Browsing
     by title


0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

or enter first few letters:   
OK
Full Text
See detailThe Future of Data-Driven Finance and RegTech
Zetzsche, Dirk Andreas UL; Buckley, Ross; Arner, Douglas et al

in Journal of Law and Policy (in press)

Detailed reference viewed: 100 (5 UL)
Full Text
See detailThe Future of Data-Driven Finance and RegTech: Lessons from EU Big Bang II
Zetzsche, Dirk Andreas UL; Arner, Douglas; Buckley, Ross et al

in Stanford J. of Law and Policy (2020)

Detailed reference viewed: 142 (0 UL)
See detailThe Future of Design Management Research
Gericke, Kilian UL

Presentation (2013, September 04)

Detailed reference viewed: 61 (0 UL)
See detailThe future of federalism - intergovernmental financial relations in an age of austerity
Sacher, Martin UL

in Regional & Federal Studies (2018), 28(1), 102-105

Detailed reference viewed: 105 (26 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe Future of GeoGebra
Kreis, Yves UL; Hohenwarter, Markus

Scientific Conference (2010, June 29)

The development team of GeoGebra is growing and very busy. Besides GeoGebra was selected to participate in the Google Summer of Code (GSoC) initiative where 5 students have been assigned to the ... [more ▼]

The development team of GeoGebra is growing and very busy. Besides GeoGebra was selected to participate in the Google Summer of Code (GSoC) initiative where 5 students have been assigned to the association. In our presentation we will show alpha and beta development ideas which might get included in a future GeoGebra version: GeoGebraCAS, GeoGebra3D, GeoGebraTouch, Layout Manager, Locus Line Equation, Implicit Plotting, ... [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 16 (0 UL)
Full Text
See detailThe Future of Living with AI
Schommer, Christoph UL

Speeches/Talks (2021)

This talk, which was part of a 2-hour panel and delivered as a 20-minute presentation without slides, came at the invitation of the Luxembourg Embassy in Brussels, Belgium. The speech is a statement and ... [more ▼]

This talk, which was part of a 2-hour panel and delivered as a 20-minute presentation without slides, came at the invitation of the Luxembourg Embassy in Brussels, Belgium. The speech is a statement and part of the International Symposium "The Future of Living", supported by EUNIC - EU National Institutes of Culture. The event was under the patronage of the Slovenian Presidency of the European Parliament. In the lecture, I briefly presented some selected ideas, observations, and examples on the symposium topic as well as my view of a future living together. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 81 (3 UL)
Full Text
See detailThe Future of Money in the Digital Age
Brand, Claus; Danescu, Elena UL

Scientific Conference (2020, October 09)

Research Seminar “The Future of Money in the Digital Age" (Blockchain and Cryptocurrencies. Digital Currencies vs Sovereign Currencies: Potential Implications for the Economic and Monetary Union.)

Detailed reference viewed: 92 (5 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe future of teacher education: Evidence, competence or wisdom?
Biesta, Gert UL

in Research on Steiner Education (2012), 3(1), 8-21

Detailed reference viewed: 416 (3 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFuture plans and the regulation of well-being of older Portuguese immigrants in Luxembourg
Albert, Isabelle UL; Barros Coimbra, Stephanie UL; Ferring, Dieter UL

in Social Inquiry into Well-Being (2016), 2(1), 70-78

Ageing and migration have become key issues in many European countries, as an unprecedented number of first generation immigrants are currently approaching retirement age. A permanent return to the ... [more ▼]

Ageing and migration have become key issues in many European countries, as an unprecedented number of first generation immigrants are currently approaching retirement age. A permanent return to the country of origin seems to be enacted more seldom after retirement than initially envisaged, a phenomenon referred to as “myth of return”. Instead, a third alternative seems to gain interest for ageing migrants, namely commuting between host country and country of origin. The present paper addresses future plans regarding preferred country of residence after retirement and the regulation of well-being of middle-aged and older first generation immigrants. The sample included N = 109 Portuguese first generation immigrants (49.5% female; average age: M = 55.35, SD = 7.42) who had been living in Luxembourg for about M = 30.69 (SD = 8.55) years. Analyses show that only one-fifth of participants plan to return to Portugal, whereas almost one-half prefer to stay in Luxembourg, one-quarter choose to commute, the remainder still being undecided. No differences in life-satisfaction were found, but those who plan to return used fewer self-regulatory strategies compared to those who want to stay or commute; in the STAY group, positive reappraisal strategies were related most strongly to their life-satisfaction, whereas for those who plan to commute both primary and secondary control were beneficial. Interestingly, lowering aspirations was positively related with life-satisfaction for those who plan to return to their country of origin after retirement. Results are discussed taking into consideration aspects of integration and migration experiences over the life-span. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 81 (8 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFuture Scenarios for the European Higher Education Area: Exploring the Possibilities of "Experimentalist Governance"
Harmsen, Robert UL

in Curaj, Adrian; Matei; Pricopie, Remus (Eds.) et al The European Higher Education Area: Between Critical Reflections and Future Policies, Part 2 (2015)

Detailed reference viewed: 125 (2 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFuture Scenarios for the European Higher Education Area: Exploring the Potential of 'Experimentalist Governance'
Harmsen, Robert UL

Scientific Conference (2014, November 25)

The launch of the European Higher Education Area (EHEA) in 2010 posed many of the central questions already asked of the Bologna Process (BP) with a renewed urgency, reflecting a growing sense among ... [more ▼]

The launch of the European Higher Education Area (EHEA) in 2010 posed many of the central questions already asked of the Bologna Process (BP) with a renewed urgency, reflecting a growing sense among participants of a possible exhaustion of the initial process. Taking as its point of departure the irrevocably “soft law” character of the BP as a pan-European process, the present paper seeks to develop an understanding of how the process might be re-energized with reference to a model of “experimentalist governance” derived from the work of Sabel and Zeitlin. The paper first maps the functioning of the BP to date relative to the strictures of this experimentalist model, particularly identifying the absence of a strong dynamic of iterative policy learning as a major shortcoming. Building on this diagnosis, four broad lessons are then drawn for the possible future development of the EHEA. These lessons concern the role of expertise (and experts) in the process; the representative function of European-level stakeholder groups; the higher education policy discourse of the European Commission; and the reframing of national higher education policy debates in a manner that overcomes an identified logic of “discursive closure”. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 186 (82 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFuture water quality monitoring: improving the balance between exposure and toxicity assessments of real-world pollutant mixtures
Altenburger, Rolf; Brack, Werner; Burgess, Robert M. et al

in Environmental Sciences Europe (2019), 31(1), 12

Environmental water quality monitoring aims to provide the data required for safeguarding the environment against adverse biological effects from multiple chemical contamination arising from anthropogenic ... [more ▼]

Environmental water quality monitoring aims to provide the data required for safeguarding the environment against adverse biological effects from multiple chemical contamination arising from anthropogenic diffuse emissions and point sources. Here, we integrate the experience of the international EU-funded project SOLUTIONS to shift the focus of water monitoring from a few legacy chemicals to complex chemical mixtures, and to identify relevant drivers of toxic effects. Monitoring serves a range of purposes, from control of chemical and ecological status compliance to safeguarding specific water uses, such as drinking water abstraction. Various water sampling techniques, chemical target, suspect and non-target analyses as well as an array of in vitro, in vivo and in situ bioanalytical methods were advanced to improve monitoring of water contamination. Major improvements for broader applicability include tailored sampling techniques, screening and identification techniques for a broader and more diverse set of chemicals, higher detection sensitivity, standardized protocols for chemical, toxicological, and ecological assessments combined with systematic evidence evaluation techniques. No single method or combination of methods is able to meet all divergent monitoring purposes. Current monitoring approaches tend to emphasize either targeted exposure or effect detection. Here, we argue that, irrespective of the specific purpose, assessment of monitoring results would benefit substantially from obtaining and linking information on the occurrence of both chemicals and potentially adverse biological effects. In this paper, we specify the information required to: (1) identify relevant contaminants, (2) assess the impact of contamination in aquatic ecosystems, or (3) quantify cause--effect relationships between contaminants and adverse effects. Specific strategies to link chemical and bioanalytical information are outlined for each of these distinct goals. These strategies have been developed and explored using case studies in the Danube and Rhine river basins as well as for rivers of the Iberian Peninsula. Current water quality assessment suffers from biases resulting from differences in approaches and associated uncertainty analyses. While exposure approaches tend to ignore data gaps (i.e., missing contaminants), effect-based approaches penalize data gaps with increased uncertainty factors. This integrated work suggests systematic ways to deal with mixture exposures and combined effects in a more balanced way, and thus provides guidance for future tailored environmental monitoring. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 147 (6 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFuturistic Project Becoming a Reality: Self-Driving Cars in Luxembourg
Vukovich, Lilla UL; Vysotskaya, Volha UL

E-print/Working paper (2019)

Detailed reference viewed: 129 (20 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailFuzzy clustering with prototype extraction for census data analysis
Chertov, Oleg; Aleksandrova, Marharyta UL

in Soft Computing: State of the Art Theory and Novel Applications (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 130 (6 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailFuzzy control of a drying process in sugar industry
Voos, Holger UL; Litz, Lothar; König, Harald

in The European Congress on Intelligent Techniques and Soft Computing EUFIT 1998 (1998)

Detailed reference viewed: 95 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFuzzy control system navigation using priority areas
Olivares Mendez, Miguel Angel UL; Campoy, P.; Martinez Luna, Carol UL et al

in Ruan, D (Ed.) COMPUTATIONAL INTELLIGENCE IN DECISION AND CONTROL (2008)

This paper presents an improvement for the software implementation (MOFS) of a user adaptive fuzzy control system for autonomous navigation of mobile robots in unknown environments. This improvement ... [more ▼]

This paper presents an improvement for the software implementation (MOFS) of a user adaptive fuzzy control system for autonomous navigation of mobile robots in unknown environments. This improvement consists of a priority areas definition where the environment is measured by a PLS laser sensor, in order to get a reduction in the number of fuzzy rules and also in the computational cost, and hence obtaining improvements in the trajectory. This system has been tested in a pioneer mobile robot and on a robotic wheelchair, odometry sensors are used to localize the robots and the goal positions. The system is able to drive the robots to their goal position avoiding static and dynamic obstacles, without using any pre-built map. This approach improves the way to measure the danger of the obstacles, the way to follow the walls of corridors and the detection of doors. These improvements reduce the zigzag effect of the previous system by making the trajectories significantly straighter and hence reducing the time to reach the goal position. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 121 (5 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFuzzy Controller for UAV-Landing Task Using 3D-Position Visual Estimation
Olivares Mendez, Miguel Angel UL; Campoy; Martinez, Carol et al

in Proccedings of World Congress on Computational Intelligence (WCCI 2010) (2010)

This paper presents a Fuzzy Control application for a landing task of an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle, using the 3D-position estimation based on visual tracking of piecewise planar objects. This application ... [more ▼]

This paper presents a Fuzzy Control application for a landing task of an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle, using the 3D-position estimation based on visual tracking of piecewise planar objects. This application allows the UAV to land on scenarios in which it is only possible to use visual information to obtain the position of the vehicle. The use of the homography permits a realtime estimation of the UAV's pose with respect to a helipad using a monocular camera. Fuzzy Logic allows the definition of a model-free control system of the UAV. The Fuzzy controller analyzes the visual information to generate altitude commands for the UAV to develop the landing task. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 115 (3 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFuzzy Logic Supported Consistency Management in DDVEs
Schloss, Hermann; Scholtes, Ingo; Botev, Jean UL et al

in Electronic Communications of the EASST (2009), 17

Detailed reference viewed: 68 (2 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFuzzy Logic User Adaptive Navigation Control System For Mobile Robots In Unknown Environments
Olivares Mendez, Miguel Angel UL; Fernadez Madrigal, Juan Antonio

in Intelligent Signal Processing, 2007. WISP 2007. IEEE International Symposium on (2007, October)

This paper presents a software implementation of a user adaptive fuzzy control system for autonomous navigation in mobile robots for unknown environments. This system has been tested in a pioneer mobile ... [more ▼]

This paper presents a software implementation of a user adaptive fuzzy control system for autonomous navigation in mobile robots for unknown environments. This system has been tested in a pioneer mobile robot and on a robotic wheelchair, fitted with PLS laser sensor to detect the obstacles and odometry sensors for localization of robots and the goal positions. The system is able to drive the robots to their goal position avoiding static and dynamic obstacles, without using any pre-built map. Our approach learn from user behaviors in the way it can resolve different situations against obstacles or walls.We propose and implement two updates for the fuzzy system. For the implementation of the learning algorithm we use a weighting scheme giving a value for each fuzzy-rule, this value is based on the synapse-weight idea and represent the contribution of each rule in the system output. We also create of a more important sector in the definition of the fuzzy-variables, based on a statistics system that measure the uses of all the sets of the variables in order to contract the size of the rule-base. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 143 (6 UL)