcomes – Irina Burlacu & Cathal O'Donoghue 8. Do self-interest, ideology and national context influence opinions on government support for childcare? A multilevel analysis – Wouter de Tavernier 9. Individual attitudes towards welfare states responsibility for the elderly – Nathalie Schuerman Rejoinder: Is intergenerational solidarity under pressure? Comparative analyses of age cleavages in opinions about government support for the young and the old – Tim Reeskens & Wim van Oorschot [less ▲]

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See detailYoung children capitalising on their entire language repertoire for language learning at school
Kirsch, Claudine UL

in Language, Culture and Curriculum (2017), 31(1), 39-55

While translanguaging has been well researched in bilingual settings with older pupils and has been found to contribute to cognitive and personal development, there is little research on translanguaging ... [more ▼]

While translanguaging has been well researched in bilingual settings with older pupils and has been found to contribute to cognitive and personal development, there is little research on translanguaging of young multilinguals. In trilingual Luxembourg, at school, children learn Luxembourgish aged 4, German aged 6 and French aged 7, with the majority not speaking Luxembourgish on school entry. The number of languages to be learned may leave teachers little space to capitalise on home languages and encourage translanguaging. Drawing on qualitative methods, this paper contextualises and examines the practice and purposes of translanguaging of nursery and primary school children who speak a language other than Luxembourgish at home, while they collaboratively produce oral texts on the iPad app iTEO. The data stem from a longitudinal study using a multi-method approach. The findings indicate that the children made use of their multilingual repertoire in order to communicate, construct knowledge and mark their multilingual identity. Translanguaging was a frequent and legitimate practice in both classes although the older children drew less on home languages other than Luxembourgish. The children’s ability to translanguage and their opportunities for doing so were influenced by the multilingual learning environment, the curriculum and the language learning tasks. [less ▲]

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See detailYoung children learning new languages out of school.
Kirsch, Claudine UL

in International Journal of Multilingualism (2006), 3(4), 258-279

Luxembourg is a trilingual country where residents communicate in Luxembourgish, French and German concurrently. Children therefore study these languages at primary school. In this paper I explore how six ... [more ▼]

Luxembourg is a trilingual country where residents communicate in Luxembourgish, French and German concurrently. Children therefore study these languages at primary school. In this paper I explore how six eight-year-old Luxembourgish children use and learn German, French and English in formal and informal settings over a period of one year. Their eagerness to learn and use German and English contrasted with their cautious and formal approach to the learning of French. My findings demonstrate that second language learning in a multilingual country is not an ‘automatic’ or ‘natural’ process but, rather, children’s language behaviour depends on their personal goals, interests, competence, confidence and understanding of what counts as appropriate language use. These factors are influenced by the formal approach to language learning at school. [less ▲]

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See detailYoung children's developing multilingual repertoires and languaging in a preschool in Luxembourg
Mortini, Simone UL

Presentation (2019, March 25)

In trilingual Luxembourg, 63.5% of the children entering formal schooling have a home language other than Luxembourgish. National studies have shown that these children score below average in primary ... [more ▼]

In trilingual Luxembourg, 63.5% of the children entering formal schooling have a home language other than Luxembourgish. National studies have shown that these children score below average in primary school (MENJE, 2017). To raise the children's opportunities, a new law on multilingual education in the early years was voted in 2017. In addition to learning Luxembourgish, young children are now familiarised with French and their home languages are valued. Researchers have called for such inclusive multilingual pedagogies that build on dynamic language arrangements (Garcia & Seltzer, 2016). However, studies have seldom focused on the impact of these innovative pedagogies on young children's developing multilingual repertoires, their interactions with adults and peers, and the children's active role in this process (Schwartz & Gorbatt, 2018). Drawing on a sociocultural perspective, the present paper investigates the languaging and development of the language repertoires of two four-year-old Spanish-speaking children during one year in preschool. Their teacher participated in a professional development programme coordinated by a research project on developing multilingual pedagogies in early childhood (MuLiPEC, 2016-2019). The data stem from 17 days of videography and participant observation of the children's interactions with peers and the teacher during daily routines and from four interviews with the teacher. Data analysis was based on thematic and conversation analysis. The preliminary findings indicate, firstly, that within the teacher's flexible language arrangements, the children frequently translanguaged, drawing on features of five languages and non-verbal communication (e.g. gestures, showing). At the same time, they developed vocabulary, complex sentences and narrative skills in Luxembourgish. Secondly, they showed a metalinguistic awareness and adapted their languaging to their interlocutors. The findings should contribute to the research on languaging and multilingual development in early childhood. Garcia, O., & Seltzer, K. (2016). The Translanguaging current in language education. In B. Kindenberg (ed.) Flersprakighet som resurs (pp. 19-30). Liber. MENJE (2017). Enseignement fondamental - Education differenciee. Statistiques globales et analyse des resultats scolaries - Annee scolaire 2015/2016. MENJE: Luxembourg. Schwartz, M., & Gorbatt, N. (2018). The Role of Language Experts in Novices’ Language Acquisition and Socialization. In M. Schwartz (ed.) Preschool Bilingual Education. Agency Between Children, Teachers, and Parents (pp. 343 - 356). Springer. [less ▲]

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See detailYoung Children’s Ethnifying Practices: An Ethnographic Research in a Daycare Center in Berlin
Seele, Claudia UL

Scientific Conference (2011, August 21)

I will present findings of an ethnographic research that was conducted in a daycare center in Berlin with 22 children from 4 to 6 years of age. Despite being born and raised in Germany, in the dominant ... [more ▼]

I will present findings of an ethnographic research that was conducted in a daycare center in Berlin with 22 children from 4 to 6 years of age. Despite being born and raised in Germany, in the dominant discourse most of them would be represented as ‘migrant children’ or ‘children with migrant background’. They thus come to function as ‘the Other’ in the construction of a normative version of ‘German children’. Family origins, language and physical appearance act as important criteria in this ethnifying of children. Embedded within this discursive framework my research focus however is on the perspectives of the children themselves and how they participate in the social construction of ethnic identities. Participant observation and symbolic group interviews were employed to explore the children’s practical strategies in dealing with ethnified identity ascriptions in everyday peer interactions. In line with the ‘new’ sociological study of childhood (e.g. James & Prout 1990) I perceive of children as competent social actors who do not just passively receive and imitate adult conceptions of the social order but actively and skillfully join in the construction of the social world. The ethnographic data show that children as young as 4 are able to use ethnic ascriptions as a ‘social tool’ (Van Ausdale & Feagin 2001) in their peer interactions. The broad range of practical and situational processes of differentiation and evaluation, of inclusion and exclusion, can be interpreted along a continuum from reproducing to challenging dominant constructions of belonging and ‘the Other’. I argue that ethnicity is not a pre-given fact but practically accomplished and negotiated in children’s social interactions. Thus, the research contributes to our understanding of children’s agency and competence as well as of the relationality, provisionality and context-dependence of children’s identities. [less ▲]

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See detailYoung employment mobility: how young Europeans land on jobs
Skrobanek, Jan; Ardic, Tuba; Vysotskaya, Volha UL

Presentation (2016, September 02)

Researchers and practitioners have contributed a lot to the understanding of the dynamics of labor migration. Moreover, mobilites of younger persons remain at the periphery of the migration research and ... [more ▼]

Researchers and practitioners have contributed a lot to the understanding of the dynamics of labor migration. Moreover, mobilites of younger persons remain at the periphery of the migration research and are overshadowed by how “older” migrants move and why. In this presentation we would like to draw more attention to the mobility of young persons who move in Europe with the purpose of work. In particular, we will explore the young employment mobility in its own way and focus on mobility trajectories of young Europeans by asking ourselves: how they move and why? For that we formulate the central question as: Along their mobility trajectories, what comes across their pathways? What is their “mobility gate”? What do they rely upon in their employment mobility(-ies)? [less ▲]

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See detailYoung people's knowledge on HIV transmission
Berg, Charles UL; Milmeister, Marianne UL

Scientific Conference (2007, September)

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See detailThe Young PI Buzz: Learning from the Organizers of the Junior Principal Investigator Meeting at ISMB-ECCB 2013.
de Ridder, Jeroen; Bromberg, Yana; Michaut, Magali et al

in PLoS computational biology (2013), 9(11), 1003350

Detailed reference viewed: 49 (2 UL)
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See detailYour Moves, Your Device: Establishing Behavior Profiles Using Tensors
Falk, Eric UL; Charlier, Jérémy Henri J. UL; State, Radu UL

in Advanced Data Mining and Applications - 13th International Conference, ADMA 2017 (2017, November)

Smartphones became a person's constant companion. As the strictly personal devices they are, they gradually enable the replacement of well established activities as for instance payments, two factor ... [more ▼]

Smartphones became a person's constant companion. As the strictly personal devices they are, they gradually enable the replacement of well established activities as for instance payments, two factor authentication or personal assistants. In addition, Internet of Things (IoT) gadgets extend the capabilities of the latter even further. Devices such as body worn fitness trackers allow users to keep track of daily activities by periodically synchronizing data with the smartphone and ultimately with the vendor's computational centers in the cloud. These fitness trackers are equipped with an array of sensors to measure the movements of the device, to derive information as step counts or make assessments about sleep quality. We capture the raw sensor data from wrist-worn activity trackers to model a biometric behavior profile of the carrier. We establish and present techniques to determine rather the original person, who trained the model, is currently wearing the bracelet or another individual. Our contribution is based on CANDECOMP/PARAFAC (CP) tensor decomposition so that computational complexity facilitates: the execution on light computational devices on low precision settings, or the migration to stronger CPUs or to the cloud, for high to very high granularity. This precision parameter allows the security layer to be adaptable, in order to be compliant with the requirements set by the use cases. We show that our approach identifies users with high confidence. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 101 (17 UL)
See detailYouth Conflicts and Public Policy Challenges in Western Europe
Willems, Helmut UL; Eckert, Roland

in XXth International CFR Seminar on Social Change and Family Policies, Melbourne, Australia, 19-24 Aug 1984 (1985)

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (0 UL)
See detailYouth Health? History of School Medicine in Geneva: 1884-2004
Thyssen, Geert UL

in Paedagogica Historica (2006), 42(6), 890-892

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (0 UL)
See detailYouth in Europe - A statistical portrait
Desurmont, Arnaud; Margherita, Antonia UL; Alciator, Marco et al

Report (2009)

This publication attempts to draw a portrait of young people living in Europe. ‘Youth in Europe’ is based on data available at EU level, using mainly a broad selection of harmonised data sources available ... [more ▼]

This publication attempts to draw a portrait of young people living in Europe. ‘Youth in Europe’ is based on data available at EU level, using mainly a broad selection of harmonised data sources available at Eurostat. The reader will find statistical information on a wide range of topics relating to youth in Europe, including demographic aspects (ageing of the population, founding a family), health and living conditions, education and starting out in working life, and participation in cultural and social activities. The data presented in ‘Youth in Europe’ show that the situation of young people differs considerably from one country to another, which can be explained by a range of cultural, social and economic factors. This publication aims to encourage further interest and research into the fascinating world of young people in order to better understand the Europe of today and of tomorrow. [less ▲]

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See detailYouth Mobility – experiencing (un)certainties
Kmiotek-Meier, Emilia Alicja UL; Vysotskaya, Volha UL

Scientific Conference (2018, March 19)

Detailed reference viewed: 47 (5 UL)
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See detailYouth on the MOVE?
Nienaber, Birte UL; Bissinger, Jutta UL; Kmiotek, Emilia Alicja UL et al

Conference given outside the academic context (2018)

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (10 UL)