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See detailNational report on the governance of the asylum reception system in Luxembourg
Vianelli, Lorenzo UL; Oesch, Lucas UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Report (2019)

The national report on the governance of the reception system in Luxembourg is one of the seven country reports that are produced within Work Package 3 of the H2020 project CEASEVAL. The report provides ... [more ▼]

The national report on the governance of the reception system in Luxembourg is one of the seven country reports that are produced within Work Package 3 of the H2020 project CEASEVAL. The report provides an overview of the Luxembourgish reception system. More specifically, it focuses on recent transformations that have affected the system, processes of implementation at the national and local levels, and sources of heterogeneity within the national system. It is based on document analysis as well as on 19 semi-structured interviews with a range of different stakeholders who are directly or indirectly involved in the Luxembourgish reception system. The report first provides some historical background on the reception of asylum seekers in Luxembourg by paying specific attention to the main legislative instruments that shaped the initial design of the national reception system. Then, the main revisions that affected the system in the period 2009-2018 are explored alongside their related decision-making processes. This paves the way for an overview of the formal structure of the Luxembourgish reception system. After the discussion of the formal organisation of reception policies in the country, the report moves on to explore the actual functioning of the reception system by investigating implementation practices at the national and local levels. Finally, some examples of heterogeneity in the current provision of reception are discussed, in an attempt to identify drivers of convergence and divergence in the implementation of reception policies. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 59 (14 UL)
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See detailNational report: France
Evrard, Estelle UL; Blondel, Cyril UL

Report (2019)

In France, spatial injustice is usually described as disadvantages related to place that result in the feeling that the local population is left out or unable to shape the locality’s own future. It ... [more ▼]

In France, spatial injustice is usually described as disadvantages related to place that result in the feeling that the local population is left out or unable to shape the locality’s own future. It contrasts with a strong tradition of “égalité des territoires” (“equality between territories”) which shapes the spatial planning policy. Two contrasted case studies have been selected for the RELOCAL project in France. Located in peri-urban post-industrial contexts, they both need to reopen the path towards local development. The EPA Alzette-Belval (Lorraine) is a top-down initiative established through an on-site technical implementation, while Euralens is a more bottom-up, autonomous association in the Nord mining basin. Spatial injustices existed in both localities, and there were a number of similarities (e.g. access to and financing of public services, fair and equitable access to decision-making processes). The national context goes beyond the individual findings for each case, to reflect on their significance in a national context shaped by successive waves of decentralisation and the recent launch of nationally led thematic initiatives to support local development. We found that Euralens and the EPA Alzette-Belval make a direct contribution to greater spatial justice. The EPA Alzette-Belval specifically targets distributive justice, while Euralens targets procedural justice more. These two actions demonstrate that despite decentralisation, the state remains crucial in France. Like the place-based approach promoted at the EU level, France encourages localities to build up their own initiatives to foster local development, while the state provides timely support through dedicated schemes (e.g. ERBM, ÉcoCité, EPA à la française). In this context, regions facing steep challenges (e.g. economic regeneration following the fall of single industries, asymmetric border exchanges and interdependencies) are overwhelmed by the task of effectively mobilising the national tools at their disposal and initiating local development on their own. Nationally led instruments therefore need to be adapted to local geographic, political and social specificities in order to be capable of deploying their full impact. It therefore seems important – especially in a unitary country like France – to keep monitoring spatial disparities and social inequalities, have dedicated channels for territories to bring forward their respective problems, and as a consequence to keep redistributive measures that can be mobilised to address the deepest territorial divides. Too often, potential beneficiaries of EU funding do not apply (i.e. due to the administrative burden, lack of information). Access to EU regional policy should be more open, simpler and based more on impact (including qualitative and quantitative indicators). Open European satellites with dedicated agents in territories facing structural challenges could contribute by enabling these regions and giving “Brussels” a more human and less bureaucratic face. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (0 UL)
See detailNational Reports on France and Luxembourg
Cuniberti, Gilles UL

in European Insolvency Law (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (1 UL)
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See detailNational responses to date during the COVID-19 crisis in the areas of migration and asylum
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL

Presentation (2020, June 17)

The COVID-19 took by surprise most Member States of the European Union, as they underestimated the rapid spread of the contagion in the continent. The response of the Member States was asymmetrical ... [more ▼]

The COVID-19 took by surprise most Member States of the European Union, as they underestimated the rapid spread of the contagion in the continent. The response of the Member States was asymmetrical, individualistic and significantly slow. The first measures taken were to close down the internal borders. The response of the European Union was even slower to the point that and it was not until March 17th 2020 that the external borders were closed. These actions affected legal migration into the European Union from four perspectives: 1) it affected the mobility of those third country nationals who were on temporary stay in the Member States; 2) the entry of third country nationals to do seasonal work; 3) the entry and stay of legal migrants; and 4) the status quo of the third country nationals already residing in the Member States, especially those who have a loss of income. This article will deal with the measures taken by Member States on who to manage the immigration services during the crisis as well as the measures taken in order to deal with overstayers, seasonal workers and other legal migrants. Finally, we will focus in the vulnerable situation that third-country national salaried workers are exposed due to the loss of income or loss of employment in the Member States and the risk of being returned to their country of origin. This presentation will also analyse the access to unemployment benefits. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 61 (0 UL)
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See detailNational responses to date during the COVID-19 crisis in the areas of migration and asylum
Sommarribas, Adolfo UL

Presentation (2020, July 02)

The COVID-19 took by surprise most Member States of the European Union, as they underestimated the rapid spread of the contagion in the continent. The response of the Member States was asymmetrical ... [more ▼]

The COVID-19 took by surprise most Member States of the European Union, as they underestimated the rapid spread of the contagion in the continent. The response of the Member States was asymmetrical, individualistic and significantly slow. The first measures taken were to close down the internal borders. The response of the European Union was even slower to the point that and it was not until March 17th 2020 that the external borders were closed. These actions affected legal migration into the European Union from four perspectives: 1) it affected the mobility of those third country nationals who were on temporary stay in the Member States; 2) the entry of third country nationals to do seasonal work; 3) the entry and stay of legal migrants; and 4) the status quo of the third country nationals already residing in the Member States, especially those who have a loss of income. This article will deal with the measures taken by Member States on who to manage the immigration services during the crisis as well as the measures taken in order to deal with overstayers, seasonal workers and other legal migrants. Finally, we will focus in the vulnerable situation that third-country national salaried workers are exposed due to the loss of income or loss of employment in the Member States and the risk of being returned to their country of origin. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 30 (1 UL)
See detailNational Stock Exchange (NSE) of India Best Paper Prize
Wolff, Christian UL

Diverse speeches and writings (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (2 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailNational Strategies on Language in the European Context Kirsch, Claudine
Kirsch, Claudine UL

in Kenner, Charmian; Hickey, Tina M. (Eds.) Multilingual Europe: Diversity and Learning (2008)

Detailed reference viewed: 39 (0 UL)
See detailThe national youth knowledge networks in Luxembourg.
Residori, Caroline UL

Conference given outside the academic context (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 60 (1 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailNational, European or Cosmopolitan identification? Insights from the heart of Europe
Murdock, Elke UL; Kraus, Xavier; Ferring, Dieter UL

Scientific Conference (2018, July 04)

Trilingual Luxembourg shares borders with three European countries and has a foreign population percentage of 47%. Given this multicultural context we wanted to explore firstly the national, supra ... [more ▼]

Trilingual Luxembourg shares borders with three European countries and has a foreign population percentage of 47%. Given this multicultural context we wanted to explore firstly the national, supra-national or non-national identification among the native population, secondly their stereotypical judgements of EU Member State countries and attitudes towards the European Union and thirdly identify predictors for cosmopolitanism. With a sentence completion task we investigated the reasons for a feeling of belonging to a national entity or lack of it. All 255 participants in our study (Mage = 38.8 SD = 10.7, 59% female) had Luxembourgish citizenship. Forty percent provided a national self-identification (“Luxembourger”), 36% supra-national identification (“European”) and 24% a non-national identification (“cosmopolitan”). These three groups did not differ in terms of stereotypical assessments of the EU Member states regarding warmth and competence (stereotype content model). Yet, when asked about their own assessment of Luxembourg, differences occurred with supra- and non-national identifiers providing significantly lower ratings under the self-rating condition. The three groups differed in their attitude towards the European Union. Low commitment (MEIM subscale), high contact with non-natives and group self-identification predicted cosmopolitanism. There were no effects in terms of self-efficacy, age, gender or socioeconomic status. The content analysis of the sentence completion exercise revealed that affective components dominated arguments for belonging whereas cognitive reasoning governed the statements expressing a lack of belonging. The implications of these findings among natives within the multicultural context of Luxembourg will be discussed – against the rise of nationalism in many European countries and beyond. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 90 (12 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailNational-classical music: Luxembourg
Sagrillo, Damien UL

in Leerssen, Joep (Ed.) Encyclopedia of Romantic Nationalism in Europe (2015)

FULL TEXT Musical nationalism in Luxembourg does not follow the standard European pattern of a folk-inflected exceptionalism vis-à-vis the French/Italian/German mainstream, arising around the mid-19th ... [more ▼]

FULL TEXT Musical nationalism in Luxembourg does not follow the standard European pattern of a folk-inflected exceptionalism vis-à-vis the French/Italian/German mainstream, arising around the mid-19th century. Luxembourg was too small to initiate an own musical nationalism, and had been under foreign control for several centuries before developing into the direction of sovereignty between 1815 and 1890. At this time Luxembourg had only one music school, and no professional orchestra; but amateur ensembles began to emerge all over the country following the liberal constitution of 1848 which granted the right of association. Luxembourg composers born in the mid-century (e.g. Jean-Antoine Zinnen, 1827-1898, the composer of the national anthem) established themselves in the city of Luxembourg and composed for choir and for wind band; there is little overtly national bias in their work. In 1870 the diocese of Luxembourg was founded; this also had an influence on musical life. Henri Oberhoffer (1824-1885), organist at the cathedral of Luxembourg, and Laurent Menager (1835-1902) wrote sacred music; Oberhoffer was a champion of the Cecilian movement in Luxembourg with Franz Xaver Witt ran the periodical Cäcilia from 1862 to 1871. The outstanding composer of this first generation was Laurent Menager, the first to have studied music abroad – in Cologne, where he came in contact with several Romantic composers, among others his composition teacher Ferdinand Hiller. His 63 secular and sacred songs for four-part male choir and his 23 songs for voice and piano are a fine representation of the taste of the period, reminiscent of Schubert. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 102 (5 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailNational-classical music: Luxembourg
Sagrillo, Damien UL

in Leerssen (Ed.) Encyclopedia of Romantic Nationalism in Europe, vol. 2 (2018)

Detailed reference viewed: 26 (1 UL)
See detailNationale Identitätskonstruktionen durch die fiktive Kontinuität. Einige Bemerkungen zum "nationalen" Vergangenheitsbild.
Margue, Michel UL

in Forum für Politik, Gesellschaft und Kultur in Luxemburg (2007), (271), 33-36

Detailed reference viewed: 30 (1 UL)
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See detailNationale Kinderbetreuung in Luxemburg. Eine Bestandsaufnahme
Honig, Michael-Sebastian UL; Haag, Christian UL

in Ministère de la Famille et de l’Intégration, Grand-Duché de Luxembourg (Ed.) Strukturen der Bildung, Erziehung und Betreuung für Kinder bis zu 12 Jahren (2011)

Detailed reference viewed: 420 (152 UL)
See detailNationale Narrative und Erinnerungslandschaften in Wandel
Kmec, Sonja UL; Gilzmer, Mechthild

in Gilzmer, Mechthild; Kmec, Sonja (Eds.) Histoire partagée – Mémoire divisée. Erinnerungskultur in grenzüberschreitender Perspektive (2016)

Detailed reference viewed: 68 (3 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailNationale Traditionen und internationale Trends in der Fernsehgeschichtsschreibung: Eine historiographische Skizze
Fickers, Andreas UL

in Montage AV: Zeitschrift für Theorie und Geschichte audiovisueller Kommunikation (2005), 14(1),

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (2 UL)