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See detailMultilingual Philology and National Literature: Re-Reading Classical Texts. An Introduction
Dembeck, Till UL

in Critical Multilingualism Studies (2017), 5(3),

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (0 UL)
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See detailMultilingual Philology and National Literatures: Re-Reading Classical Texts
Dembeck, Till UL

in Critical Multilingualism Studies (2017), 5(3),

Detailed reference viewed: 47 (1 UL)
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See detailMultilingual practices of university students and changing forms of multilingualism in Luxembourg
De Bres, Julia UL; Franziskus, Anne UL

in International Journal of Multilingualism (2014), 11(1), 62-75

With its own national language, Luxembourgish, and three languages of administration, French, German and Luxembourgish, Luxembourg has long been a very multilingual country. The nature of this ... [more ▼]

With its own national language, Luxembourgish, and three languages of administration, French, German and Luxembourgish, Luxembourg has long been a very multilingual country. The nature of this multilingualism is now changing, due to the rising proportion of migrants in the country, who now make up 43% of the resident population. The changing demographic profile of Luxembourg is reflected in a diversification of language practices within this already highly multilingual context. This article focuses on one group of people who exemplify these changes, 24 students of diverse national and language backgrounds at the University of Luxembourg. Using data from a language diaries exercise conducted as part of an introductory course on multilingualism, we examine the reported multilingual practices of the students and consider what these language practices reveal about traditional and newer forms of multilingualism in Luxembourg. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 115 (9 UL)
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See detailA Multilingual Society at the Romance-Germanic Language Border
Fehlen, Fernand UL

in Language Contact at the Romance-Germanic Language Border (2002)

Detailed reference viewed: 50 (5 UL)
See detailMultilingual universities and the monolingual mindset
Weber, Jean-Jacques UL; Horner, Kristine

in de Saint-Georges, Ingrid; Weber, Jean-Jacques (Eds.) Multilingualism and Multimodality: Current Challenges for Educational Studies (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 98 (9 UL)
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See detailMultilinguale Bürger: Welche Geschichte, Bedeutung und Organisationsformen hat(-te) Fremdsprachenunterricht in einer traditionell mehrsprachigen Gesellschaft (am Beispiel Luxemburg)?
Schreiber, Catherina UL

in Doff, Sabine (Ed.) Heterogenität im Fremdsprachenunterricht. Impulse – Rahmenbedingungen – Kernfragen – Perspektiven (2016)

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See detailMultilingualism and Early Education: An Ethnography of Language Practices and Processes of Institutionalisation in Luxembourgish Early Childcare Settings
Seele, Claudia UL

Doctoral thesis (2015)

During the last twenty years, the Luxembourgish system of early childhood education and care (ECEC) has been undergoing some considerable transformations in light of growing demands by social, economic ... [more ▼]

During the last twenty years, the Luxembourgish system of early childhood education and care (ECEC) has been undergoing some considerable transformations in light of growing demands by social, economic and educational policies. In the multilingual context of Luxembourg, these demands are especially complex, ranging from language promotion and school preparation to contributing to social cohesion and to the integration of a heterogeneous society. The early educational practice today is thus confronted with multiple, at times also divergent expectations. Instead of asking how effectively educational practices might meet these demands and expectations, my research rather takes a non-normative approach by investigating how multilingualism is actually dealt with in the everyday practice of the day care centres. Drawing on praxeological and institutional perspectives as analytical tools, the thesis aims at a better understanding of the everyday accomplishment of the early educational practice in light of these societal developments. Language is thus regarded as a social practice, putting the focus on the actual doing of language and its contribution to the practical enactment of an institutional order. Institutionalisation, here, is understood as the intricate processes of referring and answering to external expectations in everyday practice in order to negotiate what ‘early childhood education and care’ actually is and means. Hence, not everything that happens in educational fields is per se ‘education’; rather it has to be performed and practically constituted as such in response to certain institutionalised norms, values and expectations. In order to investigate how language practices contribute to processes of institutionalisation in ECEC, an ethnographic research has been carried out in three state-funded Luxembourgish day care centres over the course of three years. Pertinent questions that guided my observations and analyses were for example: What different kinds of language practices can be observed in the centres? How are these language practices, on the one hand, conducive to the accomplishment of an institutional order and are, on the other hand, themselves constrained by this order? What are the respective parts of adults and children in these processes? How is early education thereby constituted but also challenged or transformed? Data analysis is based on a reflexive and constructivist Grounded Theory approach and yielded several interrelated aspects of language-mediated institutionalisation processes: First, language serves to constitute institutional boundaries and to differentiate the pedagogical social space from the ‘outside’ or ‘everyday’ world. Second, language also contributes to the creation of an institutional order ‘inside’ this pedagogical space and helps to position actors within this order. Third, language is part of processes of routinisation and incorporation that serve to stabilise the institutional practice. Finally, language is also involved in representing the early educational practice vis-à-vis its constitutive outside, such as the family and the school, thus supporting its claims to legitimacy. These processes, however, are not as straightforward as it may seem, because language also plays a part in destabilising processes of institutionalisation and bringing forward institutional changes. For example, language practices also transcend and fracture the monolingual imaginings of pedagogical space. They may not only constitute and support but also challenge and resist the institutional order as well as question its legitimacy. The study raises some important further questions that are addressed in the final chapter: How can ethnographic research contribute to processes of practice development in ECEC? How do institutional factors both enable and constrain the early educational practice? In what ways do the children themselves contribute to the practical accomplishment of early educational realities? What are the limitations of the study and further lines of inquiry for future research? [less ▲]

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See detailMultilingualism and language learning: A study of Portuguese immigrant children growing up in a multilingual society
Engel de Abreu, Pascale UL

Poster (2010, January)

Working memory is suggested to play a crucial role in children’s native and foreign language acquisition. The major aim of the present study was to explore how growing up with an immigrant background ... [more ▼]

Working memory is suggested to play a crucial role in children’s native and foreign language acquisition. The major aim of the present study was to explore how growing up with an immigrant background might affect children’s linguistic and working memory abilities. Twenty 7-year old Portuguese children from Luxembourg, who speak Portuguese at home and acquire Luxembourgish in a natural setting and German through scholastic instruction, participated in the study. Children completed several measures of verbal short-term memory (digit recall and nonword repetition) and complex working memory span tasks (counting recall and backwards digit recall) in Luxembourgish and in Portuguese. Participants were further assessed on vocabulary measures in Portuguese, Luxembourgish, and German, and on syntactic comprehension in Luxembourgish and German. The Portuguese children were compared to three groups of monolingual speakers: 20 Luxembourgish children living in Luxembourg and 40 Portuguese speaking children growing up in Brazil. The Brazilian children were recruited from families of high and low socio-economical status (SES) with 20 children in each group. Participants in the Luxembourgish sample were of high SES and the Portuguese children were of lower SES. Groups were matched on age, nonverbal ability, and gender. The results showed that in the Portuguese immigrant children, language competences in Portuguese, Luxembourgish, and German were at an equivalent level that fell below the linguistic competence of native speakers from Brazil and from Luxembourg. For the working memory measures the data showed first that the Portuguese children performed equally well in the Luxembourgish and Portuguese versions of the digit recall, backwards digit recall, and counting recall tasks, and second that the Portuguese children’s performance in these three measures did not differ from their monolingual peers from Luxembourg and Brazil. For nonword repetition the results showed that the Portuguese children performed equally well to their Brazilian counterparts in the repetition of the Portuguese sounding nonwords whereas their performance in the repetition of the Luxembourgish nonwords was below that of the native Luxembourgish speakers. This latter finding is consistent with the position that verbal short-term memory performance is better for familiar rather than unfamiliar lexical material. Despite normal general cognitive functions, as documented by the working memory measures, immigrant children showed significantly reduced language performance that can not be easily explained by differences in wealth or other socio economic factors. Instead, the findings appear to be a direct consequence of growing up as an immigrant in a multilingual society raising the question of the necessity of specific language support for immigrant children growing up in a multilingual society. The results also have important practical utility: Whereas language assessments based on measurements of vocabulary may overestimate language learning difficulties in children with an immigrant background working memory measures might not. As working memory measures are highly associated with children’s language learning and more general academic progress, these tests can provide methods of identifying children with potential learning difficulties that are unlikely to be distorted by differences in wealth or other significant environmental factors that have an impact on language learning opportunities. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 197 (8 UL)
See detailMultilingualism and Mobility in Europe: Policies and Practices
Horner, Kristine; de Saint-Georges, Ingrid UL; Weber, Jean-Jacques UL

Book published by Peter Lang (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 189 (10 UL)
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See detailMultilingualism and multimodality in Luxembourgish early childhood education
Andersen, Katja Natalie UL

in Grucza, Sambor; Olpinska-Szkielko, Magdalena; Romanowski, Piotr (Eds.) Advances in understanding multilingualism: A global perspective (2016)

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See detailMultilingualism and Multimodality: Current Challenges for Educational Studies
de Saint-Georges, Ingrid UL; Weber, Jean-Jacques UL

Book published by Sense Publishers (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 152 (16 UL)
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See detailMultilingualism and Specific Language Impairment
Engel de Abreu, Pascale UL

Conference given outside the academic context (2014)

Is a multilingual education beneficial for children? What are the optimal conditions under which a child can become perfectly multilingual? When should we be concerned about a multilingual child's ... [more ▼]

Is a multilingual education beneficial for children? What are the optimal conditions under which a child can become perfectly multilingual? When should we be concerned about a multilingual child's language skills? What are the signs of Specific Language Impairment in a child who speaks more than one language? Developmental psychologist and Associate Professor in multilingual cognitive development at the University of Luxembourg Pascale Engel de Abreu will address these questions based on what the research evidence tells us. Practical questions regarding multilingual education will also be discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailMultilingualism as capital: Linguistic repertoires of immigrant entrepreneurs
Serwe, Stefan Karl UL

Presentation (2012, December 17)

Integrating migrants into national labour markets is arguably of perennial concern for governments across Europe. Self-employment or entrepreneurship has been identified as a possible route to active ... [more ▼]

Integrating migrants into national labour markets is arguably of perennial concern for governments across Europe. Self-employment or entrepreneurship has been identified as a possible route to active professional participation (Light & Gold 2001, Leicht et al. 2012). Studies of immigrant businesses identified multilingual language proficiency as an important aspect of their success (Light 2007). On the one hand, heritage language proficiency may provide the means to maintain advantageous social network ties to coethnic business partners (Aldrich & Waldinger 1990). On the other, sustainable growth is apparently directly related to certain levels of proficiency of the main language of the economy (Nekvapil 2009, Kloosterman 2010). While studies in applied linguistics have stressed the pragmatic impact of multilingualism in service encounters in entrepreneurial contexts (e.g. Leung 2009, Collier 2006, 2010, 2011), I believe that more work needs to be done in accounting for the value of multilingualism across the whole range of linguistic practices that self employment requires. The aim of this presentation is to take a first step into this direction by investigating the ways immigrant business owners navigate professional practices linguistically. For this presentation I intend to examine autobiographic narratives of five successful female business owners with Asian roots who have set up businesses in the borderlands of Germany, Luxemburg and France, so as to reconstruct the ways these individuals employ and develop their linguistic repertoires in connection to their workplace practices. The paper shall thus shed some empirical light on commonly held assumptions about heritage language use as an asset and majority language(s) use as a problem in such professional settings. [less ▲]

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See detailMultilingualism as Migration. Remarks on Literature, Philology, and Culture
Dembeck, Till UL

E-print/Working paper (2017)

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See detailMultilingualism at the University of Luxembourg in Times of Globalization
Hu, Adelheid UL

in Margue, Michel (Ed.) Université du Luxembourg : [decem]: 2003-2013 (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 161 (19 UL)
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See detailMultilingualism at the University of Luxembourg: policy, practice and attitudes
Deroey, Katrien UL; Lejot, Eve UL; Huemer, Birgit UL

Scientific Conference (2015, July 31)

Multilingualism is a key feature of the identity and development strategy of the University of Luxembourg. This is reflected in its slogan: ‘University of Luxembourg. Multilingual, personalized ... [more ▼]

Multilingualism is a key feature of the identity and development strategy of the University of Luxembourg. This is reflected in its slogan: ‘University of Luxembourg. Multilingual, personalized, connected’. The University Language Centre was recently founded to support multilingual education and the growth of the university as a research institution. To establish the needs for language and communication support and inform language policy decisions, we conducted an extensive needs analysis among staff and students. This paper presents the findings of that investigation. The needs analysis consists of semi-structured interviews with study programme directors and online questionnaires for all staff and students. The interviews principally enquired after the following: language entry requirements for students and the means used to assess language skills; current language support provided in different study programmes; and the perceived need for academic, professional and general language support for staff and students. The online questionnaires collected data on students’ and staff’s self-assessed proficiency in the three main languages, and the perceived need for specific language and communication support across study programmes, disciplines and staff categories. The interviews with the programme directors revealed that language entry requirements vary greatly across study programmes and that applicants’ language skills have hitherto mainly been assessed in a non-standardised way. Interviewees mostly thought that for students academic writing support was paramount, while for their academic staff they did not usually feel any need for research- or teaching -related language support apart from proofreading. At the time of writing, the student and staff questionnaires are being administered. However, in our presentation we will be able to present and compare the findings of all three parts of the needs analysis so that we can highlight the perceived needs for language and communication support at this multilingual university as well as how these relate to its language policy. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 161 (16 UL)
See detailMultilingualism in a multidisciplinary Perspective
Huemer, Birgit UL

Presentation (2015, March 24)

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (0 UL)