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See detailHow patients perceive the therapeutic communications skills of their general practitioners, and how that perception affects adherence: use of the TCom-skill GP scale in a specific geographical area
Baumann, Michèle UL; Baumann, Cédric; Le Bihan, Etienne UL et al

in BMC Health Services Research (2008), 8

To study: (1) the structure and test-retest reliability of a measure of how patients perceive the therapeutic communications skills of their general practitioners (TCom-skill GP), and (2) the associations ... [more ▼]

To study: (1) the structure and test-retest reliability of a measure of how patients perceive the therapeutic communications skills of their general practitioners (TCom-skill GP), and (2) the associations of that scale with socio-demographic and health-related characteristics, and adherence. Methods: A total of 393 people who lived in the same geographic area and invited to attend a preventive medical centre for a check up were asked to complete a self-administered questionnaire concerning TCom-skill GP (15 items), socio-demographic and health-related characteristics, and to answer two questions on perceived adherence. Results: The average age of respondents was 46.8 years (SD 14), and 50.4% were men. The TCom-skill GP score was one-dimensional, had high internal coherence (Cronbach α 0.92), and good test-retest reliability (intra-class correlation coefficient 0.74). The overall score was positively related to increasing age. Respondents aged 60+ were more likely to be adherent. The higher the score, the higher the probability of adherence. Multivariate analysis showed that the TCom-skill score was associated with advancing age and the number of consultations with the GP during the previous 3 months, but not with gender, living alone, being employed, job category or educational level. Multivariate analysis also showed that adherence was associated with TCom-skill GP score which concealed the association between adherence and advancing age observed in univariate analysis. Conclusion: The TCom-skill GP scale probably has value in assessing the quality of doctor-patient relationships and therapeutic communications. The psychometric properties of the TCom-skill GP scale were appropriate for its use in this context. Adherence related to the TCom-skill GP and the latter related to the age of patients and the number of their previous consultations. The TCom-skill GP scale may be a useful way to assess, in a specific geographical location, the impact of medical professional training on therapeutic communication. [less ▲]

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See detailHow Performing PCA and CFA on the Same Data Equals Trouble
Fokkema, Marjolein; Greiff, Samuel UL

in European Journal of Psychological Assessment (2017), 33(6), 399-402

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See detailHow Quantitative Methods of Data Analysis Can Contribute to Historical Analysis: The Example of the Stapfer Inquiry
Hadjar, Andreas UL; Ruloff, Michael; Boser, Lukas et al

in International Journal for the Historiography of Education (Bildungsgeschichte) (2016), 6(1), 11-26

In 1799, the Ministry of Education led by Philipp Albert Stapfer gathered data on a large variety of issues concerning the education system in the Helvetic Republic. The main objective of this paper is to ... [more ▼]

In 1799, the Ministry of Education led by Philipp Albert Stapfer gathered data on a large variety of issues concerning the education system in the Helvetic Republic. The main objective of this paper is to demonstrate how the Stapfer inquiry as a historical data source can be analyzed employing techniques of quantitative data analysis. Two research questions were considered: How did school fees and distance to school impact school attendance at the time? Before presenting analyses and results, strengths and limitations of the Stapfer inquiry from the historical and the social science perspective are discussed followed by a conceptual elaboration of the research issues. The database for our analysis is a sample drawn from the Stapfer inquiry that consists of 104 schools. Results show that whereas the existence of school fees does not seem to have had an impact, the distance to school had a negative impact on school attendance. [less ▲]

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See detailHow Relevant is an Expert Evaluation of User Experience based on a Psychological Needs-Driven Approach?
Lallemand, Carine UL; Koenig, Vincent UL; Gronier, Guillaume

in Proceedings of the 8th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction (NordiCHI 2014) (2014)

Many methods and tools have been proposed to assess the User Experience (UX) of interactive systems. However, while researchers have empirically studied the relevance and validity of several UX evaluation ... [more ▼]

Many methods and tools have been proposed to assess the User Experience (UX) of interactive systems. However, while researchers have empirically studied the relevance and validity of several UX evaluation methods, few studies only have explored expert-based evaluation methods for the assessment of UX. If experts are able to assess something as complex and inherently subjective as UX, how they conduct such an evaluation and what criteria they rely on, thus remain open questions. In the present paper we report on 33 UX experts performing a UX evaluation on 4 interactive systems. We provided the experts with UX Cards, a tool based on a psychological-needs driven approach, developed to support UX Design and Evaluation. Results are encouraging and show that UX experts encountered no major issues to conduct a UX evaluation. However, significant differences exist between individual elements that experts have reported on and the overall assessment they made of the systems. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 166 (16 UL)
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See detailHow reliable are centrality measures for data collected from fragmentary and heterogeneous historical sources? A case study.
During, Marten UL

in Brughmans, Tom; Collar, Anna; Coward, Fiona (Eds.) The Connected Past. Challenges to Network Studies in Archaeology and History (2016)

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See detailHow representative are EAP listening books of real lectures?
Deroey, Katrien UL

Scientific Conference (2015, April 17)

Lecture listening and note-taking classes are a common component of EAP programmes and the list of listening course books is accordingly long. In deciding which of these to use, a key consideration is ... [more ▼]

Lecture listening and note-taking classes are a common component of EAP programmes and the list of listening course books is accordingly long. In deciding which of these to use, a key consideration is arguably whether it prepares students for lectures. In this regard, the availability of spoken academic corpora (e.g. BASE, MICASE, ELFA) and the research arising from these provides insights into lecture discourse that could be usefully integrated in such materials. However, as I will here show, the integration of corpus findings in EAP course books is surprisingly limited, raising the question of whether training based on such materials forms an adequate preparation for the demands of real lectures. I illustrate the gap between authentic lecture discourse and various current listening books by comparing the treatment of importance markers (e.g. the important point is; remember; I want to emphasize this) with their realisation in a lecture corpus. (Deroey and Taverniers 2012; Deroey 2013). Since these discourse organisational signals alert students to key points, being able to identify these markers may facilitate lecture comprehension and note-taking. Importance markers were retrieved from all 160 lectures of the British Academic Spoken English corpus using corpus-driven and corpus-based methods. The investigation revealed that while listening books typically highlight the importance of identifying the lecturer’s main points, students are either not or inadequately trained to recognise importance markers. Where examples of such markers are included, they are few and prototypical (e.g. the important point is). However, in the lecture corpus prototypical markers are relatively uncommon; instead less explicit, multifunctional markers such as ‘the thing is’ and ‘remember’ predominate. The findings suggest that much remains to be done to make lecture listening books more representative of real lectures. References Deroey, K. L. B. and Taverniers, M. 2012. “‘Just remember this’: Lexicogrammatical relevance markers in lectures”. English for Specific Purposes 31 (4): 221-233. Deroey, K. L. B. (2015). Marking importance in lectures: Interactive and textual orientation. Applied Linguistics, 36(1), 51-72. [less ▲]

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See detailHow representative are EAP listening books of real lectures?
Deroey, Katrien UL

in Kemp, Jenny (Ed.) Proceedings of the 2015 BALEAP Conference. EAP in a rapidly changing landscape: Issues, challenges and solutions (2017)

Lecture listening and note-taking classes are a common component of EAP programmes and the list of listening course books is accordingly long. In deciding which of these to use, a key consideration is ... [more ▼]

Lecture listening and note-taking classes are a common component of EAP programmes and the list of listening course books is accordingly long. In deciding which of these to use, a key consideration is arguably whether it prepares students for lectures. In this regard, the availability of spoken academic corpora (e.g. BASE, MICASE, ELFA) and the research arising from these provides insights into lecture discourse that could be usefully integrated in such materials. However, as I will here show, the integration of corpus findings in EAP course books is surprisingly limited, raising the question of whether training based on such materials forms an adequate preparation for the demands of real lectures. I illustrate the gap between authentic lecture discourse and various current listening books by comparing the treatment of importance markers (e.g. the important point is; remember; I want to emphasize this) with their realisation in a lecture corpus. (Deroey and Taverniers 2012; Deroey 2013). Since these discourse organisational signals alert students to key points, being able to identify these markers may facilitate lecture comprehension and note-taking. Importance markers were retrieved from all 160 lectures of the British Academic Spoken English corpus using corpus-driven and corpus-based methods. The investigation revealed that while listening books typically highlight the importance of identifying the lecturer’s main points, students are either not or inadequately trained to recognise importance markers. Where examples of such markers are included, they are few and prototypical (e.g. the important point is). However, in the lecture corpus prototypical markers are relatively uncommon; instead less explicit, multifunctional markers such as ‘the thing is’ and ‘remember’ predominate. The findings suggest that much remains to be done to make lecture listening books more representative of real lectures. References Deroey, K. L. B. and Taverniers, M. 2012. “‘Just remember this’: Lexicogrammatical relevance markers in lectures”. English for Specific Purposes 31 (4): 221-233. Deroey, K. L. B. (2015). Marking importance in lectures: Interactive and textual orientation. Applied Linguistics, 36(1), 51-72. [less ▲]

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See detailHow representative are the online political forums? Analysis of the referendum campaign on national voting rights for foreigners
Kies, Raphaël UL

Presentation (2016, April)

A common assertion is that online forums are not representative of the general public opinion but would reflect the behaviour and opinions of frustrated and extremist citizens. The objective of this paper ... [more ▼]

A common assertion is that online forums are not representative of the general public opinion but would reflect the behaviour and opinions of frustrated and extremist citizens. The objective of this paper is to empirically test this assertion by looking at the online debates about the referendum on the question of whether resident foreigners should under certain conditions (that will be specified) be allowed to vote for the national elections in Luxembourg. In order to measure the opinions emerging from the online forums, the author has gathered the comments of a selection of the most read and active campaign forums (more than 50 comments) and has coded them to determine if they are in favour or against the extension of voting right to foreigners. The representativeness of the online forms is evaluated by comparing these results with, on the one hand, the referendum outcome and, on the other hand, the data of a representative post-referendum survey that compares the opinions of people who were active in the online forum with the ones of passive users (reader but no posting) and non-users. [less ▲]

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See detailHow resilient is Luxembourg's food system?
Reckinger, Rachel UL

Conference given outside the academic context (2020)

Detailed reference viewed: 67 (12 UL)
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See detailHow Road and Mobile Networks Correlate: Estimating Urban Traffic Using Handovers
Derrmann, Thierry; Frank, Raphaël UL; Viti, Francesco UL et al

in IEEE Transactions on Intelligent Transportation Systems (2019)

We propose a novel way of linking mobile network signaling data to the state of the underlying urban road network. We show how a predictive model of traffic flows can be created from mobile network ... [more ▼]

We propose a novel way of linking mobile network signaling data to the state of the underlying urban road network. We show how a predictive model of traffic flows can be created from mobile network signaling data. To achieve this, we estimate the vehicular density inside specific areas using a polynomial function of the inner and exiting mobile phone handovers performed by the base stations covering those areas. We can then use the aggregated handovers as flow proxies alongside the density proxy to directly estimate an average velocity within an area. We evaluate the model in a simulation study of Luxembourg city and generalize our findings using a real-world data set extracted from the LTE network of a Luxembourg operator. By predicting the real traffic states as measured through floating car data, we achieve a mean absolute percentage error of 11.12%. Furthermore, in our study case, the approximations of the network macroscopic fundamental diagrams (MFD) of road network partitions can be generated. The analyzed data exhibit low variance with respect to a quadratic concave flow-density function, which is inline with the previous theoretical results on MFDs and are similar when estimated from simulation and real data. These results indicate that mobile signaling data can potentially be used to approximate MFDs of the underlying road network and contribute to better estimate road traffic states in urban congested networks. [less ▲]

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See detailHow shared pre-start-up moments of transition and cognitions contextualize effectual and causal decisions in entrepreneurial teams
Tryba, Anne; Fletcher, Denise Elaine UL

in Small Business Economics (2019), 52(3), 1-24

Although it is reported that early venture decisions are influenced by the relationships and common history of entrepreneurial team members, little is known about how the mutual interests and ambitions ... [more ▼]

Although it is reported that early venture decisions are influenced by the relationships and common history of entrepreneurial team members, little is known about how the mutual interests and ambitions experienced in the pre-start-up phase provide a shared and relational context for joint decisions. Drawing on a multiple case study approach of nine entrepreneurial teams in new ventures, this study identifies the shared pre-start-up moments of transition during which team members’ prior work and life patterns start to change. We show that in these intense moments, shared entrepreneurial cognition evolves among team members – the relationality of which provides a unique social context for decision behaviors. Our findings conclude that effectual behaviors advance a theory of context because in simultaneously working with effectual and causal logics (albeit with varying intensities), team decisions are realized that are consistent with the relational context that emerges in the pre-start-up moment. [less ▲]

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See detailHow should entrepreneurial teams behave to achieve firm growth?
Tryba, Anne UL; Breugst, Nicola

Scientific Conference (2018, June)

Detailed reference viewed: 82 (2 UL)
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See detailHow should rural policy be evaluated if it aims to foster community involvement in environmental management?
Prager, Katrin; Nienaber, Birte UL; Neumann, Barbara et al

in Journal of Rural Studies (2015), 37

This paper brings together different theoretical perspectives to propose an evaluation framework for policies which have the explicit aim to foster community involvement in the management of their natural ... [more ▼]

This paper brings together different theoretical perspectives to propose an evaluation framework for policies which have the explicit aim to foster community involvement in the management of their natural environment in the context of sustainable rural development, such as the EU LEADER programme, Australia's Caring for Our Country, and UNESCO Biosphere Reserves. Previous policy evaluations have over-simplified the complex social-ecological systems on which these policies are supposed to act, have lacked specification of the policy level they address and were predicated on the assumption that policies can be designed to produce predictable outcomes.Based on a concept of 'complex realities' we developed a framework to guide the evaluation of policy effectiveness in socialecological systems. This comprehensive framework provides the conceptual and theoretical context in which individual evaluation exercises for policy review and future programme design can be embedded. It goes beyond existing frameworks by allowing the identification of factors that explain how and why a policy tool was effective. It provides a structure within which data sets from different sources, relevant stakeholders and relationships can be identified and analysed in a multi-level and multi-scale context. However, we emphasise that policy makers and evaluators' mindsets would have to change to accept uncertainty and the validity of various stakeholders' perceptions and evaluations. [less ▲]

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See detailHow Social Support and Self-Efficacy Moderate Effects of Significant Life Events on School Drop-Out
Burger, Kaspar; Samuel, Robin UL

Scientific Conference (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (0 UL)
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See detailHow Social Support and Self-Efficacy Moderate Effects of Significant Life Events on School Drop-Out in Young People
Burger, Kaspar; Samuel, Robin UL

Scientific Conference (2017)

Drivers of drop-out have been studied extensively over the past years. A number of studies suggest that self-efficacy and social support help reduce adverse effects of significant life events, such as ... [more ▼]

Drivers of drop-out have been studied extensively over the past years. A number of studies suggest that self-efficacy and social support help reduce adverse effects of significant life events, such as trouble with family and friends, on drop-out intention but also on actual drop- out. However, over-all, evidence as to whether self-efficacy and social support influence drop-out intention and actual drop-out is mixed. We examined whether, and to what extent, perceived social support and general self-efficacy affect drop-out of adolescents in transition to young adulthood. We distinguished between baseline levels of social support and self-efficacy and (within-person) change in social support and self-efficacy in order to determine whether drop-out is sensitive to fluctuations in social support and self-efficacy when person-specific levels of social support and self-efficacy are taken into account. Estimating growth curve models on TREE data, a panel study on the life trajectories of compulsory-school leavers in Switzerland, we found that baseline levels of social support and self-efficacy, as well as within-person change in social support and self-efficacy, affected adolescents’ drop-out intention, but did not prevent actual drop-out. Moreover, our models show effects of a range of significant life events on drop-out intention and actual drop-out. These findings improve our understanding of the role that psychological and social factors play in shaping drop-out intentions and actual drop-out [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 144 (1 UL)
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See detailHow Some Bankers Made a Million by Trading Just Two Securities?
Rinne, Kalle UL; Suominen, Matti UL

Scientific Conference (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 91 (2 UL)
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See detailHow some bankers made a million by trading just two securities?
Rinne, Kalle UL; Suominen, Matti UL

in Journal of Empirical Finance (in press)

We study a pair trading strategy that utilizes short-term return reversals in the stock market. Using U.S. data, we show that returns to our pair trading strategy exceed reasonable estimates for ... [more ▼]

We study a pair trading strategy that utilizes short-term return reversals in the stock market. Using U.S. data, we show that returns to our pair trading strategy exceed reasonable estimates for transaction costs. The strategy also generates positive alpha when controlling for the standard risk factors. Second, using transaction level data from Finland, focusing on a popular pair, we provide evidence that these kinds of pair trading returns are compensation from providing liquidity. On the days when the expected returns to our pair trading strategy are the highest, the trading volume is abnormally high and, judging from active brokers’ net trades, nearly 45% of all brokers (or their customers) engage in pair trading in accordance with our trading strategy. These brokers are mainly counterparties to few brokers that trade large quantities of stocks inconsistent with our strategy. [less ▲]

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See detailHow Some Bankers Made a Million by Trading just Two Securities?
Rinne, Kalle UL; Suominen, Matti

Scientific Conference (2016, June)

Detailed reference viewed: 79 (0 UL)
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See detailHow the concept of generation can help us to understand children`s everyday lives?
Müller, Fernanda; Ramos, Anne Carolina UL

Scientific Conference (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (0 UL)