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See detailDie menschliche Natur und ihre Ethik
Sosoe, Lukas UL

in Gattungsethik. Schutz für das Menschengeschlecht ? (2005)

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See detailLes mensonges populistes
Scuto, Denis UL; Grasser, Fabien

Speeches/Talks (2018)

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See detailMenstrual phase and metabolic state effects on the startle eye blink magnitude
de Sá, D. F.; Strelzyk, F.; Römer, S. et al

in Kurzbeiträge Psychologie und Gehirn 2010 (2010)

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See detailMental Arithmetic and Number Sense: Insights from Eye-Tracking.
Guillaume, Mathieu UL; Content, Alain

Scientific Conference (2010)

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See detailMental arithmetic in the bilingual brain: Language matters.
Van Rinsveld, Amandine; Dricot, Laurence; Guillaume, Mathieu UL et al

in Neuropsychologia (2017), 101

How do bilinguals solve arithmetic problems in each of their languages? We investigated this question by exploring the neural substrates of mental arithmetic in bilinguals. Critically, our population was ... [more ▼]

How do bilinguals solve arithmetic problems in each of their languages? We investigated this question by exploring the neural substrates of mental arithmetic in bilinguals. Critically, our population was composed of a homogeneous group of adults who were fluent in both of their instruction languages (i.e., German as first instruction language and French as second instruction language). Twenty bilinguals were scanned with fMRI (3T) while performing mental arithmetic. Both simple and complex problems were presented to disentangle memory retrieval occuring in very simple problems from arithmetic computation occuring in more complex problems. In simple additions, the left temporal regions were more activated in German than in French, whereas no brain regions showed additional activity in the reverse constrast. Complex additions revealed the reverse pattern, since the activations of regions for French surpassed the same computations in German and the extra regions were located predominantly in occipital regions. Our results thus highlight that highly proficient bilinguals rely on differential activation patterns to solve simple and complex additions in each of their languages, suggesting different solving procedures. The present study confirms the critical role of language in arithmetic problem solving and provides novel insights into how highly proficient bilinguals solve arithmetic problems. [less ▲]

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See detailMental Arithmetic: Eye Movement Correlates of Calculation Strategies
Guillaume, Mathieu UL; Nys, Julie; Content, Alain

Poster (2009)

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See detailMental disorders and personality characteristics in parents of patients with eating disorders
Rost, Silke UL; Kappel, Viola; Schneider, Nora et al

Poster (2013, May 25)

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See detailMental disorders in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Vögele, Claus UL; von Leupoldt, Andreas

in Respiratory Medicine (2008), 102

Recent research using questionnaire measures has demonstrated high prevalence rates of mental disorders in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, clinical interviews and clinical rather ... [more ▼]

Recent research using questionnaire measures has demonstrated high prevalence rates of mental disorders in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, clinical interviews and clinical rather than healthy control groups have rarely been employed. The aim of the present study was to assess mental disorders in patients with COPD with advanced methodology, to identify moderating factors explaining mental co-morbidities and to compare results with a clinical control group without COPD. A standardized clinical interview (F-DIPS) and a range of questionnaires were used to assess mental disorders, perceived physical symptoms and cognitions in 20 hospitalized patients with mild-to-moderate COPD (mean FEV(1)/VC (%)=61.3). Results were compared with a hospitalized clinical control group without pulmonary dysfunction (CCG; N=20). Results showed that 55% of patients with COPD received a diagnosis of a mental disorder compared to 30% of CCG patients. All principal mental diagnoses in the COPD group were anxiety disorders (especially Panic Disorder with Agoraphobia), while CCG patients received a wider range of diagnoses (anxiety, pain, alcohol abuse). There was no systematic association between anxiety levels and respiratory function in the whole COPD group, but a positive correlation between anxiety levels and perceived physical symptoms (p<0.001) as well as negative cognitions (p<0.001 and p<0.05, respectively) for COPD patients with anxiety disorder (N=11). The present results confirm the high prevalence rate of anxiety in patients with COPD and suggest further that anxiety in COPD patients may be mediated by cognitive processes. These findings are discussed in terms of their implications for treatment. [less ▲]

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See detailMental health (GHQ12; CES-D) and attitudes towards the value of work among inmates of a semi-open prison and the long-term unemployed in Luxembourg
Baumann, Michèle UL; Meyers, Raymond UL; Le Bihan, Etienne UL et al

in BMC Public Health (2008), 8(214),

Aim: To analyse the relationships between mental health and employment commitment among prisoners and the long-term unemployed (LTU) trying to return to work. Method: Fifty-two of 62 male inmates of a ... [more ▼]

Aim: To analyse the relationships between mental health and employment commitment among prisoners and the long-term unemployed (LTU) trying to return to work. Method: Fifty-two of 62 male inmates of a semi-open prison (Givenich Penitentiary Centre, the only such unit in Luxembourg), and 69 LTU registered at the Luxembourg Employment Administration completed a questionnaire exploring: 1) mental health (measured by means of scales GHQ12 and CES-D); 2) employment commitment; 3) availability of a support network, selfesteem, empowerment; and 4) socio-demographic characteristics. Results: Compared with LTU, inmates were younger, more had work experience (54.9% vs 26.1%), and more were educated to only a low level (71.1% vs 58.0%). The link between employment commitment and mental health in the LTU was the opposite of that seen among the prisoners: the more significant the perceived importance of employment, the worse the mental health (GHQ12 p = 0.003; CES-D p < 0.001) of the LTU; in contrast, among prisoners, the GHQ12 showed that the greater the perceived value of work, the lower the psychic distress (p = 0.012). Greater empowerment was associated with less depression in both populations. The education levels of people who did not reach the end of secondary school, whether inmates or LTU, were negatively linked with their mental equilibrium. Conclusion: The two groups clearly need professional support. Future research should further investigate the link between different forms of professional help and mental health. Randomized controlled trials could be carried out in both groups, with interventions to improve work commitment for prisoners and to help with getting a job for LTU. For those LTU who value employment but cannot find it, the best help may be psychological support. [less ▲]

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See detailMental health and wellbeing in adolescence: The role of child attachment and parents' representations of their children
Decarli, Alessandro UL

Doctoral thesis (2019)

The aim of the current research was to explore the effects of attachment on emotion regulation, autonomy and relatedness, and behavioral problems in adolescence, and how attachment is in turn influenced ... [more ▼]

The aim of the current research was to explore the effects of attachment on emotion regulation, autonomy and relatedness, and behavioral problems in adolescence, and how attachment is in turn influenced by parental reflective functioning (PRF), parenting behaviors (operationalized in terms of behaviors promoting and undermining autonomy relatedness) and parenting stress (in terms of cortisol reactivity). Participants were 49 adolescents (11 to 17 years old) and their mothers (N = 40) and fathers (N = 28). We assessed adolescents’ attachment representations with the Friends and Family Interview (FFI), PRF with the Parent Development Interview (PDI), adolescents’ autonomy and relatedness, and parenting behaviors with the Family Interaction Task (FIT), and behavioral problems with the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) and the Youth Self-Report (YSR). The first study showed that mothers had significantly lower PRF and displayed more psychologically controlling behaviors in the interactions with their children than fathers. Rather than gender per se, high levels of PRF were the best predictors of autonomy support, whereas lower levels of PRF predicted more psychological control. Stress in the context of parenting was neither related to autonomy support nor to psychological control, which were best predicted by divorced family status. Finally, PRF mediated the relation between cortisol reactivity and both autonomy support and psychological control. The results of the second study suggest that higher levels of both maternal and paternal reflective functioning (RF) predict attachment security, whereas lower maternal RF and higher levels of maternal hostile parenting behaviors are the best predictors of disorganized attachment. Internalizing problem behavior is best predicted by disorganized attachment and externalizing symptoms are best predicted by dismissing attachment. These findings indicate that maternal behaviors play a mediating role and might be the primary route through which mothers’ RF is translated and communicated in the relationship with their adolescent children. Moreover, lower maternal RF and hostile and threatening behaviors may have long term negative effects in adolescence, contributing to attachment disorganization and poorer mental health. In the third study the results showed that disorganized adolescents displayed higher heart rate variability (HRV) than organized ones, both during the FFI and during the FITs. Dismissing adolescents showed a more pronounced increase in HRV during the FFI than those classified as secure and preoccupied; however, there were no differences between these groups in HRV during the FITs. The results suggest that disorganized adolescents had more difficulties in regulating their emotions both during the FFI and during the FIT, whereas dismissing individuals seemed effectively challenged only during the interview. The findings point to the potential utility of interventions aimed at enhancing attachment security, thus allowing a better psychological adjustment, and at improving PRF, especially in divorced families, given its protective effect on parenting stress and parenting behaviors. Clinical implications are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailMental models of growth.
Klapproth, Florian UL

in Helfrich, H.; Zillekens, M.; Hölter, E. (Eds.) Culture and development in Japan and Germany. (2006)

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (0 UL)
See detailMental Retirement and Non-Contributory Pensions for the Elderly Poor in Peru
Olivera Angulo, Javier UL; Novella, Rafael

E-print/Working paper (2014)

This paper analyses the effects of retirement on cognitive abilities for the elderly poor on the basis of the “mental retirement” effect that accompanies retirement. Given the recent emergence and ... [more ▼]

This paper analyses the effects of retirement on cognitive abilities for the elderly poor on the basis of the “mental retirement” effect that accompanies retirement. Given the recent emergence and expansion of non-contributory pension programs to alleviate poverty in old-age across low and middle income countries, attention should be pay to the potential acceleration of cognitive decline when individuals retire, i.e. when there is a decrease in their engagement on cognitive demanding activities. We use a unique and recent survey of the poor elderly in Peru (ESBAM) which includes a cognitive test and serves as the baseline for a non-contributory pension program. We find a significant negative effect of retirement on cognitive ability after controlling for a number of demographics and objective health measures, and even after applying instrumental variables to deal with the potential endogeneity of retirement. [less ▲]

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See detailMental strain and chronic stress among a community sample of university students with irritable bowel syndrome symptoms
Gulewitsch, Marco; Enck, Paul; Hautzinger, Martin et al

in Gastroenterology Research & Practice (2013)

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See detailMental stress induced changes in high-frequency HRV can be explained by vagal withdrawal
Kuehl, L. K.; Deuter, C.; Richter, S. et al

in Abstracts of the 41st International Society of Psychoneuroendocrinology (2011)

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See detailMentale Modelle beim Verstehen von Personbeschreibungen: Konsistenz der Information und Kohärenz des Textes.
Wintermantel, Margret; Krolak-Schwerdt, Sabine UL

Scientific Conference (2000, September)

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See detailMentales Training ist keine Zauberei
Steffgen, Georges UL

Article for general public (1990)

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See detailMentalization and Criterion A of the AMPD: Results from a clinical and nonclinical sample
Zettl, M.; Volkert, J.; Vögele, Claus UL et al

in Personality Disorders: Theory, Research, and Treatment (in press)

Objective: Criterion A of the alternative model for the classification of personality disorders in the DSM-5 introduced the Level of Personality Functioning Scale (LPFS), a dimensional model for the ... [more ▼]

Objective: Criterion A of the alternative model for the classification of personality disorders in the DSM-5 introduced the Level of Personality Functioning Scale (LPFS), a dimensional model for the assessment of impairments in self and interpersonal functioning. The LPFS was developed based on a review of different measures of personality functioning, such as the Reflective Functioning Scale, a measure of mentalizing. This study investigated the empirical overlap between LPFS and mentalization. Methods: The study sample included adult inpatients (n = 55) with a mental disorder and a healthy adult control group (n = 55). All participants were examined regarding the LPFS using the Semi-Structured Interview for Personality Functioning DSM-5 (STiP-5.1); mentalizing was assessed with the Brief Reflective Functioning Interview and coded with the Reflective Functioning Scale. We used structural equation modeling to investigate the relationship between LPFS domains and mentalization. Correlation analysis was used to examine the agreement between interview-rated LPFS and self-report measures of personality dysfunction. Results: All domains of the LPFS were significantly related to mentalizing. Interview-rated LPFS was significantly associated with self-reported personality dysfunction. Conclusion: The findings support the notion that the LPFS and mentalization share a strong conceptual and operational overlap by demonstrating that both constructs are empirically interrelated. The results yield further support for the validity of the LPFS as a dimensional model for the assessment of personality disorder severity. [less ▲]

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