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See detail«Student's QuAlity of Life and Employability Skills»: SQALES un dispositif et un instrument au service des universités.
Amara, Marie-Emmanuelle UL; Baumann, Michèle UL

in Revista de cercetare si interventie social (2010), 28

Underpinned by reforms initiated under the Bologna process, the European universities today have to develop student's skills and to prepare them for sustainable employment. In this article, we try to ... [more ▼]

Underpinned by reforms initiated under the Bologna process, the European universities today have to develop student's skills and to prepare them for sustainable employment. In this article, we try to illustrate the changing roles of universities, highlighting the importance of the concept of competences. We present the first use of SQALES (process and tool) among students from three European universities (Luxembourg, Belgium, Romania) entering in their first year of social sciences study. Our results show that the evaluation of the employability skills is possible and can even be recommended as a guide to adjusting curricula and to implementing programmes of assistance tailored to identify student needs. [less ▲]

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See detailStudent-driven Inquiry-based Science Education in Luxembourg Primary School Contexts
Wilmes, Sara UL

Doctoral thesis (2017)

This study examined the use of a student-driven inquiry-based science education instructional approach designed specifically to meet the contextualized needs of Luxembourg primary schools. The key issues ... [more ▼]

This study examined the use of a student-driven inquiry-based science education instructional approach designed specifically to meet the contextualized needs of Luxembourg primary schools. The key issues, namely an increasing linguistically diverse student population and limited instructional time for science, were considered in the design of the instructional approach. Drawing on theories of dialogic inquiry, the instructional approach engages students in asking questions and designing investigations to build their science understanding. This interpretive qualitative study utilized a multi-perspective approach to analyse how teachers used the instructional approach in their classrooms and explored two overarching research questions, first, what instructional opportunities does Science Workshop, an inquiry-based student-driven science instructional approach, afford when used in Luxembourg primary classrooms? And second, what does analysis of interactions in these contexts reveal about inquiry-based science instruction in multilingual classrooms? Qualitative methodologies, specifically case studies of classroom implementation, were used to examine the use of the program teachers’ adaptations of the program in their classrooms. Bakhtinian notions of heteroglossia and dialogic pedagogies were used as lenses to examine the instructional opportunities afforded. Interaction analysis was used to examine instruction in a focal classroom when the inquiry-based approach was used. Analyses rooted in sociocultural theoretical frameworks of science and language learning revealed three key contributions toward the use of IBSE in Luxembourg primary schools. First, the key characteristics of teacher professional learning opportunities that supported teachers’ use of the program in Luxembourg, which included workshops, material support, and opportunities to share implementation cases were identified. Second, the ways in which ritualized instructional components afford students spaces to engage on micro-scales in building synchronous interactions during science investigations were revealed. Third, that the science notebooks can position students to engage in dialogic discussions surrounding science investigations was shown through detailed analysis. Taken together, these interrelated points contribute to an understanding of the use of student-driven instructional approaches in multilingual science classrooms in general, while revealing implications for the use of inquiry-based science instructional approaches in Luxembourg primary schools specifically. [less ▲]

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See detailStudentische Lebenswelten in den Universitätskulturen Frankreichs, Deutschlands und Nordamerikas Ein Werkstattbericht
Revilla, Michelle; Schreiber, Catherina UL

in Hayes, Peter; Gammal, Jeal El (Eds.) Universitätskulturen – L’Université en perspective – The Future of the University (2012)

Der Beitrag liefert einen Vergleich studentischer Lebenswelten in den Universitätskulturen Deutschlands, Frankreichs und der USA, basierend auf Diskussionsergebnissen des Transatlantischen Dialogs 2010 ... [more ▼]

Der Beitrag liefert einen Vergleich studentischer Lebenswelten in den Universitätskulturen Deutschlands, Frankreichs und der USA, basierend auf Diskussionsergebnissen des Transatlantischen Dialogs 2010. Hierbei soll es vor allem darum gehen, in international vergleichender Perspektive Diskrepanzen und Ähnlichkeiten in den studentischen Lebenswelten aufzuspüren. Ausgehend von der Individualisierungsthese, die von einem zunehmenden Rückzug der einzelnen Studierenden aus der studentischen Gemeinschaft ausgeht, und der Pluralisierungsthese, die die Universität nur als einen Teil vielfältiger Lebenswelten der Studierenden sieht, sollen vor allem drei Dimensionen des Themas untersucht werden: zunächst eine räumliche Dimension, danach Fragen der studentischen Versorgung und schließlich Fragen der studentischen Identifikation, Integration und Segregation. [less ▲]

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See detailStudentischen Schreiben erforschen und lehren: Grundlagenforschung und ihre Umsetzung in ein Kursprogramm
Gruber, Helmut; Huemer, Birgit UL

in Zeitschrift für Hochschuldidaktik (2015)

This paper presents the results of three research projects on students‘ academic writing at the university. In the first two projects, students’ writing in three social science disciplines was ... [more ▼]

This paper presents the results of three research projects on students‘ academic writing at the university. In the first two projects, students’ writing in three social science disciplines was investigated. In the third project, these results were translated into a writing course for students which eventually lead to the development of a writing pedagogy approach which facilitates to teach discipline-specific as well as general fundamentals of academic writing to students of different disciplines in one course program. [less ▲]

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See detailStudents delay their duties, but also personal projects: Types of students' delayed and completed everyday actions
Grund, Axel UL; Schmid, Sebastian; Klingsieck, Katrin B. et al

in Zeitschrift für Entwicklungspsychologie und Padagogische Psychologie (2012), 44(4), 192-208

Research on procrastination focuses nearly exclusively on the delay of actions that are perceived as externally imposed obligations, which are postponed in favor of more attractive actions. Using the ... [more ▼]

Research on procrastination focuses nearly exclusively on the delay of actions that are perceived as externally imposed obligations, which are postponed in favor of more attractive actions. Using the example of students' everyday actions we investigated whether this conceptualization neglects certain phenomenological facets. 398 college students were asked to describe delayed and instead completed everyday actions of a specific dilatory episode with respect to 35 characteristics. Subsequently, latent-profile analysis was used to explore whether typical action profiles could be differentiated. Three types of both delayed and completed actions were identified. The former could be characterized as duties, personal projects, and physical activities; the latter as recreation, socializing, and duties, in turn. The profiles of personal projects and physical activities thereby indicate that the scope of delayed actions is broader than usually presumed. It is argued that the conceptualization and assessment of procrastination should be extended with respect to these types of action. [less ▲]

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See detailStudents in Anger - How do teachers' provocations influence anger regulation?
Germar, M.; Steffgen, Georges UL

Poster (2009, November)

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See detailStudents Social Origins and Targeted Grade Inflation
Tampieri, Alessandro UL

E-print/Working paper (2013)

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See detailStudents Social Origins and Targeted Grade Inflation
Tampieri, Alessandro UL

Presentation (2013)

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See detailStudents’ affect and motivation: Assessment, structure, and development
Gogol, Katarzyna UL

Doctoral thesis (2016)

Students’ affect and motivation are key determinants of academic effort, academic choices, and academic success. The present dissertation scrutinizes students’ affect and motivation with respect to (a ... [more ▼]

Students’ affect and motivation are key determinants of academic effort, academic choices, and academic success. The present dissertation scrutinizes students’ affect and motivation with respect to (a) possibilities of economic assessment, (b) structure, and (c) development. To this end, the present dissertation focusses on three central affective-motivational constructs that have a long tradition in educational science and are not only important with respect to students’ learning, but are also considered to be vital learning outcomes themselves: academic self-concept, academic interest and academic anxiety. This dissertation includes three studies that are based on large-scale data sets. In the first study, we examined the feasibility of short scales to assess affective-motivational constructs. This is an important research question, as testing time in educational research is typically scarce, which makes the use of long scales problematic. Specifically, we developed three-item and single-item scales for general and subject-specific (i.e., mathematics, German, French) academic anxieties and academic self-concepts and evaluated their psychometric properties by systematic comparison with corresponding long scales. Our results showed that (1) all three-item scales showed satisfactory reliabilities and substantial correlations with long scales, (2) the reliabilities and correlations of single-item measures were somewhat lower. Importantly, however, (3) the correlational patterns of the three-item as well as single-item scales with important students’ characteristics (e.g., gender, school satisfaction, achievement) were similar to those obtained with the corresponding long scales. We concluded therefore that when a study design requires short measures, three-item scales and perhaps even single items may be used as reasonable alternatives for assessing academic anxiety and academic self-concept. The second study tackled the question of structural models of students’ affect and motivation. With regard to academic self-concept, much research has been devoted to the structural conceptualization of this construct. Current structural models consider academic self-concept to be not only subject-specific by nature but also hierarchically organized with general academic self-concept operating at the apex of the hierarchy. Although theoretical considerations and consistent correlational patterns of academic interest and academic anxiety measures indicate that these constructs show similar structural characteristics to academic self-concept, structural models that can account for and test these characteristics are missing. Therefore, first, we specified and examined structural models of academic self-concept, academic interest, and academic anxiety, separately. Our results underscored empirically the structural similarities between the constructs. Furthermore, theoretical predictions and empirical results indicate interrelations between the different affective-motivational constructs. In order to properly examine the constructs’ interrelations, the multidimensional and hierarchical organization of the constructs needs to be taken into account. Therefore, in the next step, we developed an integrative model which provides a comprehensive formal psychometric representation to capture and analyze the complex interplay of general and subject-specific (i.e., mathematics, French, and German) components across academic self-concept, academic interest, and academic anxiety. Finally, we validated the integrative model with respect to indicators of students’ achievement. In the third study we investigated the developmental dynamics of students’ affect and motivation from Grade 7 to 9. Importantly, in previous developmental research the multidimensional and hierarchical organization of the constructs was rarely taken into account. Consequently, little is known about the manifold developmental dynamics of general and subject-specific components of academic self-concept, academic interest, and academic anxiety. Therefore, we applied longitudinal models that capture the hierarchical and subject-specific structure of these constructs to contribute to a fuller and more nuanced understanding of their developmental processes. The investigated constructs showed moderate differential stabilities at the general and subject-specific levels. Further, the development of academic self-concept, academic interest, and academic anxiety seems to be characterized neither by top-down nor bottom-up developmental processes. Rather, general and subject-specific components of the constructs in Grade 9 were shown to be primarily a function of the corresponding components in Grade 7. However, there proved to be several negative ipsative developmental processes across different school subjects. [less ▲]

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See detailStudents' beliefs and attitudes toward mathematics across time: A longitudinal examination of the theory of planned behavior
Niepel, Christoph UL; Burrus, Jeremy; Greiff, Samuel UL et al

in Learning and Individual Differences (2018), 63

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See detailStudents’ Complex Problem-Solving Abilities: Their Structure and Relations to Reasoning Ability and Educational Success
Sonnleitner, Philipp UL; Keller, Ulrich UL; Martin, Romain UL et al

in Intelligence (2013), 41(5), 289-305

Complex Problem Solving (CPS) is considered to be a promising candidate for capturing higher order thinking skills that are emphasized in new educational curricula but are not adequately measured by ... [more ▼]

Complex Problem Solving (CPS) is considered to be a promising candidate for capturing higher order thinking skills that are emphasized in new educational curricula but are not adequately measured by traditional intelligence tests. However, little is known about its psychometric structure and its exact relation to intelligence and educational success—especially in student populations. This study is among the first to use a large and representative sample of secondary school students (N = 563) to examine different measurement models of CPS—that conceptualize the construct as either faceted or hierarchical—and their implications for the construct’s validity. Results showed that no matter which way it was conceptualized, CPS was substantially related to reasoning and to different indicators of educational success. Controlling for reasoning within a joint hierarchical measurement model, however, revealed that the impressive external validity was largely attributable to the variance that CPS shares with reasoning, suggesting that CPS has only negligible incremental validity over and above traditional intelligence scales. On the basis of these results, the value of assessing CPS within the educational context is discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailStudents' Dropout regarding Academic Employability Skills and Satisfaction Against
Amara, Marie-Emmanuelle UL; Karavdic, Senad UL; Baumann, Michèle UL

in Pracana, Clara; Silva, Liliana (Eds.) International psychological Applications and Trends (2013)

With the Lisbon and Bologna processes, studies completion and sustainable employability of students became priorities for European universities. For the Council of European Union, the share of 30-40 year ... [more ▼]

With the Lisbon and Bologna processes, studies completion and sustainable employability of students became priorities for European universities. For the Council of European Union, the share of 30-40 year olds with tertiary educational attainment should be at least 40% by 2020. The young Luxembourg University needs to understand why some students choose to leave without a diploma. Our aim was to analyse the relationships between self-perceiving of the academic employability skills (AES), self-related global quality of life (GQoL) and satisfaction towards against university services (SUS) among persisting and non-persisting students. Design: All freshmen (947) from the three Faculties of Luxembourg University (Sciences & Technology, Law & Finances and Social Sciences) were invited to participate to a cross-sectional survey that took place at beginning of the second semester. Methods: The persisting <br />students were requested to complete an online questionnaire and those who had dropped out during the first semester (non-registered for the second semester) were contacted to responding at the same questions including socio-demographics characteristics: age; sex; nationality (yes/no); work (yes/no); father’s and mother's occupational level and education. A discriminant analysis was undertaken using: the AES scale-6 items (Cronbach’s alpha 0.81); the level of GQoL (1 item, values from 1 “very bad” to 5 “very good”) and the SUS scale-3 items (Cronbach’s alpha 0.74). Findings: 99 persisting students and 68 dropouts have responding. There's no significant age difference between these 2 groups (mean 21.12 years old). Dropouts are more likely young men (55.9% vs. 39.4% persisting, p = 0.036) and have a job (58.2% vs. 3.6% persisting, p = 0.000). Their GQoL is higher (83.3/100 vs. 78.1/100 persisting, p = 0.032), but their AES are lower (55.2/100 vs. 67.3/100 persisting, p°= 0.000). Among them, AES and SUS are positively correlated (correlation 0.414; p = 0.000). Conclusions: Contrary to what described in literature, dropouts are not older than persisting students. They’ve a poorer perception of their employability skills, they're less satisfied with university services (like reputation of university, of faculty and teaching quality). However, they've a better quality of life and much of them have a gainful work. These findings are in line <br />with recent studies suggesting that perceptions of quality of higher education have an impact on students’ satisfaction and behavioral intentions. Further researches will determine nature of links between academic services, employability skills and dropout. [less ▲]

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See detailStudents' exploration strategies in computer-simulated complex problem environments: A latent class approach
Greiff, Samuel UL; Molnár, Gyöngyvér; Martin, Romain UL et al

in Computers & Education (2018), 126

Complex problem solving (CPS) is considered an important educational achievement indicator. Previous research has indicated that CPS performance depends to a substantial extent on the way students explore ... [more ▼]

Complex problem solving (CPS) is considered an important educational achievement indicator. Previous research has indicated that CPS performance depends to a substantial extent on the way students explore problem environments. In this study, we investigated qualitative differences in the way students interact with such environments. In a sample of N = 2226 Hungarian students in Grades 6 to 8, we applied a latent class approach to investigate the use of the principle of isolated variation as an exploration strategy across six CPS tasks that were developed within the MicroDYN approach. Six qualitatively different class profiles emerged: proficient explorers, intermediate explorers, low-performing explorers, rapid learners, emerging explorers, and nonpersisting explorers. We further validated the profiles by comparing the latent classes with regard to students' overall CPS performance and additional indicators of task exploration. In analyzing age-related and gender differences on a cross-sectional level, we found only a small progression toward better performing class profiles from Grade 6 to Grade 8 (e.g., 14.6% of students in Grade 6 were proficient explorers vs. 24.6% in Grade 8; 27.1% of students in Grade 6 were low-performing explorers vs. 25.8% in Grade 8), and there were no substantial gender differences. This study contributes to the understanding of how students interact with complex problems and is the first to address whether variations in these behaviors indicate qualitatively different levels of strategic behavior. We discuss the theoretical underpinnings and potential of identifying class profiles of students' exploration behavior in the field of educational psychology. [less ▲]

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See detailStudents' immigration background as a moderator of predictive validity of tracking decisions.
Klapproth, Florian UL; Schaltz, Paule UL

in Procedia Social and Behavioral Sciences (in press)

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See detailStudents’ perceptions of instructional quality: Validating 3 dimensions on a lesson-to-lesson basis
Talic, Irma UL; Möller, Jens; Niepel, Christoph UL

Scientific Conference (2020, January 17)

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See detailStudents' social origins and targeted grade inflation
Tampieri, Alessandro UL

Scientific Conference (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (7 UL)
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See detailStudents' social origins and targeted grade inflation
Tampieri, Alessandro UL

Scientific Conference (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (4 UL)