Browsing
     by title


0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

or enter first few letters:   
OK
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIs diversification of farm households still an option for integrated rural development? Evidences from Slovenia and Saarland, Germany
Nienaber, Birte UL; Potočnik Slavič, Irma

in Quaestiones Geographicae (2013), 32(4), 39-48

Multifunctionality of rural areas in Europe has become an important aspect of rural development in the last years. An important instrument to ameliorate the multifunctionality is diversification of farm ... [more ▼]

Multifunctionality of rural areas in Europe has become an important aspect of rural development in the last years. An important instrument to ameliorate the multifunctionality is diversification of farm income. As various forms of farm income diversification have been developed throughout Europe the paper will survey the effectiveness of undertaken measures. First the issue of farm diversification will be argued theoretically. Then case studies from Saarland, Germany and from Slovenia analyse the importance of diversification for rural areas. A comparison two regions will dissect the chances and risks of diversification in a comparable new and old EU member state. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 108 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIs Dysfunctional Use of the Mobile Phone a Behavioural Addiction? Confronting Symptom-Based Versus Process-Based Approaches.
Billieux, Joël UL; Philippot, Pierre; Schmid, Cecile et al

in Clinical psychology & psychotherapy (2015), 22(5), 460-8

UNLABELLED: Dysfunctional use of the mobile phone has often been conceptualized as a 'behavioural addiction' that shares most features with drug addictions. In the current article, we challenge the ... [more ▼]

UNLABELLED: Dysfunctional use of the mobile phone has often been conceptualized as a 'behavioural addiction' that shares most features with drug addictions. In the current article, we challenge the clinical utility of the addiction model as applied to mobile phone overuse. We describe the case of a woman who overuses her mobile phone from two distinct approaches: (1) a symptom-based categorical approach inspired from the addiction model of dysfunctional mobile phone use and (2) a process-based approach resulting from an idiosyncratic clinical case conceptualization. In the case depicted here, the addiction model was shown to lead to standardized and non-relevant treatment, whereas the clinical case conceptualization allowed identification of specific psychological processes that can be targeted with specific, empirically based psychological interventions. This finding highlights that conceptualizing excessive behaviours (e.g., gambling and sex) within the addiction model can be a simplification of an individual's psychological functioning, offering only limited clinical relevance. KEY PRACTITIONER MESSAGE: The addiction model, applied to excessive behaviours (e.g., gambling, sex and Internet-related activities) may lead to non-relevant standardized treatments. Clinical case conceptualization allowed identification of specific psychological processes that can be targeted with specific empirically based psychological interventions. The biomedical model might lead to the simplification of an individual's psychological functioning with limited clinical relevance. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 123 (3 UL)
See detailIs Europe listening to Us? Successes and Failures of the European Citizen Consultation
Kies, Raphaël UL; Nanz, Patrizia

Book published by Ashgate/Roehampton University Press (2013)

How can the European Union engage and connect with the people it aims to represent? What initiatives and schemes have been used to engage EU citizens? To what extent can such procedures be considered a ... [more ▼]

How can the European Union engage and connect with the people it aims to represent? What initiatives and schemes have been used to engage EU citizens? To what extent can such procedures be considered a move forward towards a more participative and democratic Europe? This collection of internationally recognised specialists in European integration and innovative democratic practices seek to answer these key questions, explore European citizens’ thoughts and opinions about the EU and evaluate the governing elite’s attempts to engage with the public. It offers critical analysis of EU justifications and strategies for implementing Deliberative Citizens Involvement Projects and focuses on some of the major participative experiences trialled and implemented by EU institutions. By comparing these different attempts to increase and bolster the participation of EU citizens and evaluating their impact the book offers valuable and original material on the civic involvement of EU citizens and the legitimacy of the EU decision making process. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 117 (3 UL)
See detailIs European CBC policy creating cohesion in the Serbia-Croatia borderland?
Blondel, Cyril UL

Scientific Conference (2012, March 15)

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (0 UL)
Full Text
See detailIs Gender in the Eye of the Beholder? Identifying Cultural Attitudes with Art Auction Prices
Penasse, Julien UL; Ren´ee, Adams; Roman, Kr¨aussl et al

Speeches/Talks (2018)

Detailed reference viewed: 32 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIs gender in the eye of the beholder? Identifying cultural attitudes with art auction prices
Kräussl, Roman UL; Adams, Renée; Navone, Marco et al

E-print/Working paper (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 176 (3 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIs income equality also better for your cognitive health? A multilevel analysis on trajectories of cognitive function at older ages
Leist, Anja UL; Chauvel, Louis UL

in PAA website (2016)

This paper contributes to research on contextual associations with older-age cognitive function by investigating to which extent country-level income inequality is associated with older-age cognitive ... [more ▼]

This paper contributes to research on contextual associations with older-age cognitive function by investigating to which extent country-level income inequality is associated with older-age cognitive function and decline. Data came from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE), providing information on cognitive function (fluency, immediate and delayed recall) of respondents aged 50-80 years coming from a total of 16 European countries that participated in at least two waves of SHARE. A total of 44,303 observations were available at first and second measurement, 13,509 observations at third measurement, and 9,736 observations at fourth measurement. Three-level hierarchical models (measurements nested within individuals nested within countries) were run, showing that income inequality was negatively associated with cognitive level but not with decline. The findings suggest that income inequality is not associated with cognitive trajectories. Mechanisms of maintaining cognitive function at older ages may not be susceptible to country-level income inequalities. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 186 (5 UL)
Full Text
See detailIs less really more? Involving or not involving tumor patients in medical decisions: A patients’ perspective.
Hoffmann, Martine; Recchia, Sophie UL; Ferring, Dieter UL

in Psychology and Health (2011), 26 (2)

Is less really more? Involving or not involving tumour patients in medical decisions: A patients’ perspective Martine Hoffmann, Sophie Recchia and Dieter Ferring Throughout the western industrialised ... [more ▼]

Is less really more? Involving or not involving tumour patients in medical decisions: A patients’ perspective Martine Hoffmann, Sophie Recchia and Dieter Ferring Throughout the western industrialised countries, shared decision-making is gaining increasing attention in the area of health policy as well as in the field of oncology. However, little is known about the current practice in Siberia and its impact on patient outcomes so far. This study thus aimed at (a) exploring patients’ level of satisfaction with information giving and treatment involvement and (b) identifying key psychosocial and disease-related determinants interrelated with the decision-making process. The sample comprised 172 in-patients treated for different types of cancer. Cross-tap analyses showed that in 70% of the reported cases, medical decision-making was in line with patients’ wishes: thereof 40% of the respondents preferred a paternalistic style and 30% opted for a shared-decision-making approach. Of those patients who were dissatisfied with medical decision-making, 80% wished a higher degree of involvement. Implications of these findings for the development and use of decision support tools are discussed. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 71 (1 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailIs Life Satisfaction Contagious?
Catunda, Carolina UL; Heinz, Andreas UL; van Duin, Claire UL et al

Scientific Conference (2019, June)

Background: Life satisfaction (LS) is a major component of adolescents’ subjective well-being, facilitating adaptive development and influencing health. Literature shows that social support influences ... [more ▼]

Background: Life satisfaction (LS) is a major component of adolescents’ subjective well-being, facilitating adaptive development and influencing health. Literature shows that social support influences adolescents LS. In addition, the social network can affect health-related behaviors of adults - individuals that smoke or exercise tend to group together. However, the effects of others` LS on adolescents’ individual evaluation of LS (the contagion hypothesis) is still to be addressed. Objective(s): To test the contagion hypothesis of adolescents’ life satisfaction (how LS of proxies influences the individual LS appraisal). Method: Data is from 9738 students (aged 9-20) from the 2018 HBSC Luxembourg survey. A multilevel analysis was used to evaluate LS, with the school classes as subjects (model 1) to estimate the influence of being in a certain school class. Later, FAS, age and gender were entered as control variables (model 2). Results: The grand mean (intercept) for LS in model 1 was 7.57 (SE=.03, p<.001). For model 2, FAS (b=.47, SE=.03, p<.001), age (b=-.14, SE=.01, p<.001) and gender (b=-.23, SE=.04, p<.001) were significantly predictive of LS. The grand mean for LS, conditioned on the presence of FAS, age and gender, was 9.02 (SE=.05, p<.001). Interclass Correlation Coefficient decreased from model 1 (ICC=.08) to model 2 (ICC=.04). Conclusions: Results suggest that part of the variance of LS can be explained by the school class level. In other words, school class clusters have an influence on their LS, indicating that the LS of adolescents from a class partially accounts for individual LS. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 70 (7 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIs low fertility really a problem? Population aging, dependency, and consumption
Lee, Ronald; Mason, Andrew; Olivera Angulo, Javier UL et al

in Science (2014), 346(6206), 229-234

Longer lives and fertility far below the replacement level of 2.1 births per woman are leading to rapid population aging in many countries. Many observers are concerned that aging will adversely affect ... [more ▼]

Longer lives and fertility far below the replacement level of 2.1 births per woman are leading to rapid population aging in many countries. Many observers are concerned that aging will adversely affect public finances and standards of living. Analysis of newly available National Transfer Accounts data for 40 countries shows that fertility well above replacement would typically be most beneficial for government budgets. However, fertility near replacement would be most beneficial for standards of living when the analysis includes the effects of age structure on families as well as governments. And fertility below replacement would maximize per capita consumption when the cost of providing capital for a growing labor force is taken into account. Although low fertility will indeed challenge government programs and very low fertility undermines living standards, we find that moderately low fertility and population decline favor the broader material standard of living. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 178 (28 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIs medicine use for nervousness associated with adolescent at-risk or problem gambling ?
Canale, Natale; Vieno, Alessio; Billieux, Joël UL et al

in European Addiction Research (2017), 23(4), 171-176

Objective: To examine the association between adolescent at-risk or problem gambling (ARPG) and medicine used to treat nervousness in a large-scale nationally representative sample of Italian adolescents ... [more ▼]

Objective: To examine the association between adolescent at-risk or problem gambling (ARPG) and medicine used to treat nervousness in a large-scale nationally representative sample of Italian adolescents. Study design: Data from the 2013 to 2014 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children Survey was used for cross-sectional analyses (a sample of 20,791 15-year-old students). Self-administered questionnaires were completed by a representative sample of high-school students. Respondents’ ARPG, use of medicine for nervousness and potential confounding factors were assessed. Multilevel logistic regression analyses were used to test the association between medicine use to treat nervousness and ARPG. Results: The overall prevalence of adolescents reporting medicine use for nervousness in the last month was 6.3%. The odds of ARPG were 3 times higher among adolescents who used medicine for nervousness compared to that among adolescents who did not take such medicine (OR 2.96, 95% CI 2.07–4.25). Importantly, the association between medicine used to treat nervousness and ARPG did not vary significantly when viewed in light of psychological symptoms. Conclusions: Medicine use to treat nervousness is associated with increased risk of gambling-related harm. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 111 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIs Pedophilic Sexual Preference Continuous? A Taxometric Analysis Based on Direct and Indirect Measures
Schmidt, Alexander F. UL; Mokros, Andreas; Banse, Rainer

in PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT (2013), 25(4), 1146-1153

The present study addressed the question of whether deviant sexual preferences for children can be considered a taxon, utilizing data from a multimethod assessment battery. The test battery comprised ... [more ▼]

The present study addressed the question of whether deviant sexual preferences for children can be considered a taxon, utilizing data from a multimethod assessment battery. The test battery comprised direct self-report as well as indirect latency-based measures (Implicit Association Tests, viewing time) of deviant sexual preferences for children. In a mixed sample of adult men (N = 304, including sex offenders against children, sex offenders against adults, and controls who were either nonsexual offenders or nonoffenders), 27% of the offenders convicted for child sexual abuse or child pornography charges were identified as a homogeneous and distinct latent class. Additional taxometric analyses corroborated the notion of a pedophilic subgroup. Individuals in this pedophilic group showed elevated scores on measures of deviant sexual preference for children over adults. The offense histories of the individuals from the pedophilic cluster indicated an increased likelihood of pedophilic preference as assessed by a file-based summary index. We interpret the results as evidence for pedophilic sexual preference as a distinct and taxonic clinical construct. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 113 (1 UL)
Full Text
See detailIs Risk-Neutral Skewness an Indicator of Jump Risk? Evidence from Tail Risk-Taking of Hedge Funds
Lehnert, Thorsten UL

E-print/Working paper (2020)

Research suggests that systematic tail risk affects the cross-sectional variation in hedge fund returns. Fund’s tail risk is mainly induced by its investments in more tail-sensitive stocks and is ... [more ▼]

Research suggests that systematic tail risk affects the cross-sectional variation in hedge fund returns. Fund’s tail risk is mainly induced by its investments in more tail-sensitive stocks and is positively related to a trading strategy of writing out-of-the-money put options on the equity market index. Hence, high tail risk hedge funds are exposed to higher moments risks; they sell market volatility risk and buy market skewness risk. The relationship between the return spread of a high minus low tail risk strategy and a market volatility factor is expected to be negative and empirically observed to be negative. However, the relationship between a tail risk strategy and a market skewness factor is expected to be positive but I find it to be negative. In this paper, I explore this puzzling result. Using equity-oriented hedge fund return data, I find that equity market skewness risk explains a major part of variations in hedge funds’ tail risk. My results suggest that the observed negative relationship relates to the problem of price pressure associated with “crowded trades” of mutual funds. Given that retail investors are prone to herding, the directional trading of mutual funds is correlated, and their collective actions can generate short-term price pressure on aggregate stock prices (price ‘noise’). Short sellers systematically exploit these patterns not only in the equity lending market, but also in the options market by moving in the opposite direction. Hence, in times when investors shift their funds from bond to equity mutual funds, short selling in the options market, the non-fundamental demand for index put options, induces a negative relationship between risk-neutral market skewness and returns. Accordingly, the long leg of the tail risk strategy appears to be negatively exposed to market skewness risk, which is in contrast to the usual interpretation of option-implied skewness as an indicator of jump risk. My results are in line with empirical evidence that suggests that the shape of the implied volatility curve is attributable to the demand pressure of specific option series and a limited ability of arbitrageurs to bring prices back into alignment. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 47 (1 UL)