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See detailSelf-Regulated Multi-criteria Decision Analysis: An Autonomous Brokerage-Based Approach for Service Provider Ranking in the Cloud
Wasim, Muhammad Umer UL; Ibrahim, Abdallah Ali Zainelabden Abdallah UL; Bouvry, Pascal UL et al

in 9th IEEE International Conference on Cloud Computing Technology and Science (CloudCom 2017), December 11-14, Hong Kong China. (2017)

The use of multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) by online broker to rank different service providers in the Cloud is based upon criteria provided by a customer. However, such ranking is prone to bias ... [more ▼]

The use of multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) by online broker to rank different service providers in the Cloud is based upon criteria provided by a customer. However, such ranking is prone to bias if the customer has insufficient domain knowledge. He/she may exclude relevant or include irrelevant criterion termed as ’misspecification of criterion’. This causes structural uncertainty within the MCDA leading to selection of suboptimal service provider by online broker. To cater such issue, we propose a self-regulated MCDA, which uses notion of factor analysis from the field of statistics. Two QoS based datasets were used for evaluation of proposed model. The prior dataset i.e., feedback from customers, was compiled using leading review websites such as Cloud Hosting Reviews, Best Cloud Computing Providers, and Cloud Storage Reviews and Ratings. The later dataset i.e., feedback from servers, was generated from Cloud brokerage architecture that was emulated using high performance computing (HPC) cluster at University of Luxembourg (HPC @ Uni.lu). The results show better performance of proposed model as compared to its counterparts in the field. The beneficiary of the research would be enterprises that view insufficient domain knowledge as a limiting factor for acquisition of Cloud services. [less ▲]

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See detailSelf-regulation and well-being in old age
Leist, Anja UL

in Zukauskiene, Rita (Ed.) Proceedings of the XIV European Conference on Developmental Psychology. Vilnius, Lithuania, August 18-22, 2009 (2010)

Detailed reference viewed: 47 (7 UL)
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See detailSelf-Regulation of Fundamental Rights? The EU Code of Conduct on Hate Speech, Related Initiatives and Beyond
Quintel, Teresa Alegra UL; Ullrich, Carsten UL

in Ojanen, Tuomas; Petkova, Bilyana (Eds.) Fundamental Rights Protection Online: the Future Regulation of Intermediaries (2020)

This contribution will give a brief overview of EU legislation encouraging self-regulation, such as codes of conduct, communications and recommendations and propose an alternative approach towards ... [more ▼]

This contribution will give a brief overview of EU legislation encouraging self-regulation, such as codes of conduct, communications and recommendations and propose an alternative approach towards fighting illegal content on online platforms, which ventures squarely into co-regulation. There is no formal and straightforward definition on what constitutes illegal hate speech. However, hate speech might be classified as targeting minority groups in a way that promotes violence or social disorder and hatred. The use of social media and online platforms to spread illegal content and hate speech has increased progressively during recent years, as content may be disseminated anonymously and further shared by other users. Therefore, the timely removal or blocking of access to illegal content is essential to limit the wider dissemination and harm of individuals targeted by hate speech. The prominent role of online platforms in revolutionizing modern communication and as influencers of the public opinion has increasingly come to the attention of policy makers. Since online platforms provide an important stage for phenomena such as ‘fake news’, ‘hate speech’ or ‘disinformation’, the pressure to take more responsibility over content hosted by them has grown. The EU Commission took action via several attempts to set certain rules for online intermediaries, mostly relying on non-binding agreements, often in the form of self-regulatory measures, such as codes of conduct, guidelines and recommendations. These measures have raised concerns regarding possible limitations of Freedom of Expression, because they require online platforms to adjudicate on the legality of content, often by relying on automated systems. Meanwhile decisions over the unlawfulness of hate speech and “disinformation” are often notoriously difficult. The deployment of algorithms to analyse the content generated on platforms, such as recognition and filtering technologies, bear risks and pitfalls of automated compliance solutions. Although the use of algorithms to monitor content online still happens based on the “human-in-the-loop principle”, the diligence and efficiency with which illegal content can be reviewed is also dependent on the financial capacity and resources of each company. In addition, these privatized removal procedures maybe influenced by commercial interests and lack effective appeals mechanisms. All these issues throw up serious questions about the democratic legitimacy of self-regulatory removal procedures An alternative solution, proposed in this article, would require platforms to apply a risk-based approach to preventing and removing illegal content. The norms and standards of such an approach would be based on duty of care and be subject to regulatory oversight. It is suggested that the current self-regulatory proposals be replaced by co-regulatory solutions. [less ▲]

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See detailSelf-regulatory strategies and well-being. Retaining a sense of mastery and satisfaction in old age
Leist, Anja UL; Ferring, Dieter UL; Filipp, Sigrun-Heide

in Gerontologist (2009), 49(S2), 8-8

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See detailSelf-reported dependence on mobile phones in young adults: A European cross-cultural empirical survey.
Lopez-Fernandez, Olatz; Kuss, Daria J.; Romo, Lucia et al

in Journal of behavioral addictions (2017), 6(2), 168-177

Background and aims Despite many positive benefits, mobile phone use can be associated with harmful and detrimental behaviors. The aim of this study was twofold: to examine (a) cross-cultural patterns of ... [more ▼]

Background and aims Despite many positive benefits, mobile phone use can be associated with harmful and detrimental behaviors. The aim of this study was twofold: to examine (a) cross-cultural patterns of perceived dependence on mobile phones in ten European countries, first, grouped in four different regions (North: Finland and UK; South: Spain and Italy; East: Hungary and Poland; West: France, Belgium, Germany, and Switzerland), and second by country, and (b) how socio-demographics, geographic differences, mobile phone usage patterns, and associated activities predicted this perceived dependence. Methods A sample of 2,775 young adults (aged 18-29 years) were recruited in different European Universities who participated in an online survey. Measures included socio-demographic variables, patterns of mobile phone use, and the dependence subscale of a short version of the Problematic Mobile Phone Use Questionnaire (PMPUQ; Billieux, Van der Linden, & Rochat, 2008). Results The young adults from the Northern and Southern regions reported the heaviest use of mobile phones, whereas perceived dependence was less prevalent in the Eastern region. However, the proportion of highly dependent mobile phone users was more elevated in Belgium, UK, and France. Regression analysis identified several risk factors for increased scores on the PMPUQ dependence subscale, namely using mobile phones daily, being female, engaging in social networking, playing video games, shopping and viewing TV shows through the Internet, chatting and messaging, and using mobile phones for downloading-related activities. Discussion and conclusions Self-reported dependence on mobile phone use is influenced by frequency and specific application usage. [less ▲]

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See detailSelf-reported dieting success is associated with cardiac autonomic regulation in current dieters
Meule, Adrian; Lutz, Annika UL; Vögele, Claus UL et al

in Appetite (2012), 59(2)

Restrained eating, eating disorders and obesity have been associated with cardiac autonomic dysregulation. The current study investigated cardiac autonomic regulation in current dieters. Female students ... [more ▼]

Restrained eating, eating disorders and obesity have been associated with cardiac autonomic dysregulation. The current study investigated cardiac autonomic regulation in current dieters. Female students (N = 50) indicated if they were currently trying to control their weight and completed the Perceived Self-Regulatory Success in Dieting Scale (PSRS). Heart beat intervals were recorded during two 10 min relaxation periods from which parameters of vagal-cardiac control (high frequency power in normalized units, HF n.u.) and sympathovagal balance (ratio of low and high frequency power, LF/HF) were calculated. In current dieters, self-reported dieting success was positively associated with HF and negatively associated with LF/HF. These associations were independent of current body-mass and food deprivation (i.e. hours since the last meal). We conclude that vagal-cardiac control reflects self-regulatory strength, rather than nutritional status, in current dieters. [less ▲]

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See detailSelf-reporting and measurement of body mass index in adolescents: refusals and validity, and the possible role of socioeconomic and health-related factors.
Chau, Nearkasen; Mayet, A; Baumann, Michèle UL

in BMC Public Health (2013), 13(1), 815-829

Body mass index assessment using self-reported height and weight (BMIsr) can encounter refusals and under/over-reporting while for assessment with measured data (BMIm) refusals can be more frequent. This ... [more ▼]

Body mass index assessment using self-reported height and weight (BMIsr) can encounter refusals and under/over-reporting while for assessment with measured data (BMIm) refusals can be more frequent. This could relate to socioeconomic and health-related factors. We explored these issues by investigating numerous potential factors: gender, age, family structure, father's occupation, income, physical/sports activity, subjective weight perception, school performance, unhealthy behaviours, physical/psychological health, social relationships, living environment, having sustained violence, sexual abuse, and involvement in violence. The sample included 1559 adolescents from middle schools in north-eastern France. They completed a questionnaire including socioeconomic and health-related data, self-reported height/weight, measured height/weight, and weight perception (participation rate 94%). Data were analysed using logistic regression models. BMIsr encountered under-reporting (with change in BMI category, 11.8%), over-reporting (6.0%), and reporting refusals (3.6%). BMIm encountered more numerous refusals (7.9%). Reporting refusal was related to living with a single parent, low school performance, lack of physical/sports activity, sustained violence, poor psychological health, and poor social relationships (gender/age-adjusted odds ratios 1.95 to 2.91). Further to these factors, measurement refusal was related to older age, having divorced/separated parents, a father being a manual worker/inactive, insufficient family income, tobacco/cannabis use, involvement in violence, poor physical health, and poor living environment (1.30 to 3.68). Under-reporting was related to male gender, involvement in violence, poor psychological health, and overweight/obesity (as assessed with BMIm) (1.52 to 11). Over-reporting was related to male gender, younger age, alcohol consumption, and underweight (1.30 to 5.35). Weight perception was linked to reporting refusals and under/over-reporting, but slightly linked to measurement refusal. The contributions of socioeconomic and health-related factors to the associations of weight perception with reporting refusal and under/over-reporting ranged from -82% to 44%. There were substantial discrepancies in the associations between socioeconomic/health-related factors and overweight/obesity assessed with BMIsr and BMIm. BMIsr and BMIm were affected by numerous biases related to vulnerability which were also obesity risk factors. BMIsr encountered under/over-reporting which were related to some socioeconomic and health-related factors, weight perception, and BMIm. BMIm was more affected by refusals than BMIsr due to socioeconomic and health-related factors. Further research is needed. [less ▲]

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See detailSelf-reports of students’ inclusion at school compared with teacher, mother and father ratings: A multitrait-multimethod analysis
Schwab, Susanne; Zurbriggen, Carmen UL; Venetz, Martin

in Journal of School Psychology (2020), 82(1), 116

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See detailSelfitis and behavioural addiction: A plea for terminological and conceptual rigour.
Starcevic, Vladan; Billieux, Joël UL; Schimmenti, Adriano

in The Australian and New Zealand journal of psychiatry (2018), 52(10), 919-920

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See detailSelfitis, selfie addiction, Twitteritis: Irresistible appeal of medical terminology for problematic behaviours in the digital age
Starcevic, Vladan; Billieux, Joël UL; Schimmenti, Adriano

in Australian & New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry (2018), 52(5), 408-409

Behaviours that are performed compulsively and repetitively and are associated with certain negative consequences have been a conceptual challenge for psychopathology. They are usually labelled as ... [more ▼]

Behaviours that are performed compulsively and repetitively and are associated with certain negative consequences have been a conceptual challenge for psychopathology. They are usually labelled as behavioural addictions, although this term has been vague, misused and applied to an exceptionally wide variety of activities (Starcevic, 2016). A similar trend to medicalise problematic behaviours has appeared more recently, with an emergence of ‘selfitis’ (Balakrishnan and Griffiths, in press). This article draws attention to these troublesome tendencies and aims to shed more light on their origin and implications. [less ▲]

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See detail"Selig die Armen im Geiste"
Weber, Jean-Marie UL

Article for general public (2017)

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See detailSelig die luxemburgische Filmhistoriographie...
Majerus, Benoît UL

in Forum für Politik, Gesellschaft und Kultur in Luxemburg (2006), (253), 57--58

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See detailSelling the region as a hub: the promises, beliefs and contradictions of economic development strategies attracting logistics and flows
Hesse, Markus UL

in Cidell, Julie; Prytherch, David (Eds.) Transport, Mobility, and the Production of Urban Space (2015)

This chapter deals with the policy and governance dimension of logistics and freight distribution (including services such as trucking, warehousing, freight forwarding, container handling, and the like ... [more ▼]

This chapter deals with the policy and governance dimension of logistics and freight distribution (including services such as trucking, warehousing, freight forwarding, container handling, and the like), related land uses, and circulation modes. Based on case studies of two regions in the Netherlands and Belgium, it examines how such strategies are being pursued and explores the way in which logistics are discursively framed and thus communicatively constructed. The chapter views logistics as a spatial imaginary, imbued with meanings of modernity, growth, and prosperity, making promises with which local policy endeavours to get the political process going. [less ▲]

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See detailSelling to strategic consumers: on the benefits of consumers’ valuation uncertainty and abundant inventory
Hermel, Dror; Mantin, Benny UL

in Journal of Revenue and Pricing Management (2017)

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See detailSemantic Analysis of Spoken Input Using Markov Logic Networks
Despotovic, Vladimir UL; Walter, Oliver; Haeb-Umbach, Reinhold

in Proceedings of the 16th Annual Conference of the International Speech Communication Association (INTERSPEECH 2015) (2015, September)

We present a semantic analysis technique for spoken input using Markov Logic Networks (MLNs). MLNs combine graphical models with first-order logic. They are particularly suitable for providing inference ... [more ▼]

We present a semantic analysis technique for spoken input using Markov Logic Networks (MLNs). MLNs combine graphical models with first-order logic. They are particularly suitable for providing inference in the presence of inconsistent and in- complete data, which are typical of an automatic speech recognizer’s (ASR) output in the presence of degraded speech. The target application is a speech interface to a home automation system to be operated by people with speech impairments, where the ASR output is particularly noisy. In order to cater for dysarthric speech with non-canonical phoneme realizations, acoustic representations of the input speech are learned in an unsupervised fashion. While training data transcripts are not required for the acoustic model training, the MLN training requires supervision, however, at a rather loose and abstract level. Results on two databases, one of them for dysarthric speech, show that MLN-based semantic analysis clearly outperforms baseline approaches employing non-negative matrix factorization, multinomial naive Bayes models, or support vector machines. [less ▲]

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See detailSemantic and Relational Spaces in Science of Science: Deep Learning Models for Article Vectorisation
Kozlowski, Diego UL; Dusdal, Jennifer UL; Pang, Jun UL et al

E-print/Working paper (2020)

Over the last century, we observe a steady and exponentially growth of scientific publications globally. The overwhelming amount of available literature makes a holistic analysis of the research within a ... [more ▼]

Over the last century, we observe a steady and exponentially growth of scientific publications globally. The overwhelming amount of available literature makes a holistic analysis of the research within a field and between fields based on manual inspection impossible. Automatic techniques to support the process of literature review are required to find the epistemic and social patterns that are embedded in scientific publications. In computer sciences, new tools have been developed to deal with large volumes of data. In particular, deep learning techniques open the possibility of automated end-to-end models to project observations to a new, low-dimensional space where the most relevant information of each observation is highlighted. Using deep learning to build new representations of scientific publications is a growing but still emerging field of research. The aim of this paper is to discuss the potential and limits of deep learning for gathering insights about scientific research articles. We focus on document-level embeddings based on the semantic and relational aspects of articles, using Natural Language Processing (NLP) and Graph Neural Networks (GNNs). We explore the different outcomes generated by those techniques. Our results show that using NLP we can encode a semantic space of articles, while with GNN we are able to build a relational space where the social practices of a research community are also encoded. [less ▲]

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See detailSemantic annotation for places in LBSN through graph embedding
Wang, Yan; Qin, Zongxu; Pang, Jun UL et al

in Proceedings of the 26th ACM International Conference on Information and Knowledge Management - CIKM'17 (2017)

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See detailSemantic associations between arithmetic and space: Evidence from temporal order judgements.
Andres, Michael; Salvaggio, Samuel; Lefèvre, Nathalie et al

in Memory & cognition (2020), 48(3), 361-369

Spatial biases associated with subtraction or addition problem solving are generally considered as reflecting leftward or rightward attention shifts along a mental numerical continuum, but an alternative ... [more ▼]

Spatial biases associated with subtraction or addition problem solving are generally considered as reflecting leftward or rightward attention shifts along a mental numerical continuum, but an alternative hypothesis not implying spatial attention proposes that the operator (plus or minus sign) may favour a response to one side of space (left or right) because of semantic associations. We tested these two accounts in a series of temporal order judgement experiments that consisted in the auditory presentation of addition or subtraction problems followed 200 ms (Experiments 1-2) or 800 ms (Experiment 3) later by the display of two lateralized targets in close temporal succession. To dissociate the side where the operation first brought their attention from the side they had to respond to, we asked participants to report which of the left or right target appeared first or last on screen. Under the attention-orienting account, addition should elicit more rightward responses than subtraction when participants have to focus on the first target, but more leftward responses when they have to focus on the last target, because the latter is opposite to the side where the operation first brought their attention. Under the semantic account, addition should elicit more rightward responses than subtraction, no matter the focus is on the first or last target, because participants should systematically favour the side conceptually linked to the operator. The results of the three experiments converge to indicate that, in lateralized target detection tasks, the spatial biases induced by arithmetic operations stem from semantic associations. [less ▲]

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See detailSemantic based DNS Forensics
Marchal, Samuel UL; François, Jérôme UL; State, Radu UL et al

in Proceedings of the IEEE International Workshop on Information Forensics and Security (2012, December)

In network level forensics, Domain Name Service (DNS) is a rich source of information. This paper describes a new approach to mine DNS data for forensic purposes. We propose a new technique that leverages ... [more ▼]

In network level forensics, Domain Name Service (DNS) is a rich source of information. This paper describes a new approach to mine DNS data for forensic purposes. We propose a new technique that leverages semantic and natural language processing tools in order to analyze large volumes of DNS data. The main research novelty consists in detecting malicious and dangerous domain names by evaluating the semantic similarity with already known names. This process can provide valuable information for reconstructing network and user activities. We show the efficiency of the method on experimental real datasets gathered from a national passive DNS system. [less ▲]

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See detailSemantic Exploration of DNS
Marchal, Samuel UL; François, Jérôme UL; Wagner, Cynthia UL et al

in Proceedings of the 11th International IFIP TC 6 Networking Conference, Prague, Czech Republic, May 21-25 2012 (2012, May)

The DNS structure discloses useful information about the organization and the operation of an enterprise network, which can be used for designing attacks as well as monitoring domains supporting malicious ... [more ▼]

The DNS structure discloses useful information about the organization and the operation of an enterprise network, which can be used for designing attacks as well as monitoring domains supporting malicious activities. Thus, this paper introduces a new method for exploring the DNS domains. Although our previous work described a tool to generate existing DNS names accurately in order to probe a domain automatically, the approach is extended by leveraging semantic analysis of domain names. In particular, the semantic distributional similarity and relatedness of sub-domains are considered as well as sequential patterns. The evaluation shows that the discovery is highly improved while the overhead remains low, comparing with non semantic DNS probing tools including ours and others. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 127 (0 UL)