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See detailTrade-offs between energy cost and health impact in a regional coupled energy–air quality model: the LEAQ model
Peters, Bernhard UL; Zachary, Dan; Drouet, L. et al

in Environmental Research Letters (2011)

Detailed reference viewed: 64 (5 UL)
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See detailTradeoff Cryptanalysis of Memory-Hard Functions
Biryukov, Alex UL; Khovratovich, Dmitry UL

in 21st International Conference on the Theory and Application of Cryptology and Information Security (2015, December)

We explore time-memory and other tradeoffs for memory-hard functions, which are supposed to impose significant computational and time penalties if less memory is used than intended. We analyze two schemes ... [more ▼]

We explore time-memory and other tradeoffs for memory-hard functions, which are supposed to impose significant computational and time penalties if less memory is used than intended. We analyze two schemes: Catena, which has been presented at Asiacrypt 2014, and Lyra2, the fastest finalist of the Password Hashing Competition (PHC). We demonstrate that Catena's proof of tradeoff resilience is flawed, and attack it with a novel \emph{precomputation tradeoff}. We show that using $M^{2/3}$ memory instead of $M$ we may have no time penalties. We further generalize our method for a wide class of schemes with predictable memory access. For Lyra2, which addresses memory unpredictability (depending on the input), we develop a novel \emph{ranking tradeoff} and show how to decrease the time-memory and the time-area product by significant factors. We also generalize the ranking method for a wide class of schemes with unpredictable memory access [less ▲]

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See detailTradeoffs in networks with positive and negative feedback
Goncalves, Jorge UL; Yi, T.; Doyle, J.

Scientific Conference (2005)

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See detailTrading Goods or Human Capital: The Gains and Losses from Economic Integration
Burzynski, Michal UL

in Scandinavian Journal of Economics (2018), 120(2), 503-536

In this paper, I quantify the economic consequences of liberalizing migration in the OECD and compare them with those of a hypothetical liberalization of trade across the OECD. First, I investigate the ... [more ▼]

In this paper, I quantify the economic consequences of liberalizing migration in the OECD and compare them with those of a hypothetical liberalization of trade across the OECD. First, I investigate the bilateral migration and trade agreements between the EU and Australia, Canada, Japan, Turkey, and the US. Second, I show that the overall impact of reducing all legal restrictions on migration in the OECD is moderate (1.6 percent in real GDP), while the gains from removing tariff and non-tariff barriers to trade among all of the OECD economies are slightly lower (1.1 percent in real GDP). Finally, both the theoretical and numerical findings suggest that the direction of relationships between trade and migration (either substitutability or complementarity) depends on the type of shock imposed in the system. [less ▲]

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See detailTrading Zones of Digital History
Kemman, Max Jonathan UL

Doctoral thesis (2019)

As long as there have been computers, there have been scholars pulling at historians, challenging them to use these computers for historical research. Yet what role computers can have in historical ... [more ▼]

As long as there have been computers, there have been scholars pulling at historians, challenging them to use these computers for historical research. Yet what role computers can have in historical research is a matter of continuous debate. Under the signifier of “digital history”, historians have experimented with tools, concepts, and methods from other disciplines, mostly computer science and computational linguistics, to benefit the historical discipline. The collaborations that emerge through these experiments can be characterised as a two-sided uncertainty: historians uncertain how they as historians should use digital methods, and computational experts uncertain how digital methods should work with historical data sets. The opportunity that arises from these uncertainties is that historians and computational experts need to negotiate the methods and concepts under development. In this thesis, I investigate these negotiations as trading zones, as local spaces of negotiation. These negotiations are characterised as a duality of boundary practices. First, boundary crossing, the crossing of boundaries of disciplines, discourses, and institutions to collaborate. Second, boundary construction, the establishment of boundaries of groups and communities to preserve disciplinary values and remain recognisable as part of a community of practice. How boundary crossing and construction are balanced, whether disciplinary boundaries are shifted, and to what extent historians’ practices are transformed by continued interaction with computational experts, are open questions demanding closer scrutiny. These considerations lead to the research question underlying this thesis: how are historians affected by interactions with computational experts in the context of digital history collaborations? I investigate this question through a mixed-methods, multi-sited ethnographic approach, consisting of an open online survey which received 173 responses, 4.5 years of observations at the University of Luxembourg, 37 interviews, and an LDA topic modelling analysis of 10,918 blog posts from 73 historians between 2008-2017. Through these approaches, I examine trading zones as configured by three different dimensions. First, connectedness, the extent to which collaborators connect with one another through physical proximity, communication, and the sharing of practices. Second, power asymmetry, the extent to which participants shape their own field of action as well as the fields of action of their collaborators. Third, cultural maintenance, the extent to which collaborators become more alike or stay apart by adopting new practices or displacing previous practices. On a macro level, referring to the global historical discipline, I conclude that methodological approaches developed in local trading zones have hardly diffused to macro solutions. Insofar digital infrastructures were appropriated in the macro community, these were aligned with traditional practices. Rather than transforming historical scholarship, the challenge was to provide infrastructures congruent with existing values and practices. On a meso level, referring to the historians engaged in digital history trading zones, I conclude that the effect of interactions was dependent on individual decisions and incentives. Some historians experimented with or adopted computational practices and concepts. Yet other historians detached their work from the shared objective of a collaboration in order to reduce risks, as well as to maintain disciplinary practices. The majority of participants in trading zones were scholars from the humanities, physically distant from collaborators, communicating more often with disciplinary peers than with cross-disciplinary collaborators. As such, even when participating in trading zones of digital history, a significant number of historians remained aligned with traditional practices. Changing practices were regularly not in the direction of computational practices, but to incentives of politics or funding. While historians that participated in digital history trading zones therefore did learn new practices, this did not entail a computational transformation of their scholarship. Finally, on a micro level, some historians chose to engage intensively with computational experts. I call these individuals digital history brokers, who exemplified significant shifts in practices. Brokers conducted project management; coordinated practices from archival and library domains such as data collection, transformation, and description; learned about the potential and limitations of computational technologies and where to apply these; employed inter-languages to translate between the different collaborating domains; and finally transformed historical questions into infrastructural problems. Digital history brokers thereby not only developed interactional expertise to collaborate with computational experts. They furthermore developed political proficiency to negotiate the socio- economic potential of digital history strategies with politics, university administrators, and funding agencies. I therefore describe the practices of brokers as infrastructuring, covering a duality of negotiations. First, cross-disciplinary socio-technical negotiations with computational experts how to support scholarly practices with digital technology. Second, intra-disciplinary socio-political negotiations how to diffuse those practices within the community of practice. Digital history brokers therefore transform their own practices, so that other historians do not have to on meso or macro levels, but can employ digitised sources and digital methodology through infrastructures in a fashion that naturally fits into their practices as historians. I thereby provide a critical view on digital history grounded in how it is conducted and negotiated. This thesis is therefore aimed mainly at scholars interested in digital history and its relation to the historical discipline and to digital humanities, as well as scholars interested in studying digital history as a specific case of cross-disciplinarity. [less ▲]

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See detailTrading Zones of Digital History
Kemman, Max UL

Presentation (2016)

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See detailTradition oder Zukunft? 50 Jahre Deutsche Gesellschaft für Erziehungswissenschaft aus bildungshistorischer Sicht
Tröhler, Daniel UL

in Zeitschrift für Pädagogik (2014), 60(1), 9-31

The author interprets the most recent secessionist movements within the GERA as the manifestation of a fundamental problem that had already been virulent at the time of the associationʼs foundation (1964 ... [more ▼]

The author interprets the most recent secessionist movements within the GERA as the manifestation of a fundamental problem that had already been virulent at the time of the associationʼs foundation (1964) and that had not been utterly new, even then. The primary thesis states that the guiding ideology of the GERA at that time was bound to a concept of future primarily nourished by the idealist tradition. Thus, the association ostracized mainly extramural actors of educational reform who were committed to an expertocratic concept of the future, developed mainly in the United States, and who, in this, relied on specific psychology models. When, after the end of the Cold War, the OECD was able to enforce its vision of school policy and educational reform, this ideology of pedagogical planning, supposedly unimpeded by any traditions, managed to establish itself within the GERA, too. This, however, created a blatant polarity with the traditional concept of education – a field of tension that can only be dissolved constructively through historical-comparative analyses. [less ▲]

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See detailThe tradition of Community Music in Luxembourg
Sagrillo, Damien UL

Scientific Conference (2007, July)

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See detailTraditionelle Geschlechterrollen und der geringere Schulerfolg der Jungen. Quantitative und qualitative Befunde aus einer Schulstudie im Kanton Bern (Schweiz)
Hadjar, Andreas UL; Grünewald-Huber, Elisabeth; Gysin, Stefanie et al

in Schweizerische Zeitschrift für Soziologie = Revue Suisse de Sociologie (2012), 38(3), 375-400

Detailed reference viewed: 152 (4 UL)
See detailTraditionen der Medienwirkungsforschung im Überblick
Jäckel, Michael; Fröhlich, Gerrit; Röder, Daniel et al

in von Gross, Friederike; Meister, Dorothee; Sander, Uwe (Eds.) Die Geschichte der Medienpädagogik in Deutschland (2015)

The article offers an overview of the tradition of media research effects. It summarizes the Persuasion Theories, Active Audience Theories, Social Context Theories, Societal and Media Theories ... [more ▼]

The article offers an overview of the tradition of media research effects. It summarizes the Persuasion Theories, Active Audience Theories, Social Context Theories, Societal and Media Theories, Interpretative Effects Models and New Media Theories. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 106 (8 UL)
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See detailTraditions in Tension: An Ethnographic Inquiry of Luxembourg’s Family-Run Hotels
Adiguna, Rocky UL

Doctoral thesis (2018)

The suggestion that tradition plays a role in family business is a long-acknowledged but often presumed notion in family business research. As a result, studies that attempt to conceptualise tradition as ... [more ▼]

The suggestion that tradition plays a role in family business is a long-acknowledged but often presumed notion in family business research. As a result, studies that attempt to conceptualise tradition as a focal point remain scarce. This dissertation addresses this vacuum by examining the properties and processes that are involved in the tradition-making and tradition-maintaining of hospitality-based family businesses. Based on an ethnographic inquiry of five hotel-running families in Luxembourg, this dissertation inquires into the meanings and tensions of tradition. Drawing from a process perspective, it explores how family owner-managers receive, enact, and perpetuate the continuity of the family businesses as traditions. Theoretically, this study contributes to two streams of literature: to the family business literature by providing a conceptual foundation for understanding tradition as process, and to the process organisation studies literature by proposing family business as an exemplar of tradition where the past is immanent in the present. Methodologically, this study attends to discourses and narratives at the national level, the industry level, and the organisational level to contextualise the family-run hotels in a wider discursive space. These multi-level analyses constitute the basis for the application of a field ethnography which attempts to explore the relationality between different modes of discourse in a chosen field: texts, talks, actions, and images. As a result, the lived narratives of five hotel-running families are produced. This dissertation advances tradition as a root metaphor for family business and proposes three different angles of seeing the family business as tradition: family business as received tradition, family business as enacted tradition, and family business as tradition to be transmitted. In alignment with the process perspective, four dualities in the enactment of the family businesses as traditions are discussed: repetition and novelty, preservation and abandonment, being and appearing, and certainty and possibility. Ultimately, this dissertation puts into question the predominant understanding of tradition as a fixed construct argues instead that tradition's apparent unity, fixity, and stability is a result of a reflexive process which is enacted by owner-managers on a daily basis. [less ▲]

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See detailTraditionsbewusstsein - eine wenig beachtete Grundhaltung
Tröhler, Daniel UL

in Infos und Akzente (1997), (17), 11-14

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See detailLa traduction en acte
Colas-Blaise, Marion UL

in Marillaud, P.; Gauthier, R. (Eds.) L'écrit: de la signification et de l'interprétation à la traduction et aux discours critiques (2011)

Detailed reference viewed: 35 (0 UL)
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See detailTraffic Aware Scheduling Algorithm for Multi-Hop IEEE 802.15.4e Networks
Palattella, Maria Rita UL; Accettura, Nicola; Dohler, Mischa et al

in Proc. of PIMRC2012 (2012)

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See detailTraffic Management and Networking for Autonomous Vehicular Highway Systems
Rubin, Izhak; Baiocchi, Andrea; Sunyoto, Yulia et al

in Ad Hoc Networks (2019), 83

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See detailTraffic Monitoring and Incident Detection Using Cellular and Early Stage VANET Technology Deployment
De Felice, Mario; Cuomo, Francesca; Baiocchi, Andrea et al

in Proceedings of the First International Workshop on Internet of Vehicles and Vehicles of Internet (2016)

In the current Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) traffic monitoring and incident detection are usually supported with mostly traditional and relatively slow reactivity technologies. In this paper ... [more ▼]

In the current Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) traffic monitoring and incident detection are usually supported with mostly traditional and relatively slow reactivity technologies. In this paper we propose a new service, namely THOR (Traffic monitoring Hybrid ORiented service), able to combine two different wireless technologies and to provide real time information about vehicular traffic monitoring and incident detection. THOR relies on LTE (Long Term Evolution) and Dedicated Short Range Communication based VANETs (Vehicular ad-hoc NETworks) in a hybrid approach, which is compliant with ITS standards. This hybrid networking approach can be deployed today and can be ready for tomorrow VANET technology. We test THOR by simulations in a scenario with vehicle flows synthesized from real measured vehicular traffic traces. We provide an LTE load analysis and an assessment of incident detection capabilities. Our results are promising in terms of reactivity, precision and network traffic load sustainability. [less ▲]

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See detailTraffic Routing in Urban Environments: the Impact of Partial Information
Codeca, Lara UL; Frank, Raphaël UL; Engel, Thomas UL

in Proceedings of 17th Internatonal IEEE Conference on Intelligent Transportation Systems (2014, October)

There are many studies concerning the problem of traffic congestion in cities. One of the best accepted solutions to relieving congestion involves optimization of resources already available, by means of ... [more ▼]

There are many studies concerning the problem of traffic congestion in cities. One of the best accepted solutions to relieving congestion involves optimization of resources already available, by means of balancing traffic flows to minimize travel delays. To achieve this optimization, it is necessary to collect and process Floating Car Data (FCD) from vehicles. In this paper we evaluate the repercussions of partial information on the overall traffic view, and consequently on the outcome of the optimization. Our study focuses on the role of the user participation rate and the availability of Road Side Units to collect the FCD. By means of simulation we quantify the impact of partially-available information on the computation of route optimization, and how it impedes traffic flows. Our results show that even minor uncertainties can significantly impact routing strategies and lead to deterioration in the overall traffic situation. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 116 (14 UL)