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See detailMulticulturalism in Portuguese Migrants from Luxembourg
Barros Coimbra, Stephanie UL; Albert, Isabelle UL; Murdock, Elke UL et al

Scientific Conference (2015, July)

Detailed reference viewed: 115 (12 UL)
See detailMulticulturalism within the context of Luxembourg
Murdock, Elke UL

Conference given outside the academic context (2015)

Detailed reference viewed: 82 (3 UL)
See detailMulticulturalism within the Luxembourg context
Murdock, Elke UL

Doctoral thesis (2014)

Even within a globalizing world, Luxembourg takes an exceptional position with a foreign population of 44%, rising to 68% in the capital, home to a fifth of the country’s population. Luxembourg, and in ... [more ▼]

Even within a globalizing world, Luxembourg takes an exceptional position with a foreign population of 44%, rising to 68% in the capital, home to a fifth of the country’s population. Luxembourg, and in particular its capital, therefore form a “natural laboratory” to examine how an increasingly diverse society is perceived by the majority population who finds itself in the minority. Different facets of multiculturalism were examined in a series of quantitative studies. The first study examined the salience of nationality in the spontaneous self-concept as a function of context. The study found that students in a nationally heterogeneous environment mentioned nationality more frequently in their spontaneous self-concept than those in a nationally homogeneous context. Bringing people of different nationalities together does not diminish awareness of nationalities; on the contrary, salience of nationality is increased, as explained by the distinctiveness paradigm. Within a multicultural society, identification in terms of nationality is therefore more likely. The link between multilingualism and biculturalism was examined in the second study. Luxembourg is not only multicultural in terms of its demographic composition, but multilingual as a country with three officially recognized languages. This study confirmed that Luxembourg participants self-identified as multilingual, but the majority also as monocultural, therefore defying the assumption that bilinguals tend to be bicultural. Language competence was identified as a necessary, but not sufficient condition for biculturalism. Luxembourg participants differed in terms of internalization of language and culture. Those who experienced language as a cultural prime were more likely to self-identify as bicultural. Biculturals in turn reported less conscious effort in switching between cultures. A third study examined how biculturals organize and experience their dual nationalities. The study showed that adolescents growing up in mixed national familie are more likely to self-identify in a bicultural way. They experienced their dual nationalities as complementary and as a source of self-enhancement and pride rather than conflict. These findings were explained within the Acculturation Complexity Framework (ACM). Individuals who feel accountable to a mixed audience, may, after a period of dissonance, develop integrative complexity and a bicultural orientation. In the ACM model, the trigger for the increased cultural attention scope is second culture exposure. The opportunity for second culture exposure is increased in a multicultural society. A final series of studies assessed the attitude towards multiculturalism, defined as the attitude towards the plurally composed society. An empirical study was conducted within a large Luxembourg employer with a predominantly native born workforce. The endorsement of multiculturalism was measured using established multiculturalism scales. The influence of various factors such as demographic variables, inter-group relations variables, language use and individual difference variables such as the human values as measured by the Schwartz Values Structure and the understanding of nationality and their relationship with multiculturalism was examined. The results show a widespread endorsement of the idea of multiculturalism, in the sense of broadening and enriching of horizons. The acceptance of behavioural aspects of living together (i.e. societal participation) is yet to be aligned. Those in favor of multiculturalism focus mainly on intangible aspects whereas more critical voices concentrate on the tangible aspects of living together. Taken all this together, the current studies highlighted the role of language as well as culture contact for the construction of mono- or bicultural identity. Findings did not show however a simple linear relation between these variables but underlined the importance of third-variables moderating or mediating these relationship. This differential result pattern will set the frame for future studies. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 384 (49 UL)
See detailMulticulturalism, Identity and Difference. Experiences of Culture Contact
Murdock, Elke UL

Book published by Palgrave Macmillan (2016)

Multicultural societies are a phenomenon that is increasingly observed worldwide. This book brings together theoretical perspectives and empirical evidence on how culture contact is experienced at the ... [more ▼]

Multicultural societies are a phenomenon that is increasingly observed worldwide. This book brings together theoretical perspectives and empirical evidence on how culture contact is experienced at the individual level. At the heart of this book lies the question of how individuals living within a multicultural society experience the meeting of cultures. The studies were conducted in Luxembourg, a country where the foreign population has reached 45%. Luxembourg is a “natural laboratory” and provides an ideal context in which to study culture contact phenomena and to derive lessons for an increasingly globalized world. The empirical studies indicate a gap between multiculturalist ideas and specific forms of societal participation. The policy implications of the findings are discussed. These include a focus on highlighting similarities between cultures rather than differences, and addressing the issue of reciprocity – expectations of both, the receiving society as well as immigrants. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 241 (22 UL)
See detailMulticulturalisme et démocratie libérale
Sosoe, Lukas UL

Presentation (2014, April)

Detailed reference viewed: 67 (2 UL)
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See detailA multidimensional approach of impulsivity in adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.
Lopez, Regis; Dauvilliers, Yves; Jaussent, Isabelle et al

in Psychiatry research (2015), 227(2-3), 290-5

We aimed to compare adult patients with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and matched controls on four dimensions of impulsivity (urgency, lack of premeditation, lack of perseverance, and ... [more ▼]

We aimed to compare adult patients with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and matched controls on four dimensions of impulsivity (urgency, lack of premeditation, lack of perseverance, and sensation seeking) and to examine the association between impulsivity and ADHD symptoms. The study was conducted on 219 participants: 72 adult ADHD patients and 147 aged and gender matched controls. All participants completed questionnaires measuring the various facets of impulsivity (UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale), ADHD and depressive symptoms severity. Patients were also assessed for ADHD subtypes, mood disorders, and addictive behaviors. ADHD patients exhibited higher urgency, lower premeditation and lower perseverance in comparison to controls. Lack of perseverance showed the strongest association with ADHD (area under curve=0.95). Patients with combined inattentive and hyperactive/impulsive subtypes reported more frequently substance abuse problems and had higher scores on urgency and sensation seeking dimensions of impulsivity than those with predominantly inattentive subtype. We report for the first time a multidimensional evaluation of impulsivity in adult ADHD patients. The UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale may constitute a useful screening tool for ADHD in adults and may help to further understanding the psychological mechanisms underlying the differences between the ADHD subgroups. [less ▲]

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See detailA multidimensional approach to impulsivity changes in mild Alzheimer's disease and control participants: cognitive correlates.
Rochat, Lucien; Billieux, Joël UL; Juillerat Van der Linden, Anne-Claude et al

in Cortex: A Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System and Behavior (2013), 49(1), 90-100

INTRODUCTION: Impulsive behaviors are frequently described in brain-damaged patients, including patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, few studies have examined impulsivity changes and ... [more ▼]

INTRODUCTION: Impulsive behaviors are frequently described in brain-damaged patients, including patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, few studies have examined impulsivity changes and associated cognitive impairments in AD and healthy controls. Consequently, the first aim of this study was to compare patients with mild AD and matched controls on four dimensions of impulsivity (urgency, lack of premeditation, lack of perseverance, and sensation seeking) recently highlighted in the literature. The second objective was to examine the association between impulsivity changes and cognitive performances on executive/attentional tasks in mild AD and healthy controls. METHODS: Thirty patients with mild AD and 30 matched controls were administered a battery of tests that assessed executive and attention processes. In addition, informants of each patient and control completed a short questionnaire designed to assess the changes on the four dimensions of impulsivity (Rochat et al., 2008). RESULTS: Patients with mild AD had higher scores than controls on lack of premeditation and lack of perseverance dimensions of impulsivity, whereas the two groups did not differ on urgency and sensation seeking. Furthermore, patients showed significant decreased performances on measures of inhibition of prepotent responses, set-shifting, and working memory, as well as higher variability of reaction times (RTs) than matched controls. Regression analyses computed on the whole sample emphasized that difficulties in inhibition of prepotent responses significantly predicted higher lack of premeditation, and larger variability of RTs and set-shifting difficulties significantly predicted higher lack of perseverance, even when global cognitive functioning, general processing speed, working memory, and age were controlled for. Urgency and sensation seeking were not associated with any variables. CONCLUSIONS: These results provide valuable insight into the nature of brain systems and cognitive processes underlying impulsive behaviors. In addition, they open up interesting prospects for better comprehension of behavioral and psychological symptoms of AD. [less ▲]

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See detailMultidimensional Approaches to Poverty Measurement: An Empirical Analysis of Poverty in Belgium, France , Germany,Italy and Spain, based on the European Pane
D'Ambrosio, Conchita UL; Deutsch, Joseph; Silber, Jacques

in Applied Economics (2011), 43

This article has three goals. First, we wish to compare three multidimensional approaches to poverty and check to what extent they identify the same households as poor. Second, we aim at better ... [more ▼]

This article has three goals. First, we wish to compare three multidimensional approaches to poverty and check to what extent they identify the same households as poor. Second, we aim at better understanding the determinants of poverty by estimating logit regressions with five categories of explanatory variables: size of the household, age of the head of the household, her gender, marital status and status at work. Third, we introduce a decomposition procedure proposed recently in the literature, the so-called Shapley decomposition, in order to determine the exact marginal impact of each of the categories of explanatory variables. Our empirical analysis is based on data made available by the European Community Household Panel (ECPH). We used its third wave and selected five countries: Belgium, France, Germany, Italy and Spain. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 117 (10 UL)
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See detailMultidimensional child poverty analyses and child-sensitive social protection
Neubourg, Chris De; Boon, Liên; Cebotari, Victor UL et al

in Policy in Focus (2018), 15(3), 13-16

Detailed reference viewed: 45 (4 UL)
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See detailMultidimensional child poverty in the Kingdom of Eswatini
Neubourg, Chris De; Cebotari, Victor UL; Ramful, Nesha et al

Report (2018)

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (0 UL)
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See detailThe Multidimensional Forced-Choice Format as an alternative for rating scales. Current state of research
Wetzel, E; Frick, S; Greiff, Samuel UL

in European Journal of Psychological Assessment (2020), 36

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (0 UL)
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See detailMultidimensional limit theorems for homogeneous sums : a general transfer principle
Nourdin, Ivan UL; Peccati, Giovanni UL; Poly, Guillaume et al

in ESAIM: Probability and Statistics (2016), 20

Detailed reference viewed: 80 (2 UL)
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See detailMultidimensional Poverty and Material Deprivation with Discrete Data
D'Ambrosio, Conchita UL; Bossert, Walter; Chakravarty, Satya

in Review of Income and Wealth (2013), 59

We propose a characterization of a popular index of multidimensional poverty which, as a special case, generates a measure of material deprivation. This index is the weighted sum of the functioning ... [more ▼]

We propose a characterization of a popular index of multidimensional poverty which, as a special case, generates a measure of material deprivation. This index is the weighted sum of the functioning failures. The important feature of the variables that may be relevant for poverty assessments is that they are discrete in nature. Thus, poverty measures based on continuous variables are not suitable in this setting and the assumption of a discrete domain is mandatory. We apply the measure to European Union member states where the concept of material deprivation was initiated and illustrate how its recommendations differ from those obtained from poverty measures based exclusively on income considerations. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 198 (8 UL)
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See detailMultidimensional screening for predicting pain problems in adults: a systematic review of screening tools and validation studies
Veirman, Elke; Van Ryckeghem, Dimitri UL; Depaepe et al

in PAIN Reports (2019)

Abstract Screening tools allowing to predict poor pain outcomes are widely used. Often these screening tools contain psychosocial risk factors. This review (1) identifies multidimensional screening tools ... [more ▼]

Abstract Screening tools allowing to predict poor pain outcomes are widely used. Often these screening tools contain psychosocial risk factors. This review (1) identifies multidimensional screening tools that include psychosocial risk factors for the development or maintenance of pain, pain-related distress, and pain-related disability across pain problems in adults, (2) evaluates the quality of the validation studies using Prediction model Risk Of Bias ASsessment Tool (PROBAST), and (3) synthesizes methodological concerns. We identified 32 articles, across 42 study samples, validating 7 screening tools. All tools were developed in the context of musculoskeletal pain, most often back pain, and aimed to predict the maintenance of pain or pain-related disability, not pain-related distress. Although more recent studies design, conduct, analyze, and report according to best practices in prognosis research, risk of bias was most often moderate. Common methodological concerns were identified, related to participant selection (eg, mixed populations), predictors (eg, predictors were administered differently to predictors in the development study), outcomes (eg, overlap between predictors and outcomes), sample size and participant flow (eg, unknown or inappropriate handlin [less ▲]

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See detailMultidimensional semicircular limits on the free Wigner chaos
Nourdin, Ivan UL; Peccati, Giovanni UL; Speicher, Roland

in The Ascona Proceedings, 2011 (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 103 (2 UL)
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See detailMultidimensional sparse recovery for MIMO channel parameter estimation
Steffens, Christian; Yang, Yang UL; Pesavento, Marius

in Proc. 24th European Signal Processing Conference (2016, August)

Detailed reference viewed: 106 (1 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailMultidimensional views on aging and old age.
Kornadt, Anna Elena UL; Wurm, Susanne

in Danan, Gu; Dupre, Matthew E (Eds.) Encyclopedia of Gerontology and Population Aging (2019)

Detailed reference viewed: 59 (1 UL)
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See detailMultidimensionality in Developmental Conceptions Across Adulthood
Mustafic, Maida UL; Freund, Alexandra M.

in GeroPsych: Journal of Gerontopsychology and Geriatric Psychiatry (2012), 25(2), 57-72

Two studies demonstrate the usefulness of a newly developed, direct assessment method of subjective conceptualizations of development across adulthood. Results of Study 1 (N = 234, 18–83 years) suggest ... [more ▼]

Two studies demonstrate the usefulness of a newly developed, direct assessment method of subjective conceptualizations of development across adulthood. Results of Study 1 (N = 234, 18–83 years) suggest that older adults anticipate stronger decline in four domains of functioning (subjective well-being, social relationships, cognition, physical functioning) than younger and middle-aged adults. Study 2 (N = 166, 20–85 years) showed that older adults’ conceptualizations show less differentiation across domains than those of younger and middle-aged adults’. Results of both studies confirm lifespan notions of multidirectionality (expectations of gains and losses) but also show age-related differences in multidimensionality of developmental conceptions (i.e., differences in expected trajectories between domains). Moreover, results provide evidence that favorable conceptions impact perceived controllability and actual subjective well-being. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 122 (10 UL)