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See detailSustainability of Medium-Sized Language Communities in the age of Globalization: The Czech language
Hofmann, Mahulena UL

in Language Law and Legal Challenges in Medium-Sized Language Communities: A Comparative Perspective (2012)

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See detailSustainability Reporting Out of a Prisoner’s Dilemma
Kaspereit, Thomas UL

in Comby, J.; Eames, K.; Guiherý, L. (Eds.) et al Developing Sustainability (2013)

Listed firms increasingly strive for a sustainable appearance, which has made sustainability reporting very popular in recent years. This would be completely rational if sustainability reporting could ... [more ▼]

Listed firms increasingly strive for a sustainable appearance, which has made sustainability reporting very popular in recent years. This would be completely rational if sustainability reporting could enhance shareholder value. This paper investigates from a theoretical perspective which conditions are sufficient for the individual and collective rationality of sustainability reporting. The Analysis leads to the conclusion that, due to the competition between firms, sustainability reporting generates a separation equilibrium as long as the reporting costs are proportional to the reported level and the marginal costs of reporting differ with the true level of sustainability. Although it might be preferable, a pooling equilibrium with no sustainability reporting cannot be sustained, which is a result of the so-called prisoner’s dilemma that firms find themselves caught within. The most important practical implication of the model is a call for external auditing with high assurance levels to ensure an efficient separation of highly and weakly sustainable firms [less ▲]

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See detailSustainability Research and Interactive Knowledge Generation
JUNG ép. PRELLER, Bérénice UL; Affolderbach, Julia UL; Schulz, Christian UL et al

E-print/Working paper (2014)

Based on experiences from the GreenRegio research project that investigates framework conditions for innovations in sustainable/green building, this working paper explores the potential of interactive and ... [more ▼]

Based on experiences from the GreenRegio research project that investigates framework conditions for innovations in sustainable/green building, this working paper explores the potential of interactive and collaborative methods for knowledge generation and co-production. Engagement with local practi-tioners, private industry, academics, political decision-makers and representatives of the non-profit sector early on in the research process allows researchers to gain better understanding of the re-search object and context. It also creates a platform for (mutual) knowledge exchange. Methodologi-cally, the project incorporates interactive workshops and Delphi-based feedback and validation rounds, that – over the lifespan of the project – offer a mutual learning process further inspired by in-sights and experiences across four case studies in Europe, Australia, and Canada. The exchange and learning processes provide important insights on different forms and pathways of sustainability transi-tions in the building sector to all participants involved in the project, researchers and researched alike. [less ▲]

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See detailSustainability science as a transformative social learning process
König, Ariane UL

in König, Ariane (Ed.) Sustainability science: Key issues (2018)

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See detailSustainability science: Key issues
König, Ariane UL

Book published by Routledge (2018)

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See detailSustainability – The travelling empty-master-signifier
Carr, Constance UL

Scientific Conference (2015, April)

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See detailSustainability – The travelling paradoxical master-signifier
Carr, Constance UL

Scientific Conference (2014)

Sitting at the nexus of the scholarly literatures of discourse theory, integrative planning, and policy mobility, and this paper shows that the usage of sustainability as a master-signifier results not ... [more ▼]

Sitting at the nexus of the scholarly literatures of discourse theory, integrative planning, and policy mobility, and this paper shows that the usage of sustainability as a master-signifier results not only in new policy discourses, but also in further social spatial contradictions. In both Luxembourg and in Switzerland, governing officials are confronted with coordinating development under growth pressure. In this context, sustainability, along with respective integrative planning procedures, arrives as a guiding principle that enables policy makers to clump together certain sets of disassociate problems in attempts to bring so called order out of disorder. While some aggregation may occur, further fragmentation – and new sets of challenges – is the consequence. Sustainability as the master-signifier, thus, performs a quilting function around which policy-makers can orient, bundle certain sets of problems under a single ideology, and attempt order. The ideology has, however, certain material implications. It is a travelling master-signifier. [less ▲]

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See detailSustainability's Coming Home : Preliminary Design Principles for the Sustainable Smart District
Keller, Robert; Röhrich, Felix; Schmidt, Lukas et al

in 14. International Business Informatics Conference (2019)

Consumer trends like local consumption, sharing of property, and environmental awareness change our habits and thereby our surroundings. These trends have their origin in our direct environment, in the ... [more ▼]

Consumer trends like local consumption, sharing of property, and environmental awareness change our habits and thereby our surroundings. These trends have their origin in our direct environment, in the districts of our city or community, where we live and socialize. Cities and districts are changing to “smart cities” and “smart districts” as a part of the ongoing digitalization. These changes offer the possibility to entrench the idea of sustainability and build a platform-based ecosystem for a sustainable smart district. This research aims to identify guidelines in form of preliminary design principles (PDPs) for sustainable smart districts. To achieve this, we conduct a structured literature review. On this basis, we derive and develop PDPs with the help of semi-structured interviews and a non-representative sample of the German population. The resulting nine PDPs describe a first insight into the design of sustainable smart districts. [less ▲]

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See detailSustainability, FinTech & Financial Inclusion
Veidt, Robin UL

Presentation (2019, November 14)

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See detailSustainability, FinTech and Financial Inclusion
Zetzsche, Dirk Andreas UL; Veidt, Robin UL; Buckley, Ross et al

in European Business Organization Law Review (in press)

Detailed reference viewed: 59 (9 UL)
See detailSustainability: problematizing fragility and ephemerality in digital research - Workshop
Schafer, Valerie UL; Fickers, Andreas UL

Presentation (2018, October 26)

404 not found, closed and opaque corpora, websites disappearance after a few years, obsolete tools, problems of maintenance … this workshop wishes to explore the instability of data, of their digital ... [more ▼]

404 not found, closed and opaque corpora, websites disappearance after a few years, obsolete tools, problems of maintenance … this workshop wishes to explore the instability of data, of their digital (digitalized or/and born-digital) heritage, of digital technologies and tools, the numerous transformations of devices, platforms, terms of use and the tensions between this instability and the necessary stability and reproducibility of research. How should researchers deal at the same time with the ephemeral, the flow, the obsolescence and the concern of knowledge production? How is it possible to reconciliate the temporality of research and the short cycles of technologies? This workshop aims at introducing and identifying the challenges of sustainability and durability which are too often underestimated in digital research and rarely presented to students when introducing tools and research methods. This 120 minutes workshop will be organized in three parts as follows: - Identifying the levels, steps, in which sustainability and durability of a digital research are challenged, from the shaping and sharing of corpora to the maintenance of research results and digital productions. This will be based on the participants experiences and on several examples of research projects; - Mapping the issues and existing solutions such as digital research infrastructures, permanent identifiers, licenses, but also obstacles and limits (such as author rights …) that researchers have to face or take into account; - Creating practical guidelines that could be used by scholars and students. This workshop expands a research project conducted by Christine Barats (Céditec, Université Paris- Est Créteil), Andreas Fickers (Head of C2DH, University of Luxembourg), Valérie Schafer (C2DH, University of Luxembourg). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 80 (9 UL)
See detailSustainability? Local opportunities and scalar contradictions
Carr, Constance UL

Presentation (2015)

In 2014, a colleague and I guest edited a Special Issue of Local Environment. Focus was on the urban and local scale as it is often postulated to be the most appropriate site of sustainability ... [more ▼]

In 2014, a colleague and I guest edited a Special Issue of Local Environment. Focus was on the urban and local scale as it is often postulated to be the most appropriate site of sustainability intervention. But we were also interested in mechanisms of change that higher levels of authority are not able to engage. Clearly, there is a rich diversity of initiatives: Ideas are abound, technologies are available, and projects already exist in a variety of forms and at various stages of maturity. In this way, the issue contributes to the growing catalog of sustainability efforts. Significant, however, was that local initiatives must be viewed not as isolated events, but in association the wider multi-scalar contexts that enable them or inhibit them. If making a better planet ultimately means invoking change on a broad scale – which is the broad goal of sustainable development, sustainability, or sustainability transitions – then ideas have to originate with one or a few bodies, and there must be a process of translating the emerged new practice to anchor it at wider-reaching scales. In this way, the general course can be changed. Yet, it is a path that treads the fine line between alternative niches and mainstream, between counter and accepted practice, between the visionary ‘lone (eco)hero’ and conventional operations, between real change in the mainstream and expropriation of the alternative by the mainstream. At this point, a paradox often arises as local initiatives transgress from micro-local to wider, established and well known spheres. This tension – between what enables and what constrains actors interested in sustainability transitions – is the focus of this contribution. [less ▲]

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See detailSustainable building approaches in two city regions - A discursive inquiry of policy legitimation strategies
JUNG ép. PRELLER, Bérénice UL

Scientific Conference (2015, September 02)

Adopting analytical tools of environmental discourses (Hajer, 1997; Dryzeck, 1997), this presentation looks at how the transition towards sustainable buildings is framed in public discourses in two ... [more ▼]

Adopting analytical tools of environmental discourses (Hajer, 1997; Dryzeck, 1997), this presentation looks at how the transition towards sustainable buildings is framed in public discourses in two different city regions: Luxembourg (LU) and Freiburg (DE). The analysis relies on publicly available documents, further contextualised through interviews with key local actors, to outline the particular understanding or vision of sustainable building dominant in each of the case studies. Their material consequence will be further illustrated through concrete examples of development projects. In seeking to better understand the motivations behind these policy choices, the discursive analysis particularly focus on outlining legitimation and justification aspects, arguing that the chosen understanding of sustainable building is prodded by pre-existing local institutional contexts, notably dominant socio-economic actor constellations. [less ▲]

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See detailSustainable Building Transitions in Luxembourg and Freiburg: Local Meanings, Circumstances and Rationales
Preller Geb. Jung, Bérénice Cynthia UL

Doctoral thesis (2018)

Sustainable building has become a subject of high policy emulation to address sustainability challenges. Publications and interventions from international organisations concord in outlining the high share ... [more ▼]

Sustainable building has become a subject of high policy emulation to address sustainability challenges. Publications and interventions from international organisations concord in outlining the high share of greenhouse gas emissions produced by the building sector, while at the same time pointing towards the important leverage for sustainability interventions on the built environment. The realisation of sustainable building crosses serval functional domains: regulatory, economic, cultural, social, natural etc. It requires also to consider buildings in a comprehensive manner from their inception, construction, up to their use and eventual retrofit or demolition but also in relationship with their wider (urban) settings. And last but not least, it requires close interactions with a wide range of stakeholders with different interests and disciplinary perspectives. As a result, sustainable building transformations are a widely diversified agenda. Hence the primary interest, as well as objective of this work, has been to try to better grasp the causes and mechanisms that explain such large differentiation of sustainable building. Drawing on critical sustainable urban literature, I posit sustainable building as diversified because it is a situated and socially mediated object. Conceptually, the work engages with two approaches. First the literature on sustainable socio-technical transitions, in particular the Multi-Level Perspective. Its grounding in co-evolutionary and institutional thinking helps to comprehend the socio-material complexity of sustainable building across a broad range of dimensions and connections. In complementing, and following the adopted socially constructed stance, the work further looks at the discursive constructs used to argue in favour of the transformation towards sustainable building, as the performativity of discourse helps to explain why that change occurs. The operationalisation of the research inquires sustainable building transformations in two European urban areas, Luxembourg (LU) and Freiburg (D), that both focus on sustainable building transformations in their urban policy agenda. Using a mix of qualitative research methods (interviews, cooperative research workshops, and the discourse analysis of a text corpus), I look into detail at how sustainable building policies are played out and how their content varies in relation to the geographical context in which they are situated. Of particular interest to my research is to understand why the transitions towards sustainable building in Luxembourg and Freiburg is a certain way, following the ideologies and interpretations that underlay it. This focus allows to uncover similarities in both Luxembourg and Freiburg where sustainable building is dominantly addressed via technicalities, energy efficiency and green growth, thus tying onto the mainstreamed socio-economic paradigm, despite locally differentiated circumstances. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 102 (7 UL)
See detailSustainable Economic and Monetary Union: the role of social rights
Muñoz, Susana UL

Scientific Conference (2016, December 06)

This paper focuses on one significant aspect of the sustainability of the EMU. it argues that social rights are key factors to support economic integration in the EU and in fine the overall European ... [more ▼]

This paper focuses on one significant aspect of the sustainability of the EMU. it argues that social rights are key factors to support economic integration in the EU and in fine the overall European integration process. [less ▲]

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See detailSustainable economic development and the environment: Theory and evidence
Bertinelli, Luisito UL; Strobl, Eric; Zou, Benteng UL

in Energy Economics (2012), 34(4), 1105-1114

The relationship between growth and pollution is studied through a vintage capital model, where new technologies are more environmentally friendly. We find that once the optimal scrapping age of ... [more ▼]

The relationship between growth and pollution is studied through a vintage capital model, where new technologies are more environmentally friendly. We find that once the optimal scrapping age of technologies is reached, an economy may achieve two possible cases of sustainable development, one in which pollution falls and another in which it stabilizes, or a catastrophic outcome, where environmental quality reaches its lower bound. The outcome will depend on countries’ investment path and their propensity to innovate in environmentally clean technologies, both of which are likely to differ across economies. Empirical results using long time series for a number of developed and developing countries indeed confirm heterogenous experiences in the pollution-output relationship. [less ▲]

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See detailSustainable Everyday Eating Practices from the Perspective of Spatial Identifications.
Reckinger, Rachel UL

in Wille, Christian; Reckinger, Rachel; Kmec, Sonja (Eds.) et al Spaces and Identities in Border Regions. Politics – Media – Subjects. (2016)

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See detailSustainable Finance, EuSEF and the AIFMD
Zetzsche, Dirk Andreas UL; Preiner, Christina

in The AIFM Directive (2020)

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See detailSustainable ICT4D in Africa: Where Do We Go From Here?
Bissyande, Tegawendé François D Assise UL; Ahmat, Daouda; Ouoba, Jonathan et al

in EAI International Conference on e-Infrastructure and e-Services for Developing Countries (2013)

In recent years many researchers in Africa and beyond have devoted considerable resources investigating ways to harness the potential of ICT for improving users’ livelihood in developing areas. Topics and ... [more ▼]

In recent years many researchers in Africa and beyond have devoted considerable resources investigating ways to harness the potential of ICT for improving users’ livelihood in developing areas. Topics and domains of interest appear to be broad with recurring themes and solutions. Unfortunately there are no clear research roadmaps on what is urgent and of the state of the art solutions. In this position paper for the AFRICOMM series of conference, we propose to investigate some priorities for ICT4D in Africa. We believe that our work could motivate researchers and create a synergy around a few important challenges of ICT4D in Africa. [less ▲]

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See detailSustainable Migration Policies
Picard, Pierre M. UL; Worrall, Tim

E-print/Working paper (2011)

This paper considers whether countries might mutually agree a policy of allowing free movement of workers. For the countries to agree, the short run costs must outweighed by the long term benefits that ... [more ▼]

This paper considers whether countries might mutually agree a policy of allowing free movement of workers. For the countries to agree, the short run costs must outweighed by the long term benefits that result from better labor market flexibility and income smoothing. We show that such policies are less likely to be adopted for less risk averse workers and for countries that trade more. More surprisingly we find that some congestion costs can help. This reverses the conventional wisdom that congestion costs tend to inhibit free migration policies. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (3 UL)