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See detailNegative Results on Mining Crypto-API Usage Rules in Android Apps
Gao, Jun UL; Kong, Pingfan UL; Li, Li et al

in Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Mining Software Repositories (2019)

Android app developers recurrently use crypto-APIs to provide data security to app users. Unfortunately, misuse of APIs only creates an illusion of security and even exposes apps to systematic attacks. It ... [more ▼]

Android app developers recurrently use crypto-APIs to provide data security to app users. Unfortunately, misuse of APIs only creates an illusion of security and even exposes apps to systematic attacks. It is thus necessary to provide developers with a statically-enforceable list of specifications of crypto-API usage rules. On the one hand, such rules cannot be manually written as the process does not scale to all available APIs. On the other hand, a classical mining approach based on common usage patterns is not relevant in Android, given that a large share of usages include mistakes. In this work, building on the assumption that “developers update API usage instances to fix misuses”, we propose to mine a large dataset of updates within about 40 000 real-world app lineages to infer API usage rules. Eventually, our investigations yield negative results on our assumption that API usage updates tend to correct misuses. Actually, it appears that updates that fix misuses may be unintentional: the same misuses patterns are quickly re-introduced by subsequent updates. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 32 (3 UL)
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See detailNegative teacher behaviors in the classroom : Linking students’ and teachers’ perspectives.
Baudson, Tanja Gabriele UL; Ulke, L.; Preckel, F.

Scientific Conference (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (0 UL)
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See detailLe négoce des vins de Bordeaux et l'Allemagne de la fin du XVIIe siècle au milieu du XIXe siècle
Butel, Paul; Voss, Peter UL

in Aerts, Erik; Cullen, Louis M.; Wilson, R. G. (Eds.) Production, Marketing and Consumption of Alcoholic Beverages since the Late Middle Ages. Proceedings, Tenth International Economic History Congress, Leuven, August 1990, B-14 (1990)

Detailed reference viewed: 52 (1 UL)
See detailNégocier l'espace frontalier - Implantation du commerce de détail dans la Grande Région
Affolderbach, Julia UL; Becker, Tom UL

in Lebrun, Nicolas (Ed.) Commerce et discontinuités (2011, March)

Detailed reference viewed: 43 (0 UL)
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See detailNégocier l'espace frontalier: IMplantation du commerce de details dans la Grande Région
Affolderbach, Julia UL; Becker, Tom UL

in Lebrun, Nicolas (Ed.) Commerce et Discontinuités (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 77 (19 UL)
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See detailA Negotiated Landscape. The Transformation of San Francisco’s Waterfront since 1950
Hesse, Markus UL

in Local Environment (2017), 22(6), 784-785

Detailed reference viewed: 111 (0 UL)
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See detailNegotiating border regions: Retail development in Luxembourg and the Greater Region
Affolderbach, Julia UL

in Gilles, Peter; Koff, Harlan; Maganda, Carmen (Eds.) et al Theorizing borders through analyses of power relationships (2013)

Cross-border regions in the European Union represent an extraordinary governance environment. Located peripherally at the interface of national planning systems and their various administrative levels ... [more ▼]

Cross-border regions in the European Union represent an extraordinary governance environment. Located peripherally at the interface of national planning systems and their various administrative levels, they contain multiple spatial dimensions of decision-making that don’t always match across borders. Domestic regulations often lack cross-border considerations. Similarly, coordinated international approaches to regulate cross-border development are rarely in place. This legal limbo together with weak enforcement and intentional undermining of existing regulations has led to the perpetuation of highly complex and merely non-transparent decision-making processes. In such a context, spatially relevant projects are frequently subject to international bargaining and informal power struggles that bear high potential for conflicts and hegemonies as recent developments such as the localization of large-scale retail businesses along the Luxembourgish border illustrate. This paper argues that institutionalized planning processes are frequently accompanied or even replaced by new and informal actor relationships where actors capitalize on cross-border inequalities and inconsistencies. Drawing on examples of retail development in the Greater Region it proposes an extended understanding of ‘governance’ that goes beyond integrating multiple spatial scales and acknowledging growing interdependences between government and non-government actors to incorporate multiple actors, informal interactions and new power relationships in border regions. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 87 (8 UL)
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See detailNegotiating continuity: a case study of transitions and cultural elaboration in family business
Adiguna, Rocky UL

Scientific Conference (2016, May 13)

This paper explores the cultural dynamics in family business. By adopting a cultural morphogenetic approach, the paper challenges the common assumptions of culture in family business studies where culture ... [more ▼]

This paper explores the cultural dynamics in family business. By adopting a cultural morphogenetic approach, the paper challenges the common assumptions of culture in family business studies where culture is predominantly defined as coherent values, as shared values, and that values are the core of culture. Drawing from an in-depth single case study of a fourth-generation Luxembourgish family business, this paper shows the value of dualistically analyzing culture in terms of its logical relationship and causal consensus. The case illustrates how contradictory values are contested and reconciled while complementary values are stabilized and reinforced. The paper contributes to highlight the role of history, practice, and power in family business culture. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 101 (7 UL)
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See detailNegotiating novelty: How cultural psychology looks at organizational dynamics
Valsiner, Jaan UL

in Garud, Raghu; Simpson, Barbara; Langley, Ann (Eds.) et al The emergence of novelty in organizations (2015)

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (0 UL)
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See detailNegotiating Plurilingualism in the Classroom
Le Nevez, Adam UL; Hélot, Christine; Ehrhart, Sabine UL

in Ehrhart, Sabine; Hélot, Christine; Le Nevez, Adam (Eds.) Plurilinguisme et Formation des Enseignants: une approche critique Plurilingualism and Teacher Education : A Critical Approach (2010)

Detailed reference viewed: 97 (12 UL)
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See detailNegotiating Sustainable Innovation? Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies in Germany
Canzler, Weert; Galich, Ante UL; Marz, Lutz

in European Journal of Environmental Sciences (2013), 3(1), 65-71

Recently, the German Federal Government made the consequential decision to change its energy program. This not only as a result of the decision to shut down the existing nuclear power plants within the ... [more ▼]

Recently, the German Federal Government made the consequential decision to change its energy program. This not only as a result of the decision to shut down the existing nuclear power plants within the next few years, but also due to vital challenges like climate change and security of energy supply. The shift in the energy-technology paradigm from fossil fuel technologies to regenerative energies might appear as a merely technical process at first glance. Yet, the road to environmental sustainability is paved with economic and social stumbling blocks. The concept of sustainable development is not a blueprint for technical progress but requires deliberations on questions about innovations and governance: How do we want to live and how do we want to get there? This paper traces the negotiations of sustainable innovation on the example of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in Germany. The institutional set up in this field is analyzed and the new organizational actors are identified. These actors attempt to inform and persuade others of the benefits of hydrogen and fuel cells in order to establish a common view that is to guide the further development. However, while they succeeded in mobilizing enough actors to launch the largest Public Private Partnership in this sector in the EU, they could not attain the leadership in the public discourse on these technologies. It seems that an attractive guiding vision of a sustainable, post-fossil energy future and a broad acceptance in daily use would have been major prerequisites for such leadership. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 126 (2 UL)
See detailNegotiating the Borders of the Gender Regime: Developments and Debates on Trans(sexuality) in the Federal Republic of Germany
De Silva, Adrian UL

Book published by transcript (2018)

While social change regarding trans(sexuality) has evolved within an expanding nexus of concepts, practices, regulations and institutions, this process has barely been analysed systematically. Against the ... [more ▼]

While social change regarding trans(sexuality) has evolved within an expanding nexus of concepts, practices, regulations and institutions, this process has barely been analysed systematically. Against the background of legislative processes on gender recognition in a state formation shaped by heteronormative hegemony, this study traces how sexology, the law, federal politics and the trans movement interacted to generate or challenge concepts of trans(sexuality) from the mid-1960s to 2014 in the Federal Republic of Germany. The interdisciplinary study draws upon and contributes to debates in (trans)gender and queer studies, political science, sociology of law, sexology and the social movement. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 166 (66 UL)
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See detailNegotiating the past, present, and future: The Luxembourgish Jewish Museum Project as a Process of Contested memory and imagined futures
Badder, Anastasia UL; Bronec, Jakub UL

Scientific Conference (2019)

There is currently a project underway to establish a Jewish museum in Luxembourg in a restored synagogue just outside the main city center. As this project unfolds, it provides a clear view into the ... [more ▼]

There is currently a project underway to establish a Jewish museum in Luxembourg in a restored synagogue just outside the main city center. As this project unfolds, it provides a clear view into the contestations and negotiations over meaning, representation, Jewishness, and the past, present, and future visions of community that arise in the development of a museum. Ongoing debates over which objects will be included in the museum, how they will be defined, how they will link to other sites of Jewish heritage around the city (through tours, performances, reference, etc.), as well as a hesitancy by many to donate family objects all point to issues around the construction of collective memory, communal cultural heritage, and multiple narratives of the past and how these are erased in the process of producing heritage as a series of museum objects. These debates also highlight concerns about how the contemporary community – which is multilingual, multinational, and multi-denominational – will be represented; in other words, who will be included in representations of the community and how will the contemporary community be defined, if at all? Finally, ongoing discussions around what will be emphasized or downplayed indicate the contested nature, not only of the past, but also of collective visions of the future as constituted through representations of heritage. In particular, negotiations over how to represent the Holocaust reflect a desire by some to fit the museum into developing narratives of cosmopolitanism, interfaith, and intercultural relations and a drive by others to represent family narratives and engage in a project ‘against forgetting’ in order to ensure a particular kind of future. And so, using this project as a case study, I seek to draw attention to the ways in which the construction of a heritage regime is at once a negotiation over narratives of the past, shared present identities, and collective visions of the future and the discourses and social processes at work within these debates. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 69 (12 UL)
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See detailNegotiating the precautionary principle: Regulatory and institutional roots of divergent US and EU positions
König, Ariane UL

in International Journal of BioTechnology (2002), 4(1), 61-81

The precautionary principle has been a bone of contention in international negotiations on the governance of environmental and health risks. The US administration and European institutions often present ... [more ▼]

The precautionary principle has been a bone of contention in international negotiations on the governance of environmental and health risks. The US administration and European institutions often present opposing views on whether formal references to precaution help or hinder the global governance of risk, in particular where linked to world trade. The European Commission official position, backed by Council, Parliament and some Member States, advocates the principle's use in legal texts and pushes for the elaboration of international guidelines for its application. The proposed guidelines, whilst explicitly conforming to basic principles of trade law, include recommendations on broad socio-economic impact analyses of alternative risk mitigation measures and emphasise political aspects of decisions on risk. The US administration's official position papers oppose references to precaution and socio-economic impact analysis in international laws and guidelines on risk analysis. They mainly cite fears of abuse of the concept as guise for protectionist measures. In each administration a wide range of state and non-state actors with disparate views inform policy makers who then have to adopt one coherent position. This article suggests that overarching differences in the negotiating positions adopted by the US and European institutions, often attributed to culturally and politically rooted biases on risk and uncertainty, are also reflected in institutional practices and regulatory frameworks of the two jurisdictions. It recommends taking disparate institutional structures and regulatory frameworks into account in future deliberations on international guidelines on risk analysis. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 104 (5 UL)
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See detailNegotiating the Web of the Past
Schafer, Valerie UL; Musiani, Francesca; Borelli, Marguerite

in French Journal for Media Research (2016)

The material, practical, theoretical elements of Web archiving as an ensemble of practices and a terrain of inquiry are inextricably entwined. Thus, its processes and infrastructures – often discreet and ... [more ▼]

The material, practical, theoretical elements of Web archiving as an ensemble of practices and a terrain of inquiry are inextricably entwined. Thus, its processes and infrastructures – often discreet and invisible – are increasingly relevant. Approaches inspired by Science and Technology Studies (STS) can contribute to shed light on the shaping of Web archives. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 75 (1 UL)
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See detailNeighborhood Features Help Detecting Non-Technical Losses in Big Data Sets
Glauner, Patrick UL; Meira, Jorge Augusto UL; Dolberg, Lautaro et al

in Proceedings of the 3rd IEEE/ACM International Conference on Big Data Computing Applications and Technologies (BDCAT 2016) (2016)

Electricity theft occurs around the world in both developed and developing countries and may range up to 40% of the total electricity distributed. More generally, electricity theft belongs to non ... [more ▼]

Electricity theft occurs around the world in both developed and developing countries and may range up to 40% of the total electricity distributed. More generally, electricity theft belongs to non-technical losses (NTL), which occur during the distribution of electricity in power grids. In this paper, we build features from the neighborhood of customers. We first split the area in which the customers are located into grids of different sizes. For each grid cell we then compute the proportion of inspected customers and the proportion of NTL found among the inspected customers. We then analyze the distributions of features generated and show why they are useful to predict NTL. In addition, we compute features from the consumption time series of customers. We also use master data features of customers, such as their customer class and voltage of their connection. We compute these features for a Big Data base of 31M meter readings, 700K customers and 400K inspection results. We then use these features to train four machine learning algorithms that are particularly suitable for Big Data sets because of their parallelizable structure: logistic regression, k-nearest neighbors, linear support vector machine and random forest. Using the neighborhood features instead of only analyzing the time series has resulted in appreciable results for Big Data sets for varying NTL proportions of 1%-90%. This work can therefore be deployed to a wide range of different regions. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 141 (11 UL)
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See detailNeighborhood green and services diversity effects on land prices: evidence from a multilevel hedonic analysis in Luxembourg
Glaesener, Marie-Line UL; Caruso, Geoffrey UL

in Landscape & Urban Planning (2015), 143

The article aims at revealing the role of green space diversity and the mix of neighborhood services on the price of residential land in Luxembourg. We use a multilevel approach to estimate a hedonic ... [more ▼]

The article aims at revealing the role of green space diversity and the mix of neighborhood services on the price of residential land in Luxembourg. We use a multilevel approach to estimate a hedonic model in order to benefit from the hierarchical structure of the data and to reveal spatial heterogeneity in the valuation of these neighborhood qualities. In addition to standard accessibility and socio-economic variables, we include geographical variables in the form of neighborhood mix indices and a Shannon diversity index of land-uses. Via a spatial cross-regressive specification we also test whether our nested levels are able to capture most of the spatial dependence. Our results show that the presence of a mix of services and green space does not directly impact prices, but that the diversity of land-uses (Shannon index) matters, and has negative effects when considered within immediate proximity and positive effects within a walking distance. Land use effects however vary spatially and emphasize the contrast between regions that are particularly attractive and picturesque, and the former industrial conurbation. In our case we also show the ability of the multilevel approach to capture spatial auto-correlation effects. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 190 (6 UL)