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See detailQualification of the Digital Services Tax Under Tax Treaties
Hohenwarter, Daniela; Kofler, Georg; Mayr, Gunter et al

in Intertax, International Tax Review (2019), 47(2), 140-147

Detailed reference viewed: 121 (6 UL)
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See detailQualifying and Measuring Transparency: A Medical Data System Case Study
Spagnuelo, Dayana; Bartolini, Cesare UL; Lenzini, Gabriele UL

in Computers and Security (2020)

Transparency is a data processing principle enforced by the GDPR but purposely left open to interpretation. As such, the means to adhere to it are left unspecified. Article 29 Working Party provides ... [more ▼]

Transparency is a data processing principle enforced by the GDPR but purposely left open to interpretation. As such, the means to adhere to it are left unspecified. Article 29 Working Party provides practical guidance on how to interpret transparency, however there are no defined requirements nor ways to verify the quality of the implementation of transparency. We address this problem. We discuss and define applicable metrics for transparency, propose how measurement can be conducted in an operative system, and suggest a practical way in which these metrics can be interpreted in order to increase confidence that transparency is realised in a system. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 45 (1 UL)
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See detailQUALINET White Paper on Definitions of Immersive Media Experience (IMEx)
Perkis, Andrew; Timmerer, Christian; Baraković, Sabina et al

Report (2020)

Detailed reference viewed: 57 (0 UL)
See detailQualität alltagsintegrierter Sprachbildung & kindliche Sprachentwicklung
Förster, Charis; Fontaine, Janaine; Böhmer, Matthias UL

Presentation (2017, September)

Detailed reference viewed: 84 (0 UL)
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See detailQualität der Kommunikation in der Familie / Qualité de la communication au sein de la famille
Heinz, Andreas UL; Kern, Matthias Robert UL; Residori, Caroline UL et al

E-print/Working paper (2018)

In der HBSC-Studie 2014 sollten die Schüler vier Aussagen zur Qualität der Kommunikation in ihrer Familie auf einer Skala von 1 (= niedrige Qualität) bis 5 (= hohe Qualität) bewerten. Über 80 % vergeben ... [more ▼]

In der HBSC-Studie 2014 sollten die Schüler vier Aussagen zur Qualität der Kommunikation in ihrer Familie auf einer Skala von 1 (= niedrige Qualität) bis 5 (= hohe Qualität) bewerten. Über 80 % vergeben gute Bewertungen im Bereich von 4 oder 5. Rund 12 % der Schüler bewerten die Qualität der Familienkommunikation im mittleren Bereich (3) und 5 % vergeben niedrige Bewertungen (1 oder 2). Ältere Schüler bewerten die Familienkommunikation schlechter als jüngere. Dementsprechend bewerten Schüler des Fondamental die Familienkommunikation besser als Schüler von Sekundarschulen. Schüler, die eine hohe Qualität angeben, berichten eine geringere Zahl von Gesundheitsbeschwerden. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 143 (18 UL)
See detailQualität frühkindlicher Bildung im europäischen Vergleich
Andersen, Katja Natalie UL

in KiTa aktuell HRS - Fachzeitschrift für Leitungen, Fachkräfte und Träger der Kindertagesbetreuung (2016), 24(5), 97

Detailed reference viewed: 47 (6 UL)
See detailQualität in der Tagesbetreuung von Kindern
Peters, Ulla UL

in Ministère de la Famille et de l'Intégration; Entente des Foyers de Jour; Syndicat des Villes et Communes Luxembourgeoises (Eds.) et al Maisons Relais pour Enfants - Le manuel - Das Handbuch (2009)

Detailed reference viewed: 43 (1 UL)
See detailQualität sichern – Leitfaden zur Evaluation und Auswertung von Veranstaltungen
Weis, Daniel UL; Weis, Dominik; Husen, Onno

Learning material (2011)

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (2 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailA qualitative corpus-based study of lecture functions
Deroey, Katrien UL

Scientific Conference (2008, September)

Increasing student and lecturer mobility along with the spread of English as an academic lingua franca (Mauranen, 2006) means a growing number of university lecturers in Europe are delivering at least ... [more ▼]

Increasing student and lecturer mobility along with the spread of English as an academic lingua franca (Mauranen, 2006) means a growing number of university lecturers in Europe are delivering at least some lectures in English. Well-designed English for Academic Purposes (EAP) courses can help lecturers whose first language is not English in meeting this challenge and findings from corpus linguistic research on authentic lectures are invaluable in informing decisions about the development of such courses. However, a comprehensive corpus-based account of language use in English language lectures does not exist, although recent publications by Biber (2006) and Crawford Camiciottoli (2007) constitute significant contributions to such a description. This paper presents the results of a qualitative corpus-based study of common language functions in lectures (e.g. predicting, describing, reporting, interpreting, evaluating) as related to the overall purposes of lectures such as knowledge transfer and the socialization of students into disciplinary communities. The investigation is based on a manual analysis of lectures selected from the British Academic Spoken English (BASE) Corpus. In contrast to most existing studies, this study is motivated by the spoken language needs of lecturers rather than by student (listening comprehension) needs and is not restricted by a focus on pre-determined linguistic features that can be searched and quantified. The current non-quantified language description thus hopes to demonstrate the value of insights that can only come from reading and studying a corpus from a more global perspective using qualitative methods. Biber, D. (2006). University language: a corpus-based study of spoken and written registers. Studies in Corpus Linguistics 23. Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company. Crawford Camiciottoli, B. (2007). The language of business studies lectures. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. [less ▲]

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See detailQualitative interviewing in multilingual research
Kalocsanyiova, Erika UL; Shatnawi, Malika

Scientific Conference (2019, September 27)

A growing body of research in super-diverse societies is conducted, by necessity, in multiple languages. Multilingual research practices can play a fundamental role in empowering participants and ... [more ▼]

A growing body of research in super-diverse societies is conducted, by necessity, in multiple languages. Multilingual research practices can play a fundamental role in empowering participants and privileging their voices, especially in migration-related studies. Yet, questions of cross-language interviewing are for the most part avoided or ignored in mainstream research. This contribution seeks to bring cross-language communication back into the focus of methodological discussions. Our paper builds on multilingual interview material extracted from a two-year linguistic ethnographic research project on forced migrants’ integration trajectories in Luxembourg. It looks at interpreter-mediated research encounters, as well as interviewees’ translation and translanguaging moves. Audio recordings and field notes from collaborative data analysis sessions underpin the data for this contribution. Our examples show that there is merit in fixing our analytical gaze on the minute details of language use across different codes, as these allow for a novel inquiry into specific moments of meaning making, role performances and rapport-building in qualitative interviewing. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 60 (1 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailQualitative Interviewstudie zum Französischunterricht in Luxemburg
Morys, Nancy UL

in Lenz, Thomas (Ed.) Bildungsbericht 2018. Bildungsverläufe und Bildungserfolge (2018)

Detailed reference viewed: 26 (1 UL)
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See detailA qualitative meta-synthesis of reasons for the use or non-use of assistive technologies in the aging population
Abri, Diana UL; Boll, Thomas UL

in GeroPsych: Journal of Gerontopsychology and Geriatric Psychiatry (2019), 32(2), 79-92

Models of the use of assistive technologies (ATs) have only moderate value for predicting older people´s use of ATs. To find further predictors we performed a systematic literature review and – applying ... [more ▼]

Models of the use of assistive technologies (ATs) have only moderate value for predicting older people´s use of ATs. To find further predictors we performed a systematic literature review and – applying an action-theoretical approach – a meta-synthesis of seven qualitative studies about older people´s reasons for use or non-use of ATs. We found 25 reasons referring to user´s beliefs and desires (e.g., about demand, act of using ATs, its consequences) of which 18 were not contained in existing AT use models. Some reasons generalized across ATs (e.g., perceived unreliability), whereas others (e.g., privacy concerns, desire to avoid burden to others) appeared specific to tele-alarm or smart home technology. We discuss findings with respect to improving AT use models and developmental counseling. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 174 (34 UL)
See detailQualitative methodologies, older migrants, and the study of ambivalences.
Karl, Ute UL; Kühn, Boris; Ramos, Anne Carolina UL

Scientific Conference (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (2 UL)
See detailQualitative Research applied: The construction of a typology, illustrated by the example of the Luxembourg Youth Report
Willems, Helmut UL; Weis, Daniel UL

Scientific Conference (2016, February 24)

The method of empirically based construction of types and typologies will be demonstrated using the example of a qualitative study from the Luxembourg Youth Report 2015. This reveals two key challenges of ... [more ▼]

The method of empirically based construction of types and typologies will be demonstrated using the example of a qualitative study from the Luxembourg Youth Report 2015. This reveals two key challenges of qualitative research, namely (1) data resulting from single cases must be aggregated and condensed before being summarized into types, and (2) questions regarding possible generalization and transferability of the results need to be addressed. How, and under which conditions, this process can be put into practice will be illustrated using a typology of young people’s transitions from youth into adulthood developed within the Luxembourg Youth Report 2015. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 172 (16 UL)