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See detailSocial inequalities and correlates of alcohol abuse among young adults.
Spitz, E.; Baumann, Michèle UL

in Psychology & Health (2008), 23(suppl. 1), 242

is a public health problem. This study assessed social disparities in alcohol abuse among young adults and whether they were mediated by psychological and social characteristics. Methods: 1,905 people ... [more ▼]

is a public health problem. This study assessed social disparities in alcohol abuse among young adults and whether they were mediated by psychological and social characteristics. Methods: 1,905 people aged 18-34, randomly selected in north-eastern France completed a post-mailed questionnaire. The data were analyzed via logistic models. Findings: Alcohol abuse was common: 18.7%. Compared with upper/intermediate professionals, significant OR adjusted for sex were found for manual workers (159, 95%CI 1.05-2.42) and employees (1.55, 1.02-2.37) but not for other professionals, students, housewives, and unemployed people. Adjusting for all confounders did not reduce the OR for manual workers (1.48) and employees (1.56). The significant confounders were: sex, living alone, poor health, hearing/cognitive disabilities, being not-sociable, aggressive, and low income (1.28≤OR≤4.25). Discussion: There are social disparities in alcohol abuse among young adults, but they are slightly mediated by individual confounders. [less ▲]

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See detailSocial inequalities in dementia care, cure, and research
Leist, Anja UL

in Journal of the American Geriatrics Society (2017)

Social inequalities in dementia can be found in diagnosis, cure, care, and research. Less advantaged groups are women, persons with ethnic minority status, lower income, lower education, and living in ... [more ▼]

Social inequalities in dementia can be found in diagnosis, cure, care, and research. Less advantaged groups are women, persons with ethnic minority status, lower income, lower education, and living in more deprived or rural areas. These social inequalities suggest that funding of research and medical and care expenses related to dementia may not be equitably allocated to those in need, even in the most advanced countries. Experience from the field of heart disease gives an estimate on the timescale and efforts it takes to successfully address social inequalities related to gender. Strong concerted efforts will be needed to mitigate social inequalities in dementia. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 295 (12 UL)
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See detailSocial inequalities of health and handicap. The example of the cerebral vascular attack
Aïach, P.; Baumann, Michèle UL

in Scientific, Committee (Ed.) European Society for Health and Medical Sociology (2006)

The social inequalities of health are observed in the field of illness and death. What about the inequalities with a handicap?. The studies and surveys that highlight the relationship between handicap and ... [more ▼]

The social inequalities of health are observed in the field of illness and death. What about the inequalities with a handicap?. The studies and surveys that highlight the relationship between handicap and social health inequalities are cruelly lacking. It is for this reason that we tried to explore this relationship in the scope of a survey carried out in France on the social and family repercussions of a cerebral vascular attack. The method used, a significant national survey in France (1000 people questioned in 260 families where a stroke took place in the previous year), carried out in 2004/2005 taking into account the family repercussion of a cerebral vascular attack, we tried to highlight the differences and the social inequalities that exist as much in the frequency and the gravity of deficiencies due to a stroke, as in the effects produced on the family life, in particular to the spouse. This survey, conducted in the home, is made up of three questionnaires, one of which is the main one( particularly the spouse’s) takes into account all the aspects of family life and the social relationships whilst trying to highlight the repercussions following the stroke. The results. The results show the extent of the impact on the family, especially in the relationship of the couple. On the whole, they confirm the assumption of social inequalities between social groups defined according to the income, the educational level and the profession, in particular with regards to the gravity of deficiencies, progress of rehabilitation, the quality of the financial responsibility, the standard of living and in several dimensions of social life (leisure and cultural activities). However it is necessary to underline the difficulty in isolating the social inequalities which are expressed apart from the situation due to the stroke; inequalities which can be enhanced or which take on a particular character because of this accident. Conclusion We can hold on to the hypothesis that the stroke represents an event that can be considered as an indicator of the previous social state and relationship, bringing on in some way aggravating effects that can be as positive as they can be negative. Social health inequalities must be analyses whilst taking this hypothesis into account. [less ▲]

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See detailSocial Inequality and the transition to retirement in Europe and the US
Ponomarenko, Valentina UL

Poster (2013, November 28)

This study examines the transition to retirement in a comparative analysis. The intersection to retirement has been linked with diverse consequences in past research. On one side, studies find negative ... [more ▼]

This study examines the transition to retirement in a comparative analysis. The intersection to retirement has been linked with diverse consequences in past research. On one side, studies find negative effects on psychological well-being of retirement due to loss of employment, social networks and stability through work life. Others present results of a positive effect connected to pension. From a life course perspective, experiences in one’s employment history might impact the transition to and the retirement period itself. I hypothesize on the individual level that transition to retirement is influenced by working life experience and quality. The transition to retirement might be easier for people with a higher socio-economic status thus high education as well as financial resources. On the other hand, the experience of unemployment or lower job placement might cause depression or a decline of life satisfaction. The Theory of Cumulative Advantages and the mechanism of scarring propose that unemployment will have a long-life effect on the career. But is the effect even sustaining in old age? How does the transition to retirement influence life satisfaction and what impact has scarring? To answer these questions I will make use of SHARE and HRS longitudinal data on well-being of seniors and their socioeconomic situation and work history. The rich variation of countries in SHARE makes it possible to compare different welfare regimes. As SHARE lacks liberal countries, I will include the US to have a more consistent picture. [less ▲]

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See detailSocial Innovation and Participatory Action Research: A way to research community?
Taylor Aiken, Gerald UL

in European Public & Social Innovation Review (2017), 2(1),

Civil society actors gathered in so-called ‘community’ initiatives generate a particular impetus for low carbon transitions. This paper seeks to outline a methodological approach that can be used in order ... [more ▼]

Civil society actors gathered in so-called ‘community’ initiatives generate a particular impetus for low carbon transitions. This paper seeks to outline a methodological approach that can be used in order to help understand such movements, and more fundamentally, the role of community in Social Innovation (SI). The article offers an overview of Participative Action Research (PAR), and outlines its strengths and weaknesses in studying community-based social innovation, in this case the Transition movement. PAR is not an ‘off the shelf’ kit, or a ‘conforming of methodological standards’, but rather a series of approaches that ought to inform research. The paper argues that these approaches, rather than techniques, are essential to get right if the intangible, granular, and incidental-but-fundamental aspects of community are to be grasped by researchers. Given the small-scale nature of community low carbon transitions a granular analysis is preferred to a more surface, superficial overview of such processes. Qualitative research is preferred to quantitative aggregation of initiatives, due to the need to understand the everyday, more phenomenological aspects of community, and the specific tacit relations and subjectivities enacted through their capacity to cut carbon. Despite challenges with using PAR for SI, the Transition Research Network offers an active guide to achieving this. [less ▲]

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See detailSocial Interaction Based Audience Segregation for Online Social Networks.
van der Torre, Leon UL; Ahmed, Javed; Governatori, Guido et al

in Proceedings of the European Conference on Social Intelligence (2014)

Online social networking is the latest craze that has captured the attention of masses, people use these sites to communicate with their friends and family. These sites o er attractive means of social ... [more ▼]

Online social networking is the latest craze that has captured the attention of masses, people use these sites to communicate with their friends and family. These sites o er attractive means of social interac- tions and communications, but also raise privacy concerns. This paper examines user's abilities to control access to their personal information posted in online social networks. Online social networks lack common mechanism used by individuals in their real life to manage their privacy. The lack of such mechanism signi cantly a ects the level of user control over their self presentation in online social networks. In this paper, we present social interaction based audience segregation model for online so- cial networks. This model mimics real life interaction patterns and makes online social networks more privacy friendly. Our model uses type, fre- quency, and initiation factor of social interactions to calculate friendship strength. The main contribution of the model is that it considers set of all possible interactions among friends and assigns a numerical weight to each type of interaction in order to increase or decrease its contribu- tion in calculation of friendship strength based on its importance in the development of relationship ties. [less ▲]

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See detailSocial interactions, social capital and urban structure
Picard, Pierre M. UL

Presentation (2013, July)

Detailed reference viewed: 45 (2 UL)
See detailSocial interactions, social capital and urban structure
Picard, Pierre M. UL

Presentation (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (2 UL)
See detailSocial media analysis
Schafer, Valerie UL; Clavert, Frédéric UL; Grandjean, Martin

Presentation (2018, September 12)

Digital social media have become so pervasive that historians can no longer ignore them, not only as a means of communication but also as a potential source for their research. This training session will ... [more ▼]

Digital social media have become so pervasive that historians can no longer ignore them, not only as a means of communication but also as a potential source for their research. This training session will be divided into three parts: feedback on previous research projects and experiences, a "hands-on" session in which participants can make their first Twitter data collection and analysis, and finally a critical perspective on digital social media as a source in humanities and social sciences. [less ▲]

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See detailSocial Media and Its Role in Friendship-driven Interactions among Young People A Mixed Methods Study
Decieux, Jean Philippe Pierre UL; Heinen, Andreas UL; Willems, Helmut UL

in Young : Nordic Journal of Youth Research (2018), Online First

This article examines trends and developments in social interactions of young people and the role of social media in Luxembourg using a mixed method approach, drawing on both quantitative and qualitative ... [more ▼]

This article examines trends and developments in social interactions of young people and the role of social media in Luxembourg using a mixed method approach, drawing on both quantitative and qualitative data. Our findings corroborate that social interactions via social media play a growing role in leisure time of young people and have changed the traditional patterns of friendship-driven social interactions among peers. We argue that although offline interactions remain very important for young people, they have been complemented and partially replaced by interactions via social media. Modes of young people’s social media interactions can be characterized as mixed modalities. [less ▲]

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See detailSocial Media as an Opportunity for Public Health Interventions: The #Metoo Movement as an Exemplar
Gomez Bravo, Raquel UL; Gomez Bravo, María; Lygidakis, Charilaos UL et al

in Journal of the International Society for Telemedicine and EHealth (2019), 7(e5), 1-7

Background: Social media have been used exponentially and globally, providing a means for billions of users to connect, interact, share opinions and criticise, becoming one of the main channels of ... [more ▼]

Background: Social media have been used exponentially and globally, providing a means for billions of users to connect, interact, share opinions and criticise, becoming one of the main channels of communication for users around the world. One of the most popular free social media networks is Twitter, with more than 100 million active users per day worldwide. Purpose: The aim of this study was to analyse a sample of the public conversations generated, using the hashtag #MeToo, around the topic of sexual abuse on Twitter. Methods: Using social media marketing software, the use of the #MeToo hashtag was analysed over a period of 60 days (14 September 2017 to 13 November of 2017). Results: The #MeToo conversation was mainly in English (79.3%), located in the United States (48.2% of cases), but with global repercussions. The volume of mentions of the #MeToo hashtag was far greater (97.7%), compared with other hashtags related to violence over this period of time, using mostly Twitter (96.2%). Conclusions: These results suggest that it is possible to describe different groups using the social media, and analyse their conversations to identify opportunities for successful public health interventions. If the topic is relevant for the general public, it will generate interest and conversations at the global level, supported by a universal and borderless channel such as Twitter. [less ▲]

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See detailSocial media use in old age: User profiles, effects, best practices
Leist, Anja UL; Aleksic, Gabrijela UL; Ferring, Dieter UL

in Gerontologist (2012), 52(S1), 563-564

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See detailSocial media use of older adults: a mini-review
Leist, Anja UL

in Gerontology (2013), 59(4), 378-84

Background. Maintaining social relationships has been defined as a core element of aging well. With a considerable amount of older adults living alone, social media provides the possibility to engage in ... [more ▼]

Background. Maintaining social relationships has been defined as a core element of aging well. With a considerable amount of older adults living alone, social media provides the possibility to engage in meaningful social contact, e. g., by joining online social networks and online discussion forums. Objective. The review encompasses current knowledge of prerequisites in social media use of older adults such as functional capacity, ICT-related knowledge, and favorable attitudes towards social media. Then, potential of social media use for clinical practice and possible negative consequences are outlined. Method. Literature on social media use from a gerontological perspective was reviewed in July and August 2012. Results. Online communities are suitable to provide and receive social support when confronted with a difficult life situation, regardless of geographical location or time. From a practitioners’ perspective, social media can be used to advance health-related knowledge such as information on prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of specific conditions and disorders. Further positive consequences have been shown to be overcoming loneliness, relieving stress, and raising feelings of control and self-efficacy. Possible negative consequences could be misuse of personal data as well as the distribution and uncritical adoption of potentially harmful information via online communities. Discussion. The potential of social media in clinical practice is reflected in a wide range of intervention possibilities for older adults. However, with the rise of social media new threats emerge for older adults as well. [less ▲]

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See detailSocial mix and housing policy: local effects of a misleading rhetoric. The case of Milan
Bricocoli, Massimo UL; Cucca, Roberta

in Urban Studies (2014)

The article focuses on different uses of the concept of social mix and on emerging criticalities of its use as a planning principle by discussing the results of empirical research on recent housing ... [more ▼]

The article focuses on different uses of the concept of social mix and on emerging criticalities of its use as a planning principle by discussing the results of empirical research on recent housing projects in Milan, Italy. Although the concept of social mix is generally represented as a tool to improve the living conditions of disadvantaged social groups, the praise for social mix in new housing projects may also be driven by the will of targeting the needs of specific medium–low income groups considered functional to urban growth, and by the increase of real estate values that it may provide. In urban contexts affected by a severe shortage of rental housing, social mix strategies may foster the exclusion of lowest-income groups from access to social housing and favour their segregation. Especially with reference to southern European cities, social mix risks becoming a catchword with paradoxical effects in local policy agendas and the topic of mixed communities becoming employed as a socio-political lever for developer-led, profit-making developments. [less ▲]

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See detailSocial Network Analysis for Judgment Aggregation
Colombo Tosatto, Silvano UL; Van Zee, Marc UL

in Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multiagent Systems (2014)

The majority of work in judgment aggregation is devoted to the study of impossibility results. However the (social) dependencies that may exist between the voters has received less attention. In this ... [more ▼]

The majority of work in judgment aggregation is devoted to the study of impossibility results. However the (social) dependencies that may exist between the voters has received less attention. In this extended abstract we use the degree centrality measure from social network analysis and obtain a correspondence between the average voter rule and this measure, and show that approach can lead to more resolute outcomes in the voting process. [less ▲]

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See detailSocial network analysis over dynamic graphs and application to urban mobile ad hoc networks
Herbiet, Guillaume-Jean UL

Doctoral thesis (2012)

Wireless mobile ad hoc networks (MANET) are composed of mobile communicating devices that self-organize to ubiquitously exchange information over the air. Envisioned applications for such networks cover ... [more ▼]

Wireless mobile ad hoc networks (MANET) are composed of mobile communicating devices that self-organize to ubiquitously exchange information over the air. Envisioned applications for such networks cover disaster relief situations, battlefield deployment and more generally any use-case that makes the deployment of wired or infrastructure-based networks too costly or simply unsuitable. Lately, new applications for MANETs are developing in the urban environment, namely mobile social networks and vehicular ad hoc networks. Despite this large spectrum of possible applications and the large number of wireless-capable devices available today, mobile ad hoc networks remain confidential. One important reason is the lack of reliability of wireless communications, especially on long path. In this thesis, we propose to cope with this problem by creating virtual structures that will group together limited set of users that are densely and reliably connected in order to favor the dynamic and robust exchange of information. Our proposal uses the concept of community, that first appeared in social network analysis. After reviewing the main concepts taken from this branch of graph theory and justifying the application by underlining the specificities of MANETs in the urban context, we formally present our contribution, based on epidemic propagation of community labels. Then we exhibit its applications on concrete communication systems and how it can benefit more generally to improve the management of wireless ad hoc networks topology. [less ▲]

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See detailSocial network semantics for agent communication
Boella, Guido UL; Hulstijn, Joris UL; van der Torre, Leon UL

in Social network semantics for agent communication (2009)

In this paper we introduce a semantics for agent communication languages based on social networks, providing us with a principled way to define and reason about their dynamics. As an instance we consider ... [more ▼]

In this paper we introduce a semantics for agent communication languages based on social networks, providing us with a principled way to define and reason about their dynamics. As an instance we consider dependence networks, where the social relations represent that an agent depends on another agent to achieve its intentions. We suggest how FIPA semantics can be reconstructed in this social semantics. Our approach reveals that we need special semantics for relations like ownership, authority or fear: all kinds of interesting social relations, not previously studied by multiagent systems. [less ▲]

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See detailSocial participation and peer relationships of students with special educational needs
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL

Scientific Conference (2018, September 06)

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See detailSocial participation of students with special educational needs in regular classes
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Krischler, Mireille UL

Scientific Conference (2017, August 23)

Theoretical background: Although more than twenty years have passed since the Salamanca statement (UNESCO, 1994), research still shows that children with special educational needs (SEN) are often socially ... [more ▼]

Theoretical background: Although more than twenty years have passed since the Salamanca statement (UNESCO, 1994), research still shows that children with special educational needs (SEN) are often socially excluded by peers (Garrote & Dessemontet, 2015) and have fewer friends than their typically developing peers (e.g. Eriksson, Welander, & Granlund, 2007). Following UN conventions (UN, 2006; UNESCO, 2000) there is a drive to a more inclusive society and hence inclusive education is on the political agenda of many countries. Inclusive education not only aims to reduce educational inequalities but also promotes social participation as being accepted and appreciated by typically developing peers facilitates the development of social relations and creates opportunities for participating in peer groups (Hartup, 1996). However, social participation not only depends on the opportunity of social interaction with peers but is also affected by social competence and peer acceptance (e.g. Schwab, Gebhardt, & Gasteiger-Klicpera, 2013). To this extent, children with SEN seem to have poorer social skills than their peers and experience more problems in creating and maintaining social relations (Carlson, 1987). Students with SEN are also more vulnerable of being bullied by their typically developing peers (Rose, Monda-Amaya, & Espelage, 2011). Studies comparing the social participation of groups of students having different types of SEN suggest that the risk of being less well accepted by peers is higher for students with behavioural problems than for students with learning difficulties (Avramidis, 2010; Bossaert, Colpin, Pijl, & Petry, 2013a). Social participation includes the extent of social interactions, peer acceptance, friendships as well as social self-concept (Bossaert et al., 2013a; 2013b). As merely including these students in regular classes alone cannot guarantee social participation, the question arises to what extent different person variables contribute to social inclusion or rejection. To this extent Bossaert et al (2013a) reported that not all students with SEN experience difficulties, and that especially boys with social-emotional difficulties (i.e. autistic spectrum disorders) and girls with motor and sensory difficulties were at risk. Similarly, Schwab et al (2013) concluded that social participation was associated with specific behavioural difficulties of some students with SEN. Students with learning difficulties may also be at risk as research generally has found that these students often have problems with social skills (Wight & Chapparo, 2008), which may affect their friendships and social participation. The current study therefore first aimed to investigate the social participation of primary school students with SEN (i.e bahvioural problems or learning difficulties) attending regular schools. Second, we investigated to what extent social participation was related to academic performance, behavioural problems, and prosocial behaviour. Method: Preservice teachers completed measures of social participation, behavior and academic performance for a total of 50 primary students. Students attended different primary school classes and were described as having learning difficulties, behavioural difficulties, or both. More specifically, preservice teachers completed the Perceptions of Inclusion Questionnaire (Venetz, et al., 2015), the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (Goodman, 1997) and estimated the students´ academic performance in German, French and Mathematics. The PIQ is a brief measure to assess the emotional, social and competence-based relatedness of students aged 8-16 years. The 12 items comprise 3 scales: social inclusion, emotional inclusion and academic self-concept. Each item is rated on a 4-point scale from 1 (not at all true) to 4 (certainly true). The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire consists of 25 statements of behavior. For each statement the degree to which this behavior is typical of their child Is rated on a 3-point scale (0 = not true, 1 = somewhat true, 2 = certainly true). The scale contains four behaviour difficulty subscales (conduct problems; hyperactivity; peer problems; and emotional symptoms) and one strength category (prosocial behavior). A total behaviour score is calculated by adding the scores of the four problem domains. Academic performance was assessed by estimates of students´ academic performance in German, French and Mathematics. Preliminary Results: Frequency distributions indicate that although the social participation of students with learning difficulties and behavioural problems, nearly one third experiences problems. In addition preservice teachers reported behavioural difficulties for a large proportion of their students (34-42%). Furthermore, for 46% of the students, prosocial behavior was rated low (i.e. scores less than 5). No differences in social inclusion were found for students with behavioural or learning difficulties. However, students with behavioural problems had significantly higher SDQ scores (i.e. more behavioural problems) than students with learning difficulties Social inclusion was negatively correlated with peer problems and conduct problems, that is students with more peer or conduct problems are less socially integrated. In contrast, a positive correlation between prosocial behavior and social inclusion indicated that students displaying kindness and support towards others are more successful in participating in their social group. No relationships were found between academic performance and social participation. Conclusion: Students with SEN may have difficulties to be fully accepted in social groups, even when educated in inclusive schools, whereby especially students with conduct and peer problems may be vulnerable. Prosocial behavior however may facilitate social participation. [less ▲]

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See detailSocial policy measures for improving subjective well-being in later life: Issues of theoretical and empirical foundation
Boll, Thomas UL; Ferring, Dieter UL

Scientific Conference (2014, September 15)

Subjective well-being (SWB) in later life is important not just as an indicator of life quality, of mental health and of successful aging of older people, but also because of its effects on individually ... [more ▼]

Subjective well-being (SWB) in later life is important not just as an indicator of life quality, of mental health and of successful aging of older people, but also because of its effects on individually or socially relevant outcomes (e.g. health, social engagement). This raises the question about the extent to which and under what conditions SWB of older people can be improved by social policy measures (SPM). Our presentation examines theoretical and empirical issues related to answering this question. A first theoretical topic considers the relevance of bottom-up vs. top-down approaches conceptualizing the link between domain-specific satisfaction (e.g., with health, financial situation, social relationships) and global life satisfaction in old age. A second issue concerns the theoretical status of SWB in causal networks, i.e., SWB as consequence, as cause, as mediator and as moderator variable. A third topic refers to what can be derived from different theoretical approaches to SWB about whether and when SPM should have an effect of SWB in later life. Following that several empirical questions with respect to improving SWB of older people through SPM are considered. First, we discuss whether the present level of SWB in older adults (or subgroups thereof) indicates a demand for improving SWB. Second, we look at the importance of SWB for individually and socially desirable outcomes (e.g., on health, community involvement) by providing specific evidence which can provide further reasons for improving SWB through SPM. Third, we examine which life circumstances (e.g., financial situation, functional status), life events (e.g., becoming disabled) and individual activities (e.g., volunteering) are known to be significantly related to SWB and which of these conditions could principally be improved through SPM. Fourth, we discuss existing and needed empirical evidence for the effects of local, regional, national SPM on SWB in later life. We emphasize that past research has already produced an impressive body of knowledge relevant for improving SWB in older people through SPM, but that further theoretical and empirical efforts are needed to provide such SPM with a richer foundation. We conclude that better strategies for communicating results of research about SWB to policy makers should be elaborated so that these can have more impact on policy decisions about SPM. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 79 (22 UL)