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See detailProblem solving in PIAAC. Fundamentals and vision.
Greiff, Samuel UL

Speeches/Talks (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 12 (2 UL)
See detailProblem solving: current state of the art and what there is to come.
Greiff, Samuel UL; Wüstenberg, Sascha UL

Scientific Conference (2013, April 15)

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See detailThe problem with ‘learning’.
Biesta, Gert UL

in Adults Learning (2007), 18(8), 8-11

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See detailProblematic cybersex: Conceptualization, assessment, and treatment.
Wery, A.; Billieux, Joël UL

in Addictive Behaviors (2017), 64

Problematic involvement in cybersex is generally considered to be an excessive and uncontrolled use of online sexual activities associated with tangible negative outcomes and functional impairment. To ... [more ▼]

Problematic involvement in cybersex is generally considered to be an excessive and uncontrolled use of online sexual activities associated with tangible negative outcomes and functional impairment. To date, there is no consensus in the literature regarding the conceptualization and labeling of this disorder, or of its diagnosis and assessment (e.g., screening questionnaires and diagnostic criteria). Through a systematic examination of the literature, we emphasize that problematic cybersex is an umbrella construct that regroups various types of distinct dysfunctional online behaviors. Despite a considerable increase in studies on problematic cybersex, no clear diagnostic guidelines exist for clinicians and researchers. Moreover, the factors involved in the development and maintenance of the disorder remain poorly examined, and the evidence regarding valid assessment and treatment are lacking. [less ▲]

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See detailProblematic digital gaming behavior and its relation to the psychological, social and physical health of Finnish adolescents and young adults.
Mannikko, Niko; Billieux, Joël UL; Kaariainen, Maria

in Journal of Behavioral Addictions (2015), 4(4), 281-8

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The aim of this study was to identify problematic gaming behavior among Finnish adolescents and young adults, and evaluate its connection to a variety of psychological, social, and ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The aim of this study was to identify problematic gaming behavior among Finnish adolescents and young adults, and evaluate its connection to a variety of psychological, social, and physical health symptoms. METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted with a random sample of 293 respondents aged from 13 to 24 years. Participants completed an online survey. Problematic gaming behavior was measured with the Game Addiction Scale (GAS). Self-reports covered health measures such as psychological health (psychopathological symptoms, satisfaction with life), social health (preferences for social interaction), and physical health (general health, Body Mass Index [BMI], body discomfort, physical activity). RESULTS: Problematic gaming behavior was found to relate to psychological and health problems, namely fatigue, sleep interference, depression and anxiety symptoms. Multiple linear regression indicated that the amount of weekly gaming, depression and a preference for online social interaction predicted increased problematic gaming symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: This research emphasized that problematic gaming behavior had a strong negative correlation to a variety of subjective health outcomes. [less ▲]

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See detailProblematic Gaming Behaviour in Finnish Adolescents and Young Adults: Relation to Game Genres, Gaming Motives and Self-Awareness of Problematic Use
Männikkö, N.; Billieux, Joël UL; Nordström, T. et al

in International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction (2017), 15

The aim of this study was to explore the relation between Problematic Gaming Behaviour (PGB) and specific psychological factors (gaming motives, self-awareness of problematic gaming behaviour) and ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to explore the relation between Problematic Gaming Behaviour (PGB) and specific psychological factors (gaming motives, self-awareness of problematic gaming behaviour) and structural factors (game genres) among Finnish adolescents and young adults. A national survey of 271 respondents, aged 13 to 24, participated in the study. The study sample was randomly selected from the Population Register Center. Multiple regression analysis was used as a means of examining links between game genres, gaming motives and PGB. In addition, pairwise comparisons of a non-problematic gaming behavior group and a problematic gaming behavior group were used as a means of examining differences across game genre use and self-awareness of PGB. PGB was particularly associated with the use of a group of games encompassing role-playing, progression (e.g., character development), action and strategy features. The findings indicated that entertainment-achievement, social and escapism motives were associated with PGB. On the whole, this study emphasized that specific game genres and playing motives are involved in problematic use of digital game playing. © 2016 Springer Science+Business Media New York [less ▲]

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See detailProblematic involvement in online games: A cluster analytic approach
Billieux, Joël UL; Thorens, G.; Khazaal, Y. et al

in Computers in Human Behavior (2015), 43

Playing online games can become problematic and engender adverse consequences. Several psychological factors have been shown to influence the development and the maintenance of this problematic behavior ... [more ▼]

Playing online games can become problematic and engender adverse consequences. Several psychological factors have been shown to influence the development and the maintenance of this problematic behavior, including impulsivity traits, motives to play (immersion, achievement, social affiliation), and self-esteem. The aim of the current study is to determine whether reliable subtypes of problematic online gamers can be identified. A sample of 1057 online gamers was recruited. Validated questionnaires were used to measure established psychological risk factors (impulsivity, motives to play, self-esteem) and potential consequences of playing (addiction symptoms, positive and negative affect). Actual in-game behaviors were also monitored. Five reliable clusters of gamers were identified (three problematic and two nonproblematic clusters). Cluster comparison revealed that the psychological factors considered are differentially involved in problematic online gaming. At the theoretical level, the results emphasized that problem online gaming depends on a wide range of psychological factors. At the clinical level, the diversity of psychological profiles shown supports the development of personalized (custom-made) interventions targeting specific psychological mechanisms. Overall, our findings suggest that conceptualizing the problematic use of massively multiplayer online role-playing games as "behavioral addiction" is too restrictive and might result in the simplification of heterogeneous and multi-determined problematic behaviors. © 2014, Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailProblematic online sexual activities in men: The role of self‐esteem, loneliness, and social anxiety
Wéry, Aline; Canale, Natale; Bell, Caroline et al

in Human Behavior and Emerging Technologies (2020), 2

Several studies have shown that problematic use of online sexual activities (OSAs) can constitute a dysfunctional coping strategy that reflects a compensatory usage of the Internet. Yet, some specific ... [more ▼]

Several studies have shown that problematic use of online sexual activities (OSAs) can constitute a dysfunctional coping strategy that reflects a compensatory usage of the Internet. Yet, some specific risk factors—widely investigated in the field of general problematic Internet use—have to date been scarcely studied within the context of OSA. Hence, the goal of this study was to test a theoretical model in which self‐esteem, loneliness, and social anxiety are hypothesized to predict the type of OSAs favored and their potential addictive use. To this end, an online survey was conducted in a sample of self‐selected men who used OSAs on a regular basis (N = 209). Results showed that low self‐esteem is positively associated with loneliness and high social anxiety, which were in turn positively related to involvement in two specific OSAs: use of pornography and the search for online sexual contacts. Higher engagement in these OSA activities was related to symptoms of addictive usage. These findings underline the importance in psychological interventions of taking into account the specific OSA practiced to improve self‐esteem and to reduce loneliness and symptoms of social anxiety [less ▲]

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See detailProblematic smartphone use and its relation with anxiety and depression: a survey in a large sample of undergraduates
Liu, Yueheng; Long, Jiang; Billieux, Joël UL et al

in Chinese Journal of Psychiatry (2017), 50(4), 270-275

[Objective] To investigate the differences of socio-demographics and smartphone use features among Chinese college students between problematic smartphone user (PSU) and non-PSU, and to clarify the link ... [more ▼]

[Objective] To investigate the differences of socio-demographics and smartphone use features among Chinese college students between problematic smartphone user (PSU) and non-PSU, and to clarify the link between PSU and psychopathological symptoms (anxiety and depression). [Methods] A total of 1 205 undergraduates from 35 classes of 8 universities or colleges, stratified with different school levels, were selected using the cluster random sampling strategy. The Problematic Cellular Phone Use Questionnaire (PCPUQ) was used to identify problematic use of smartphone use, and Zung Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS) and Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS) were used to measure anxiety and depression symptoms. [Results] The prevalence of PSU among undergraduates was estimated to be 20.6% (207/1 006). There were significant differences between PSU and non-PSU on their major of either science category or humanities category (χ2=11.424 ,P<0.01), grade (χ2=5.868 ,P<0.05), monthly living expense supported by their family (χ2=12.713 ,P<0.01), daily time spent on their smartphones (χ2=20.052, P<0.01), frequency of changing the mobile phones (χ2=14.511 ,P<0.01) and monthly smartphone bill (χ2=13.107, P< 0.01). Furthermore, the self rated anxiety (34.8% (72/207) vs. 14.6% (117/799),χ2=43.704, P<0.01) and depression (36.2%(75/207) vs. 15.4%(123/799), χ2=45.159,P<0.01) were both found more elevated in PSU than non-PSU. [Conclusion] Some common sociodemographic variables and smartphone usage patterns were identified in undergraduates displaying PSU. Moreover, PSU is associated with more elevated anxiety and depression symptoms. Problematic smartphone use and its relation with anxiety and depression: a survey in a large sample of undergraduates (Article in Chinese). Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/318762637_Problematic_smartphone_use_and_its_relation_with_anxiety_and_depression_a_survey_in_a_large_sample_of_undergraduates_Article_in_Chinese [accessed Aug 2, 2017]. [less ▲]

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See detailProblematic smartphone use: An empirically validated model
Pivetta, Erika; Harkin, Lydia; Billieux, Joël UL et al

in Computers in Human Behavior (2019), 100

Given the prominent role that smartphones have in everyday life, research in the field has proliferated. From a theoretical perspective, problematic smartphone use (PSPU) is described as a multi-faceted ... [more ▼]

Given the prominent role that smartphones have in everyday life, research in the field has proliferated. From a theoretical perspective, problematic smartphone use (PSPU) is described as a multi-faceted phenomenon entailing a variety of dysfunctional manifestations (e.g., addictive, antisocial and dangerous use). To date, however, there is still a lack of empirical evidence supporting the identification of PSPU as a potential behavioural addiction. Driven by theory, the aim of the present study was to provide an empirically validated model by testing the contribution of specific factors leading to PSPU. Relationships among individual characteristics (internalised psychopathology, impulsivity and personality traits) and PSPU uses (addictive, antisocial and dangerous) were investigated according to the updated version of the theoretical framework provided by the Pathway Model of problematic smartphone use (Billieux et al., 2015). An online survey was administered to a convenience sample (N = 511) of smartphone users in order to examine their daily engagement, problematic usage patterns and related psychological correlates. Path analysis revealed important information about different PSPU components and results are discussed in light of the available literature. Recommendations for future research are proposed to further investigate the problematic behaviour, including the study of additional variables, such as the fear of missing out (FoMO), nomophobia and excessive social media use. [less ▲]

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See detailProblematic smartphone use: Investigating contemporary experiences using a convergent design
Kuss, Daria J.; Harkin, Lydia; Kanjo, Eiman et al

in International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (2018), 15

Internet-enabled smartphones are increasingly ubiquitous in the Western world. Research suggests a number of problems can result from mobile phone overuse, including dependence, dangerous and prohibited ... [more ▼]

Internet-enabled smartphones are increasingly ubiquitous in the Western world. Research suggests a number of problems can result from mobile phone overuse, including dependence, dangerous and prohibited use. For over a decade, this has been measured by the Problematic Mobile Phone Use Questionnaire (PMPU-Q). Given the rapid developments in mobile technologies, changes of use patterns and possible problematic and addictive use, the aim of the present study was to investigate and validate an updated contemporary version of the PMPU-Q (PMPU-Q-R). A mixed methods convergent design was employed, including a psychometric survey (N = 512) alongside qualitative focus groups (N = 21), to elicit experiences and perceptions of problematic smartphone use. The results suggest the PMPU-Q-R factor structure can be updated to include smartphone dependence, dangerous driving, and antisocial smartphone use factors. Theories of problematic mobile phone use require consideration of the ubiquity and indispensability of smartphones in the present day and age, particularly regarding use whilst driving and in social interactions [less ▲]

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See detailProblematic use of the Internet and self-regulation: a review of the initial studies
Billieux, Joël UL; Van der Linden, Martial

in The Open Addiction Journal (2012), 5

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See detailProblematic use of the mobile phone: A literature review and a pathways model
Billieux, Joël UL

in Current Psychiatry Reviews (2012), 8(4), 299-307

Despite its unambiguous advantages, cellular phone use has been associated with harmful or potentially disturbing behaviors. Problematic use of the mobile phone is considered as an inability to regulate ... [more ▼]

Despite its unambiguous advantages, cellular phone use has been associated with harmful or potentially disturbing behaviors. Problematic use of the mobile phone is considered as an inability to regulate one's use of the mobile phone, which eventually involves negative consequences in daily life (e.g., financial problems). The current article describes what can be considered dysfunctional use of the mobile phone and emphasizes its multifactorial nature. Validated assessment instruments to measure problematic use of the mobile phone are described. The available literature on risk factors for dysfunctional mobile phone use is then reviewed, and a pathways model that integrates the existing literature is proposed. Finally, the assumption is made that dysfunctional use of the mobile phone is part of a spectrum of cyber addictions that encompasses a variety of dysfunctional behaviors and implies involvement in specific online activities (e.g., video games, gambling, social networks, sex-related websites). © 2012 Bentham Science Publishers. [less ▲]

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See detailProblematic video game use as an emotional coping strategy: Evidence from a sample of MMORPG gamers.
Blasi, Maria Di; Giardina, Alessandro; Giordano, Cecilia et al

in Journal of behavioral addictions (2019), 8(1), 25-34

BACKGROUND: A positive relationship between problematic gaming and escapism motivation to play video games has been well established, suggesting that problematic gaming may result from attempts to deal ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: A positive relationship between problematic gaming and escapism motivation to play video games has been well established, suggesting that problematic gaming may result from attempts to deal with negative emotions. However, to date, no study has examined how emotion dysregulation affects both escapism motives and problematic gaming patterns. METHODS: Difficulties in emotion regulation, escapism, and problematic involvement with video games were assessed in a sample of 390 World of Warcraft players. A structural equation modeling framework was used to test the hypothesis that escapism mediates the relationship between emotion dysregulation and problematic gaming. RESULTS: Statistical analyses showed that difficulties in emotion regulation predicted both escapism motives and problematic gaming, and that escapism partially mediated this relationship. CONCLUSION: Our findings support the view that problematic players are likely to escape in online games as a maladaptive coping strategy for dealing with adverse emotional experiences. [less ▲]

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See detailProblematizing Abaclat’s Mass Claims Investment Arbitration Using Domestic Class Actions
Radović, Relja UL

in McGill Journal of Dispute Resolution (2017), 4 (2017-2018)

The 2011 decision on jurisdiction and admissibility in Abaclat and Others v Argentina has started a discussion about mass claims processes in investment treaty arbitration. The tribunal concluded that ... [more ▼]

The 2011 decision on jurisdiction and admissibility in Abaclat and Others v Argentina has started a discussion about mass claims processes in investment treaty arbitration. The tribunal concluded that although proceedings were initiated in aggregate, the continuance of the case contained a representative feature. This determination led them to declare that the applicable procedure could and had to be adapted. Today, the legacy of Abaclat and the availability of mass claims procedural devices in investment treaty arbitration remain questionable: can mass claims investment arbitration be qualified as ‘class-like’? If so, does it satisfy the fundamental principles of arbitration (particularly the principle of consent)? This article takes a comparative approach to answering these questions by putting mass claims investment arbitration procedures and United States class actions processes side-by-side. It argues that mass claims arbitration as construed in Abaclat cannot satisfy fundamental arbitration principles because it fails to observe the inextricable link between the parties’ consent, representative procedure, and representative relief. It is therefore wrong to view mass claims arbitration as an available device for investors in investment treaty arbitration. [less ▲]

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See detailProblematizing science as a primary school discipline: Learning from contingencies and diversities
Schreiber, Catherina UL; Siry, Christina UL; Reuter, Robert UL et al

Poster (2015, September 03)

This paper puts the idea of a contingent nature of science at its fore, asking what we as researchers can learn from seemingly irreconcilable differences in our approaches and interpretations to past ... [more ▼]

This paper puts the idea of a contingent nature of science at its fore, asking what we as researchers can learn from seemingly irreconcilable differences in our approaches and interpretations to past, present and future developments in science education. To do so, we aim to explore the potentials of multi-perspectivity in an academic self-experiment. The idea is to problematize science as a school discipline from different theoretical, disciplinary and methodological standpoints. By taking one concrete example of a Luxembourgian primary school curriculum document, four researchers will independently apply their individual lenses on science as a school discipline. Concretely, the coverage of the hedgehog as a “characteristic animal” in our primary school curriculum will be commented on in historical, sociocultural and pedagogical perspectives. This concrete curricular example is seemingly defined and non disputable as a content theme in primary school science education in Luxembourg, and is also to be found in international curriculum policy documents. Yet a seemingly proven fact can be interpreted in multiple ways, not only to bridge controversies, as it is done so often, but as exploring the differences in a self-reflective manner. Through such multiple interpretations, we are specifically looking for inconsistencies between the four different narratives, instead of focusing on consensual conclusions or firm and consistent patterns. Instead we will follow a multi-layered approach to research in order to undertake a métissage approach to analyzing a component of the science pedagogical practice, allowing the different understandings on the Luxembourgian science curriculum to remain and complement each other in a complex manner. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 205 (41 UL)