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See detailSNR Estimation for Multi-dimensional Cognitive Receiver under Correlated Channel/Noise
Sharma, Shree Krishna UL; Chatzinotas, Symeon UL; Ottersten, Björn UL

in IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications (2013), 12(12), 6392-6405

In addition to Spectrum Sensing (SS) capability required by a Cognitive Radio (CR), Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) estimation of the primary signals at the CR receiver is crucial in order to adapt its ... [more ▼]

In addition to Spectrum Sensing (SS) capability required by a Cognitive Radio (CR), Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) estimation of the primary signals at the CR receiver is crucial in order to adapt its coverage area dynamically using underlay techniques. In practical scenarios, channel and noise may be correlated due to various reasons and SNR estimation techniques with the assumption of white noise and uncorrelated channel may not be suitable for estimating the primary SNR. In this paper, firstly, we study the performance of different eigenvaluebased SS techniques in the presence of channel or/and noise correlation. Secondly, we carry out detailed theoretical analysis of the signal plus noise hypothesis to derive the asymptotic eigenvalue probability distribution function (a.e.p.d.f.) of the received signal’s covariance matrix under the following two cases: (i) correlated channel and white noise, and (ii) correlated channel and correlated noise, which is the main contribution of this paper. Finally, an SNR estimation technique based on the derived a.e.p.d.f is proposed in the presence of channel/noise correlation and its performance is evaluated in terms of normalized Mean Square Error (MSE). It is shown that the PU SNR can be reliably estimated when the CR sensing module is aware of the channel/noise correlation. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 274 (25 UL)
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See detailSNURF-SNRPN and UBE3A transcript levels in patients with Angelman syndrome
Runte, Maren UL; Kroisel, PM; Gillessen-Kaesbach, G et al

in Human Genetics (2004), 114(6), 553-561

Detailed reference viewed: 71 (0 UL)
See detail»So mögen sich Leoparden und Wölfe angehört haben...« Erhabenheit und Institution in Kleists Cäcilien-Erzählung
Mein, Georg UL

in Heimböckel, Dieter (Ed.) Kleist und die Moderne (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 54 (4 UL)
See detail"So vielfältig können BD sein!" - Das Projekt "Francomics"
Morys, Nancy UL

in Praxis Fremdsprachenunterricht Französisch (2014), (3), 7-12

Detailed reference viewed: 68 (1 UL)
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See detailSOABench: Performance Evaluation of Service-Oriented Middleware Made Easy
Bianculli, Domenico UL; Binder, Walter; Drago, Mauro Luigi

in Proceedings (Volume 2) of the 32nd International Conference on Software Engineering (ICSE 2010) (2010)

Detailed reference viewed: 32 (2 UL)
See detail#Soapboxscience – Hochbegabung kommunizieren.
Baudson, Tanja Gabriele UL

E-print/Working paper (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (0 UL)
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See detail“Sobbing, Whining, Rumbling” – Listening to Automobiles as Social Practice
Krebs, Stefan UL

in Pinch, Trevor; Bijsterveld, Karin (Eds.) The Oxford Handbook of Sound Studies (2012)

Who listened to cars in the 1920s? Who listened to the sound of its technical malfunctions in the 1950s? Who were the experts to diagnose failures by their ‘golden ears’ (Perlman 2004)? What role did ... [more ▼]

Who listened to cars in the 1920s? Who listened to the sound of its technical malfunctions in the 1950s? Who were the experts to diagnose failures by their ‘golden ears’ (Perlman 2004)? What role did listening play in early automobility? To answer these questions, my paper will analyze how different actor groups in Germany listened to automobiles between the end of World War I and roughly 1960. Further, I’ll focus on car technology’s middle ground – the space between production and consumption (Borg 2007: 1–12). In other words, I’ll closely examine the difficult relations between car users and auto mechanics. While in the 1920s car manufacturers started advertising the silent run of their engines, gears and suspensions, listening to the sound of their automobiles still played an essential role for car users to notice any technical malfunctions. The verbalization of the sound experience was a legitimate and crucial means for error detection. Motorists wrote, for example, to the magazine of the German automobile club, ‘Allgemeine Automobil-Zeitung’, and tried to express their audio evidence with a wide range of metaphors or by relating it to other common sound experiences: their cars were ‘sobbing, whining or rumbling’. Still in the 1930s these descriptions were regularly printed in a column called the ‘letter box’ and experts gave technical advices on their basis. Two decades later things had changed: While listening was still a central means for detecting faults, it was reserved to the ‘trained ears’ of car mechanics only. Instead the professionals made a mock of drivers who listened to their cars: the trade journal ‘Krafthand’ told the story of a car owner who claimed that his car was making a strange splashing noise. But during the inspection the mechanics couldn’t find any faults. Later it was discovered that the sound was merely the echo of avenue trees, which irritated the driver while going past. The moral of articles like this one was, that the ears of ordinary motorists lacked the necessary training to listen to their automobiles. The paper will argue that the observed change of the notion of listening to cars can be explained by using Pierre Bourdieu’s ‘praxeology’: e.g., by conceptualising the here roughly sketched conversion as a symbolic struggle between motorists and auto mechanics about who is the real car sound expert. Then, the stories in the trade journal can be read as descriptions of the auto mechanics habitus, or more precisely: their bodily hexis (Bourdieu 1987: 739). The ability to diagnose malfunctions by listening to the sound of broken-down automobiles became part of the incorporated bodily knowledge of car mechanics. The struggle can thus be interpreted as a negotiation of status: the claim for the exclusive right to listen is then part of the sociotechnical distinction between lay motorists and expert car mechanics. The recurring descriptions of the motorists’ ‘bad ears’ are part of a discursive construction of normal motorists as lay users. Narrations like these are told to exclude motorists from the expert discourse. However motorists always heard their cars while driving, and they still had to listen whether their cars were running well. That is, on a practical level, mechanics couldn’t prevent users from listening, only on a symbolic level they denied access to the realm of car sound as means for technical diagnosis. Due to this contradictory status of listening as an indispensable means to detect malfunctions and listening as an expert tool for detailed diagnosis, users contested the expert authority of auto mechanics. For analyzing the role of listening in automobility I’ll investigate trade journals for auto mechanics, special interest journals for motorists, car manuals and technical handbooks. I’ll take into account editorials, articles and requests for reader’s experiences, advertisements and cartoons. As methodological means I’ll use thick description, and embed the struggle between motorists and mechanics into the historical context of early German automobility, e.g., the change in car functions and properties. For analyzing the empirical findings I’ll refer to the vocabulary of the theory of social practices. [less ▲]

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See detailSobre avós, netos e cidades: entrelaçando relações intergeracionais e experiências urbanas na infância
Ramos, Anne Carolina UL

in Educação e Sociedade (2014), 35(128), 629-982

Detailed reference viewed: 62 (1 UL)
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See detailSociability-Driven User Recruitment in Mobile Crowdsensing Internet of Things Platforms
Fiandrino, Claudio UL; Kantarci, Burak; Anjomshoa, Fazel et al

in IEEE Global Communications Conference (GLOBECOM), Washington, DC, USA, 2016 (2016, December)

The Internet of Things (IoT) paradigm makes the Internet more pervasive, interconnecting objects of everyday life, and is a promising solution for the development of next- generation services. Smart ... [more ▼]

The Internet of Things (IoT) paradigm makes the Internet more pervasive, interconnecting objects of everyday life, and is a promising solution for the development of next- generation services. Smart cities exploit the most advanced information technologies to improve and add value to existing public services. Applying the IoT paradigm to smart cities is fundamental to build sustainable Information and Communication Technology (ICT) platforms. Having citizens involved in the process through mobile crowdsensing (MCS) techniques unleashes potential benefits as MCS augments the capabilities of the platform without additional costs. Recruitment of participants is a key challenge when MCS systems assign sensing tasks to the users. Proper recruitment both minimizes the cost and maximizes the return, such as the number and the accuracy of accomplished tasks. In this paper, we propose a novel user recruitment policy for data acquisition in mobile crowdsensing systems. The policy can be employed in two modes, namely sociability-driven mode and distance-based mode. Sociability stands for the willingness of users in contributing to sensing tasks. Furthermore, we propose a novel metric to assess the efficiency of any recruitment policy in terms of the number of users contacted and the ones actually recruited. Performance evaluation, conducted in a real urban environment for a large number of participants, reveals the effectiveness of sociability-driven user recruitment as the average number of recruited users improves by at least a factor of two. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 296 (21 UL)
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See detailSocial acceptance and peer relationships of children with physical disabilities
Pit-Ten Cate, Ineke UL; Stevenson, Jim

Scientific Conference (2017, August 24)

Following the UN Convention on the rights of people with disabilities a drive towards inclusive education can be observed. Inclusive education not only aims to reduce educational inequalities but also ... [more ▼]

Following the UN Convention on the rights of people with disabilities a drive towards inclusive education can be observed. Inclusive education not only aims to reduce educational inequalities but also promotes social participation. Although social participation partly depends on the opportunity of social interaction with peers (Kirpalani et al., 2000), other factors such as social competence and peer acceptance are important too (e.g. Schwab et al., 2013). Children with special needs are often found to be socially excluded by peers (Garrote & Dessemontet, 2015) and have fewer friends than their typically developing peers (e.g. Eriksson et al., 2007). Research has also indicated that the incidence of social maladjustment problems in children with disabilities is at least twice of that for typically developing children (Goodman & Graham, 1996; Wallander et al., 1989). Hence children with disabilities may be particularly vulnerable in regards to their peer relationships and social participation. Method: Data were collected for a clinical sample of 87 children (aged 6-18 years) with disabilities (i.e. hydrocephalus with or without spina bifida) and 57 typical developing children. Children or parents completed measures on social acceptance (the Self-Perception Profile, Harter, 1985; Harter & Pike, 1984), peer problems and prosocial behaviour (SDQ; Goodman, 1997, 1999), friendship (Berndt et al., 1986) and perceived quality of life (Graham, Stevenson, & Flynn, 1997). Results: Parent and child ratings of social acceptance and peer problems indicated children with disabilities felt less accepted and experienced more peer problems than typically developing children. No differences in prosocial behaviour were found. Although parents of children with disabilities rated the quality of life regarding friendships lower than parents of typically developing children, no differences in child ratings were found. Children with disabilities rated their friendships as less positive compared to typically developing children. Variance in the perceived quality of life could be explained by peer problems and friendship ratings but not social acceptance or peer problems. Conclusion: Friendship and peer relationships emerged as an area of specific difficulty for children with disabilities. These problems were reflected in reports of lower social acceptance, more peer problems and less positive friendship ratings. Child rated quality of life in the domain of friendship was predicted by peer problems and quality of friendship but not social acceptance. Although parents and children were generally in agreement, this study demonstrates the importance of collecting data from different sources, including the children with disabilities themselves. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 275 (3 UL)
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See detailSocial and behavioral factors in cognitive aging: Applying the causal inference framework in observational studies
Leist, Anja UL

Scientific Conference (2019, May 25)

Rationale: There is an urgent need to better understand how to maintain cognitive functioning at older ages with lifestyle interventions, given that there is currently no medical cure available to prevent ... [more ▼]

Rationale: There is an urgent need to better understand how to maintain cognitive functioning at older ages with lifestyle interventions, given that there is currently no medical cure available to prevent, halt or reverse the progression of cognitive decline and dementia. However, in current models, it is still not well established which social and behavioral modifiable factors (e.g. education, BMI, physical activity, sleep, depression) matter most at which ages, and which behavioral profiles are most protective against cognitive decline. In the last years, advances in the fields of causal inference have equipped epidemiology and social sciences with methods and models to approach causal questions in observational studies. Method: The presentation will give an overview of the causal inference framework to investigate the value of behavior changes in cognitive aging. Motivated by conflicting recent publications if physical activity should or should not be recommended to reduce individual risk of cognitive decline, we emulate a target trial where sedentary people are followed over the course of the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) and compare their cognitive development depending on initiating or not physical activity at a later measurement. Extended inclusion/exclusion criteria, and concepts of incident versus prevalent users and multiple eligibility are introduced. Discussion: The causal inference framework applied to observational studies is able to guide study design to reconcile conflicting evidence from intervention and observational studies. Investigations under the new framework have fewer ethical considerations compared to intervention research and, considering the need to follow up individuals over several decades, are considerably more cost-effective. Limitations are discussed. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 177 (32 UL)
See detailSocial and Economic Inclusion
Limbach-Reich, Arthur UL; Nonthasoot, Seree

Scientific Conference (2016, November 09)

Detailed reference viewed: 82 (1 UL)
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See detailSocial and economic inequalities in fatal opioid and cocaine related overdoses in Luxembourg: A case–control study
Origer, Alain UL; Le Bihan, Etienne UL; Baumann, Michèle UL

in International Journal of Drug Policy (2014), 25

Background: To investigate social and economic inequalities in fatal overdose cases related to opioid and cocaine use, recorded in Luxembourg between 1994 and 2011. Methods: Cross-examination of national ... [more ▼]

Background: To investigate social and economic inequalities in fatal overdose cases related to opioid and cocaine use, recorded in Luxembourg between 1994 and 2011. Methods: Cross-examination of national data from law enforcement and drug use surveillance sources and of forensic evidence in a nested case–control study design. Overdose cases were individually matched with four controls, when available, according to sex, year of birth, drug administration route and duration of drug use. 272 cases vs 1056 controls were analysed. Conditional logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the respective impact of a series of socioeconomic variables. Results: Being professionally active [OR = 0.66 (95% CI 0.45–0.99)], reporting salary as main legal income source [OR = 0.42 (95% CI 0.26–0.67)] and education attainment higher than primary school [OR = 0.50 (95% CI 0.34–0.73)] revealed to be protective factors, whereas the professional status of the father or legal guardian of victims was not significantly associated to fatal overdoses. Conclusions: Socioeconomic inequalities in drug users impact on the occurrence of fatal overdoses. Compared to their peers, users of illicit drugs with lower socioeconomic profiles show increased odds of dying from overdose. However, actual and self-referred socioeconomic characteristics of drug users, such as educational attainment and employment, may have a greater predictive value of overdose mortality than the parental socioeconomic status. Education, vocational training and socio-professional reintegration should be part of drug-related mortality prevention policies. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 451 (135 UL)
See detailSocial and Educational Sciences and the Problem of Change
Popkewitz, Thomas S. UL

Presentation (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (0 UL)