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See detailHorizontally Oscillating Hydrofoil-River-Turbine with Variable Immersion Depth
Norta, David Peter Benjamin UL; Sachau, Jürgen UL; Hans-Josef, Allelein

Scientific Conference (2014, May 22)

Motivated by the unused hydrokinetic potential of smaller European rivers and creeks we develop a horizontally oscillating hydrofoil turbine to exploit those resources. Based on the work of T. Kinsey and ... [more ▼]

Motivated by the unused hydrokinetic potential of smaller European rivers and creeks we develop a horizontally oscillating hydrofoil turbine to exploit those resources. Based on the work of T. Kinsey and Prof. G. Dumas of the Laval University, Canada, on vertically oscillating hydrofoils we adapt and improve the technology to the resources especially given in the country of Luxembourg in inner Europe. Currently, the energy of rivers is mainly harnessed and transformed in electricity by the well-known barrage type of hydropower plants. This type of hydropower plant becomes harder to implement, since the protection of the natural river flow and the protection of fishes and other animals becomes more important in Europe (see also Recovery of the European Eel Stock). The passage through an ordinary barrage turbine can lead to “very high mortality, notably on migrating silver eels”. Therefore other technologies have to be used to harness the still available rivers energy, namely hydrokinetic turbines. The field of hydrokinetic river turbines is in the beginning to evolve and first projects were implemented in the United States and Europe, harnessing large rivers and tidal currents. But there are fewer approaches available for smaller rivers with varying flow conditions, since the current propeller based concepts need a certain river depths and speed to generate electricity. Furthermore, it could be useful to implement controllable turbines, so that they serve the consumers need but do not lead to peaks in an energy systems balance, which have to be damped with other technologies, for example storages or throttle processes in thermal power plants. The hydrokinetic turbine, presented in this paper is fully controllable; its angle of incidence and its oscillation frequency can be controlled. The advantage of the full control of the motion of the moving hydrofoil is an improved efficiency of the power extraction from the seasonal but also daily varying flow conditions of smaller creeks. Furthermore we can answer with a varying power output to the altering consumers need. We can generate the power needed, once the dependence between oscillation frequencies, variation of the angle of incidence and the power output is derived. Operating the system, fixed to a raft, hold at a position floating on a river, we can also answer to the varying depth of the hydro resource. A simple mechanism can vary the immersion depth of the hydrofoil and adapt the harnessed flow cross-section to the current river conditions. This mechanism enables the new turbine concept to harness currently not useable hydro resources, which were limited by their minimum water depth. Furthermore the system can be protected from dangerous flood conditions with this lifting and lowering mechanism. We expect that we can contribute with this horizontally oscillating hydrofoil-river turbine to a higher share of hydropower generation in the field of micro generation. We are aiming on a concept which is modular (consisting of low kW range single modules) and can be adapted to the rivers size and the consumers’ needs. We will present the specifications of our idea which is currently on the way to be setup in our lab, to prove the controllability and want to present the physical restrictions and potentials for several flow conditions. [less ▲]

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See detailHormonal induction of an immediate-early gene response in myogenic cell lines--a paradigm for heart growth.
Maass, A.; Grohe, C.; Kubisch, C. et al

in European heart journal (1995), 16 Suppl C

Cardiac hypertrophy is characterized by growth of myocardial cells without proliferation. Many endo- paracrine stimuli such as angiotensin II, endothelin, alpha 1-adrenergic agonists, and insulin have ... [more ▼]

Cardiac hypertrophy is characterized by growth of myocardial cells without proliferation. Many endo- paracrine stimuli such as angiotensin II, endothelin, alpha 1-adrenergic agonists, and insulin have been shown to be able to induce cardiac hypertrophy either in vivo or in vitro. We have used the myoblast model of differentiation and proliferation to determine nuclear signal transduction mechanisms in muscle and (by analogy) cardiac growth. The first nuclear event known to occur when a growth stimulus acts upon a cell is induction of a family of immediate-early genes. Our group focused on the role of one of these genes, the early growth response gene-1 (Egr-1). We have shown that this gene is induced in isolated adult cardiac myocytes in the presence of endothelin. An anti-sense oligonucleotide complementary to the first six codons of the Egr-1 mRNA abolishes the stimulation of protein synthesis induced by endothelin. In the present study we further characterized paracrine growth stimuli in the myogenic cell line Sol8, which was used as a paradigm to further investigate mechanisms of paracrine growth induction. We demonstrated that a variety of candidate endo- paracrine stimuli for the induction of cardiac hypertrophy induced the Egr-1 messenger RNA in the myogenic cell line Sol8. Among these are endothelin, insulin, basic fibroblast growth factor, and platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF BB). We conclude: (1) In analogy to the myocardium, these growth factors act upon myoblasts. (2) This line appears to be a suitable model for the molecular characterization of Egr-1 target genes. [less ▲]

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See detailHorn Belief Change: A Contraction Core
Booth, Richard UL; Meyer, Thomas; Varzinczak, Ivan José et al

in Proceedings of the 19th European Conference on Artificial Intelligence (ECAI 2010) (2010)

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See detailHörspiel: Glanz und Elend der Kunstkopf-Stereophonie
Krebs, Stefan UL

Diverse speeches and writings (2017)

Detailed reference viewed: 54 (11 UL)
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See detailHospice. Lieux et expériences de vieillesses. Bruxelles 1830-1914
Richelle, Sophie Marthe UL

Doctoral thesis (2017)

History of old age and experiences of ageing poeple in those places in Brussels between 1830 and 1914

Detailed reference viewed: 77 (10 UL)
See detailEin Hospital für die Armen. 700 Jahre Hospice civil in der Stadt Luxemburg
Pauly, Michel UL

Article for general public (2008)

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See detailDas Hospital im Stadtgrund: eine gräfliche Stiftung für Arme und Betuchte
Pauly, Michel UL

in Pauly, Michel (Ed.) De l'Hospice Saint-Jean à l'Hospice civil. 700 Jahre Hospitalgeschichte in der Stadt Luxemburg. (2009)

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See detailHospital practices for the implementation of patient partnership in a multi-national European region
Scholtes, Beatrice; Breinbauer, Mareike; Voyen, Madeline et al

in European Journal of Public Health (2020)

The extent to which patients are involved in their care can be influenced by hospital policies and interventions. Nevertheless, the implementation of patient participation and involvement (PPI) at the ... [more ▼]

The extent to which patients are involved in their care can be influenced by hospital policies and interventions. Nevertheless, the implementation of patient participation and involvement (PPI) at the organisational (meso) level has rarely been assessed systematically. The aim of this study was to assess the occurrence of PPI practises in hospitals in Belgium, France, Germany and Luxembourg and to analyze if, and to what extent, the hospital vision and the presence of a patient committee influence the implementation of PPI practises. Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out using an online questionnaire in hospitals in the border regions of the four countries. The data were analyzed for differences between regions and the maturity of PPI development. Results: Full responses were obtained from 64 hospitals. A wide range of practices were observed, the degree of maturity was mixed. A majority of hospitals promoted patient partnership in the hospital's philosophy of care statement. However, the implementation of specific interventions for PPI was not found uniformly and differences could be observed between the countries. Conclusions: Hospitals in the region seem to be motivated to include patients more fully, however, implementation of PPI interventions seems incomplete and only partially integrated into the general functioning of the hospitals. The implementation of the concept seems to be more mature in the francophone part of the region perhaps due, in part, to a more favourable political context. [less ▲]

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See detailHospitäler im Grenzraum zwischen Germania und Romania
Pauly, Michel UL

in Scheutz, Martin; Sommerlechner, Andrea; Weigl, Herwig (Eds.) et al Quellen zur europäischen Spitalgeschichte in Mittelalter und Früher Neuzeit / Sources for the History of Hospitals in Medieval and Early Modern Europe (2010)

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See detailHospitäler im Mittelalter - wo und ab wann gehörte das Hospital zur Stadt?
Pauly, Michel UL

in Jäschke, Kurt-Ulrich; Schrenk, Christhard (Eds.) Was machte im Mittelalter zur Stadt? Selbstverständnis, Außensicht und Erscheinungsbilder mittelalterlicher Städte. Vorträge zum gleichnamigen Symposium vom 30. März bis 2. April 2006 in Heilbronn (2007)

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See detailHospitäler im Rheintal zwischen Elsass und Köln in räumlicher Perspektive
Pauly, Michel UL

in Rheinische Vierteljahrsblätter (2015), 79

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See detailHospitalisation
Powell, Rachael; Vögele, Claus UL; Johnston, Marie

in Llewellyn, C.D.; Ayers, S.; McManus, C. (Eds.) et al Cambridge Handbook of Psychology, Health and Medicine (2019)

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (2 UL)
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See detailHospitalisation and stressful medical procedures
Vögele, Claus UL

in Kaptein, A.; Weinman, J. (Eds.) Health Psychology (2004)

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See detailHostile Takeovers and Defensive Mechanisms in the UK and the US: A Case Against the United States Regime
Seretakis, Alexandros UL

in The Ohio State Entrepreneurial Business Law Journal (2013), 8(2),

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See detailThe Hour of Europe: Western Powers and the Breakup of Yugoslavia
Glaurdic, Josip UL

Book published by Yale University Press (2011)

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See detailHousehold credit and growth: International evidence
Leon, Florian UL

E-print/Working paper (2019)

This paper has two main objectives. First, it attempts to distinguish the effects of household and enterprise credit on economic growth for a large sample of developing and developed countries. Second, it ... [more ▼]

This paper has two main objectives. First, it attempts to distinguish the effects of household and enterprise credit on economic growth for a large sample of developing and developed countries. Second, it investigates the channels through which household credit affects economic growth. To do so, a new database covering 143 countries over the period 1995-2014 is employed. Econometric results show that household credit has a negative effect on growth, while business credit has a positive, albeit non significant, impact on growth. The literature provide two possible explanations to justify the negative effect of household credit. On the one hand, household credit expansion can induce more financial fragility. On the other hand, the negative impact of household credit could be explained by its effect on saving behaviors. Results provide some evidence indicating that the negative effect of household credit is more driven by the latter than the former. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 96 (0 UL)
See detailHousehold Nonemployment, Social Risks and Inequality in Europe
Hubl, Vanessa Julia UL

Doctoral thesis (2016)

The dissertation explores interactions between households, states and markets and their relation to socio-economic inequalities among working-age households. The focus lies on three aspects: the ... [more ▼]

The dissertation explores interactions between households, states and markets and their relation to socio-economic inequalities among working-age households. The focus lies on three aspects: the importance of the welfare state, economic risks and opportunities within households, and the link between these two aspects and broader patterns of inequality at the societal level. These are analysed in three empirical studies, using a range of statistical methods (multilevel analysis, event history models and counterfactual analyses of income distributions). In addition, an extensive framework paper provides a background to the analyses, clarifies their relation in theoretical terms, and discusses the results. The first empirical study explores the relation between the regulation of social benefits, social risks, and household nonemployment in 20 European countries using internationally comparative institutional and survey data. The study reveals that eligibility conditions and activation policy vary systematically with the effect of social risks on the probability of household nonemployment. The strength and direction of influence depends on the specific policy area and risk factor. The second study analyses the duration of household nonemployment for British and German couples from the early 1990s to the mid-2000s. Dual joblessness has become longer over time, which is related to changes in the household composition of nonemployed couples. The third analysis evaluates the consequences of welfare shifts between households on changing patterns of inequality between 2005 and 2010. Changes in the distribution of household employment, benefit transfers, and family types in Germany, the United Kingdom, Poland, and Spain are analysed in terms of their contribution to developments in income inequality between households. The analysis of income distributions suggests that changes in socio-demographic and economic household characteristics in a population can have a substantial impact on different income groups. The overarching conclusion of the dissertation is that certain aspects of household composition enhance the risk of lower economic activity and welfare but that the impact of these factors varies strongly according to the broader context the households are situated in. Social policies that have the potential to reduce inequalities between households need to consider possible adverse effects on economic risk structures and spill-over effects to other areas of social protection. Future research should continue studying the household’s role in relation to the market, the state, and individual needs and resources; incorporate additional economic and welfare regime aspects into the analyses; and explore further statistical tools to do so. [less ▲]

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See detailHousehold robots look and learn
Kröse, B.; Bunschoten, R.; ten Hagen, S. et al

in IEEE Robotics & Automation Magazine (2004), 11(4), 45-52

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See detailHousing land transaction data and structural econometric estimation of preference parameters for urban economic simulation models
Caruso, Geoffrey UL; Cavailhès, Jean; Peeters, Dominique et al

in Data in Brief (2015), 5

This paper describes a dataset of 6284 land transactions prices and plot surfaces in 3 medium-sized cities in France (Besançon, Dijon and Brest). The dataset includes road accessibility as obtained from a ... [more ▼]

This paper describes a dataset of 6284 land transactions prices and plot surfaces in 3 medium-sized cities in France (Besançon, Dijon and Brest). The dataset includes road accessibility as obtained from a minimization algorithm, and the amount of green space available to households in the neighborhood of the transactions, as evaluated from a land cover dataset. Further to the data presentation, the paper describes how these variables can be used to estimate the non-observable parameters of a residential choice function explicitly derived from a microeconomic model. The estimates are used by Caruso et al. (2015) to run a calibrated microeconomic urban growth simulation model where households are assumed to trade-off accessibility and local green space amenities. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 160 (7 UL)