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See detailHow to reveal the secrets of an obscure white-box implementation
Goubin, Louis; Paillier, Pascal; Rivain, Matthieu UL et al

in Journal of Cryptographic Engineering (2019), 10(1), 49--66

White-box cryptography protects key extraction from software implementations of cryptographic primitives. It is widely deployed in DRM and mobile payment applications in which a malicious attacker might ... [more ▼]

White-box cryptography protects key extraction from software implementations of cryptographic primitives. It is widely deployed in DRM and mobile payment applications in which a malicious attacker might control the entire execution environment. So far, no provably secure white- box implementation of AES has been put forward, and all the published practical constructions are vulnerable to differential computation analysis (DCA) and differential fault analysis (DFA). As a consequence, the industry relies on home-made obscure white-box implementations based on secret designs. It is therefore of interest to investigate the achievable resistance of an AES implementation to thwart a white-box adversary in this paradigm. To this purpose, the ECRYPT CSA project has organized the WhibOx contest as the catch the flag challenge of CHES 2017. Researchers and engineers were invited to participate either as designers by submitting the source code of an AES-128 white-box implementation with a freely chosen key, or as breakers by trying to extract the hard-coded keys in the submitted challenges. The participants were not expected to disclose their identities or the underlying designing/attacking techniques. In the end, 94 submitted challenges were all broken and only 13 of them held more than 1 day. The strongest (in terms of surviving time) implementation, submitted by Biryukov and Udovenko, survived for 28 days (which is more than twice as much as the second strongest implementation), and it was broken by a single team, i.e., the authors of the present paper, with reverse engineering and algebraic analysis. In this paper, we give a detailed description of the different steps of our cryptanalysis. We then generalize it to an attack methodology to break further obscure white-box implementations. In particular, we formalize and generalize the linear decoding analysis that we use to extract the key from the encoded intermediate variables of the target challenge. [less ▲]

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See detailHow to revise a total preorder
Booth, Richard UL; Meyer, Thomas

in Journal of Philosophical Logic (2011), 40

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See detailHow to threaten male gamers: The effects of stereotype threat on video game performance
Wagener, Gary L.; Melzer, André UL

Poster (2018, May)

A total of 70 participants (47.1% men) took part in a lab experiment that manipulated stereotype threat (i.e., the risk of confirming a negative stereotype about one’s group) between playing a video game ... [more ▼]

A total of 70 participants (47.1% men) took part in a lab experiment that manipulated stereotype threat (i.e., the risk of confirming a negative stereotype about one’s group) between playing a video game (Bejeweled 3). Participants performed generally worse after reading a fictitious article on gaming research that women would still play less and perform worse in games than men (ST condition). In contrast to males, however, female participants reported greater frustration from reading this article than their colleagues who read that women and men no longer differ in terms of playing frequency and performance skills (no ST condition). Interestingly, a reverse pattern of results was obtained for male participants, who reported a stronger negative effect of the article in the no ST condition on their ability to show their best gaming performance. Apparently, stereotype threat may affect video game performance both for women and men, but for different reasons. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 329 (12 UL)
See detailHow to use pragmatism pragmatically: Suggestions for the 21st century
Biesta, Gert UL

in Rud, A. G.; Garrison, J.; Stone, L. (Eds.) John Dewey at 150. Reflections for a New Century. (2009)

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See detailHow to use pragmatism pragmatically: Suggestions for the 21st century.
Biesta, Gert UL

in Education and Culture: The Journal of the John Dewey Society (2009), 25(2), 34-45

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See detailHow to win the numerical battle against the finite buffer stochastic fluid flow model
Fiedler, Markus; Voos, Holger UL

in Final report COST 257 (1999)

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See detailHow to work with honest but curious judges? (preliminary report)
Pang, Jun UL; Zhang, C.

in Proc. 7th International Workshop on Security Issues in Concurrency (2009)

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See detailHow to write if you cannot write: collaborative literacy in a Gambian village
Juffermans, Kasper UL

in van de Craats, Ineke; Kurvers, Jeanne (Eds.) Low-educated adult second language and literacy acquisition: Proceedings of the 4th symposium in Antwerp (2009)

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See detailHow unemployment scarring affects skilled young workers: evidence from a factorial survey of Swiss recruiters
Shi, Lulu P.; Imdorf, Christian; Samuel, Robin UL et al

in Journal for Labour Market Research = Zeitschrift für Arbeitsmarktforschung (2018), 52(7),

We ask how employers contribute to unemployment scarring in the recruitment process in the German-speaking part of Switzerland. By drawing on recruitment theories, we aim to better understand how ... [more ▼]

We ask how employers contribute to unemployment scarring in the recruitment process in the German-speaking part of Switzerland. By drawing on recruitment theories, we aim to better understand how recruiters assess different patterns of unemployment in a job candidate’s CV and how this affects the chances of young applicants being considered for a vacancy. We argue that in contexts with tight school-work linkage and highly standardised Vocational Education and Training (VET) systems, the detrimental effect of early unemployment depends on how well the applicant’s profile matches the requirements of the advertised position. To test this assumption, we surveyed Swiss recruiters who were seeking to fill positions during the time of data collection. We employed a factorial survey experiment that tested how the (un)employment trajectories in hypothetical young job applicants’ CVs affected their chances of being considered for a real vacancy. Our results show that unemployment decreases the perceived suitability of an applicant for a specific job, which implies there is a scarring effect of unemployment that increases with the duration of being unemployed. But we also found that these effects are moderated by how well the applicant’s profile matches the job’s requirements. Overall, the worse the match between applicant’s profile and the job profile, the smaller are the scarring effects of unemployment. In sum, our findings contribute to the literature by revealing considerable heterogeneity in the scarring effects of unemployment. Our findings further suggest that the scarring effects of unemployment need to be studied with regard to country-specific institutional settings, the applicants’ previous education and employment experiences, and the job characteristics. [less ▲]

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See detailHow universities can assess employability skills?
Pelt, Véronique UL; Baumann, Michèle UL

Presentation (2009)

The SQALES (Students' Quality of Life and Employability Skills) project aims to help universities adopt the recommendations from Bergen (Communiqué 2005) within the framework of the Bologna Process and ... [more ▼]

The SQALES (Students' Quality of Life and Employability Skills) project aims to help universities adopt the recommendations from Bergen (Communiqué 2005) within the framework of the Bologna Process and the European Higher Education Area (EHEA, Communiqué de Louvain & European Council, 2009). Under the European Council declaration of 1999, universities have become subject to assessment in terms of productivity and competitiveness. Against that background, we aim to help universities: Create a tool for assessing employability skills (ES) and addressing the requirements of the Bologna Process and the European Higher Education Area (EHEA, European Council, 2009) Create an evaluation device with which to establish benchmarks Facilitate a dialogue between all those involved in order to meet students’ needs Adopt new activities and make use of new resources Compare themselves with other European universities The objectives of Sqales are to: - Describe Employability skills, WHOQoL domains and socio-demographic characteristics Analyse the links between employability skills and other variables Identify students' feelings about their faculties using a range of scores [less ▲]

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See detailHow universities can assess employability skills?
Pelt, Véronique UL; Baumann, Michèle UL

in Bargel, T. et al. (Ed.) Empirical Evidence in International Comparison. (2010)

The SQALES (Students' Quality of Life and Employability Skills) project aims to help universities adopt the recommendations from Bergen (Communiqué 2005) within the framework of the Bologna Process and ... [more ▼]

The SQALES (Students' Quality of Life and Employability Skills) project aims to help universities adopt the recommendations from Bergen (Communiqué 2005) within the framework of the Bologna Process and the European Higher Education Area (EHEA, Communiqué Louvain & European Council, 2009). Under the European Council declaration of 1999, universities have become subject to assessment in terms of productivity and competitiveness. Against that background, we aim to help universities: Create a tool for assessing employability skills (ES) and addressing the requirements of the Bologna Process and the European Higher Education Area (EHEA, European Council, 2009) Create an evaluation device with which to establish benchmarks Facilitate a dialogue between all those involved in order to meet students’ needs Adopt new activities and make use of new resources Compare themselves with other European universities The objectives of Sqales are to: - Describe Employability skills, WHOQoL domains and socio-demographic characteristics Analyse the links between employability skills and other variables Identify students' feelings about their faculties using a range of scores [less ▲]

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See detailHow useful should the university be? On the rise of the global university and the crisis in higher education.
Biesta, Gert UL

in Qui Parle: Critical Humanities and Social Sciences (2011), 20(1), 35-47

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See detailHow Valuable are Patent Blocking Strategies?
Czarnitzki, Dirk; Hussinger, Katrin UL; Leten, Bart

in Review of Industrial Organization (2020)

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See detailHow valuable are Patent Blocking Strategies?
Czarnitzki, Dirk; Hussinger, Katrin UL; Leten, Bart

Scientific Conference (2013)

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See detailHow Welfare-State Regimes Shape Subjective Well-Being Across Europe
Samuel, Robin UL; Hadjar, Andreas UL

in Social Indicators Research (2016), 129(2), 565-587

Welfare-state regimes achieve different outcomes in dealing with social inequalities. For example, the social democratic or Scandinavian welfare-state regime is often considered as the most egalitarian ... [more ▼]

Welfare-state regimes achieve different outcomes in dealing with social inequalities. For example, the social democratic or Scandinavian welfare-state regime is often considered as the most egalitarian with a high social transfer rate and a comparably low level of income inequality. While most research on welfare-state regimes focuses on objective indicators of quality of life and inequalities, we are interested in how citizens actually evaluate their lives, using subjective well-being (SWB) as an indicator. The paper deals with two research questions: (1) How does the welfare-state regime affect subjective well-being, and (2) does the welfare-state regime influence the effect of status on SWB? Status is an essential first-order goal to produce subjective well-being according to the social production theory of Lindenberg and colleagues (Ormel et al. 1999), but is also linked to many other instrumental goals such as comfort and stimulation. The study carries out a multilevel analysis using pooled European Social Survey data from the years 2002–2012, covering more than 30 European countries. While we first look at how status drives SWB levels in different welfare-state regimes as classified by Esping-Andersen 1990, 1999), our focus is mainly on cross-level interactions between welfare-state regime type and the relationship between status and SWB. Our results provide evidence that social-democratic welfare-state regimes not only provide for living standards that are associated with the highest SWB levels, but also compensate best for status differences in SWB compared to other welfare-state regimes. [less ▲]

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See detailHow well can the combination of hlSST and SLR replace GRACE? A discussion from the point of view of applications
Weigelt, Matthias UL; van Dam, Tonie UL; Baur, Oliver et al

Scientific Conference (2014, September 30)

Detailed reference viewed: 166 (3 UL)
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See detailHow well does ‚general language proficiency’ explain language test performance?
Reichert, Monique UL; Brunner, Martin UL; Martin, Romain UL

Scientific Conference (2013, August 28)

The current research addresses the seemingly contradiction between the multiple findings of C-tests loading on a single general language proficiency (GLP) factor on the one hand, and the assumption that ... [more ▼]

The current research addresses the seemingly contradiction between the multiple findings of C-tests loading on a single general language proficiency (GLP) factor on the one hand, and the assumption that language proficiency as considered by language testing researchers is multi-dimensional. Research on the structure of language proficiency and in psycholinguistics suggests that GLP may best be represented as the common core across diverse language measures. In the present research, it is hypothesized that C-tests are excellent measures of this common core. In contrast, other language measures, beyond putting demands on GLP, are assumed to tap unique processes, explaining why multi-dimensionality often best reflects the structure of language measures. The current research addresses this hypothesis by examining structural equation models that evaluate alternative assumptions about the dimensionality of language proficiency. 222 students from the highest academic school track in Luxembourg completed a French C-test, as well as the Test de Connaissance du Français (TCF), encompassing measures of reading, listening, speaking and writing. The results show that the four TCF measures put extra demands on unique processes, whereas the C-test measured GLP only. The findings point out that the C-test should not be expected to replace measures of the four basic language skills, i.e., of reading and listening comprehension, or of written and spoken production, when a clear diagnostic of language proficiency in one of those domains is needed. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 60 (0 UL)