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See detailA Fully-Autonomous Aerial Robot for Search and Rescue Applications in Indoor Environments using Learning-Based Techniques
Sampedro, Carlos; Rodriguez-Ramos, Alejandro; Bavle, Hriday UL et al

in Journal of Intelligent and Robotic Systems (2019), 95(2), 601--627

Search and Rescue (SAR) missions represent an important challenge in the robotics research field as they usually involve exceedingly variable-nature scenarios which require a high-level of autonomy and ... [more ▼]

Search and Rescue (SAR) missions represent an important challenge in the robotics research field as they usually involve exceedingly variable-nature scenarios which require a high-level of autonomy and versatile decision-making capabilities. This challenge becomes even more relevant in the case of aerial robotic platforms owing to their limited payload and computational capabilities. In this paper, we present a fully-autonomous aerial robotic solution, for executing complex SAR missions in unstructured indoor environments. The proposed system is based on the combination of a complete hardware configuration and a flexible system architecture which allows the execution of high-level missions in a fully unsupervised manner (i.e. without human intervention). In order to obtain flexible and versatile behaviors from the proposed aerial robot, several learning-based capabilities have been integrated for target recognition and interaction. The target recognition capability includes a supervised learning classifier based on a computationally-efficient Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) model trained for target/background classification, while the capability to interact with the target for rescue operations introduces a novel Image-Based Visual Servoing (IBVS) algorithm which integrates a recent deep reinforcement learning method named Deep Deterministic Policy Gradients (DDPG). In order to train the aerial robot for performing IBVS tasks, a reinforcement learning framework has been developed, which integrates a deep reinforcement learning agent (e.g. DDPG) with a Gazebo-based simulator for aerial robotics. The proposed system has been validated in a wide range of simulation flights, using Gazebo and PX4 Software-In-The-Loop, and real flights in cluttered indoor environments, demonstrating the versatility of the proposed system in complex SAR missions. [less ▲]

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See detailA fully-autonomous aerial robotic solution for the 2016 International Micro Air Vehicle competition
Sampedro, Carlos; Bavle, Hriday; Rodríguez-Ramos, Alejandro et al

in 2017 International Conference on Unmanned Aircraft Systems (ICUAS) (2017, June)

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See detailFunction First: Systems Ecology of the Human Gut Microbiome
Wilmes, Paul UL

Presentation (2017, November)

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See detailThe Function of Autobiographies in the Construction of a Trans Narrative
Artuso, Sandy Kathy UL

Scientific Conference (2018, April 19)

Detailed reference viewed: 175 (10 UL)
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See detailFunction spaces and classifying spaces of algebras over a prop
Yalin, Sinan UL

E-print/Working paper (2015)

The goal of this paper is to prove that the classifying spaces of categories of algebras governed by a prop can be determined by using function spaces on the category of props. We first consider a ... [more ▼]

The goal of this paper is to prove that the classifying spaces of categories of algebras governed by a prop can be determined by using function spaces on the category of props. We first consider a function space of props to define the moduli space of algebra structures over this prop on an object of the base category. Then we mainly prove that this moduli space is the homotopy fiber of a forgetful map of classifying spaces, generalizing to the prop setting a theorem of Rezk. The crux of our proof lies in the construction of certain universal diagrams in categories of algebras over a prop. We introduce a general method to carry out such constructions in a functorial way. [less ▲]

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See detailFunctional Alloy Modules
Gammaitoni, Loïc UL; Kelsen, Pierre UL

Report (2014)

The Alloy language was developed as a lightweight modelling language that allows fully automatic analysis of software design models via SAT solving. The practical application of this type of analysis is ... [more ▼]

The Alloy language was developed as a lightweight modelling language that allows fully automatic analysis of software design models via SAT solving. The practical application of this type of analysis is hampered by two limitations: first, the analysis itself can become quite time consuming when the scopes become even moderately large; second, determining minimal scopes for the entity types (limiting the number of entities of each type) to achieve better running times is itself a non-trivial problem. In this paper we show that for the special case of Alloy modules specifying transformations we may be able to circumvent these limitations. We define the corresponding notion of functional module and define precise conditions under which such functional modules can be efficiently interpreted rather than analysed via SAT solving and we also explain how interpretation of functional Alloy modules can be seamlessly integrated with the SAT-based analysis of other modules. We provide evidence that for complex transformations interpreting functional modules may result in significant time savings. [less ▲]

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See detailFunctional analysis of a potassium-chloride co-transporter 3 (SLC12A6) promoter polymorphism leading to an additional DNA methylation site
Moser, D.; Ekawardhani, S.; Kumsta, Robert UL et al

in Neuropsychopharmacology (2009), 34(2), 458-467

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See detailFunctional analytic issues in Z_2 ^n Geometry
Bruce, Andrew UL; Poncin, Norbert UL

in Revista de la Union Matematica Argentina (2020), 60(2), 611-636

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See detailFunctional and phenotypic differences of pure populations of stem cell-derived astrocytes and neuronal precursor cells
Kleiderman, Susanne; Sá, Joao; Teixeira, Ana et al

in Glia (2016), 64(5), 695-715

Availability of homogeneous astrocyte populations would facilitate research concerning cell plasticity (metabolic and transcriptional adaptations; innate immune responses) and cell cycle reactivation ... [more ▼]

Availability of homogeneous astrocyte populations would facilitate research concerning cell plasticity (metabolic and transcriptional adaptations; innate immune responses) and cell cycle reactivation. Current protocols to prepare astrocyte cultures differ in their final content of immature precursor cells, pre-activated cells or entirely different cell types. A new method taking care of all these issues would improve research on astrocyte functions. We found here that the exposure of a defined population of pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem cells (NSC) to BMP4 results in pure, non-proliferating astrocyte cultures within 24-48 h. These murine astrocytes generated from embryonic stem cells (mAGES) expressed the positive markers GFAP, aquaporin 4 and GLT-1, supported neuronal function, and acquired innate immune functions such as the response to TNF and IL-1. The protocol was applicable to several normal or disease-prone pluripotent cell lines, and the corresponding mAGES all exited the cell cycle and lost most of their nestin expression, in contrast to astrocytes generated by serum-addition or obtained as primary cultures. Comparative gene expression analysis of mAGES and NSC allowed quantification of differences between the two cell types and a definition of an improved maker set to define astrocytes. Inclusion of several published data sets in this transcriptome comparison revealed the similarity of mAGES with cortical astrocytes in vivo. Metabolic analysis of homogeneous NSC and astrocyte populations revealed distinct neurochemical features: both cell types synthesized glutamine and citrate, but only mature astrocytes released these metabolites. Thus, the homogeneous cultures allowed an improved definition of NSC and astrocyte features. [less ▲]

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See detailFunctional approximations with Stein's method of exchangeable pairs
Kasprzak, Mikolaj UL

in Annales Henri Poincare (2020), 56(4), 2540-564

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See detailThe functional Breuer-Major theorem
Nourdin, Ivan UL; Nualart, David

in Probability Theory and Related Fields (2020), 176

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See detailFunctional calculus in weighted group algebras
Dziubanski, Jacek; Ludwig, Jean; Molitor-Braun, Carine UL

in Revista Matemática Complutense (2004), 17(2), 321-357

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See detailFUNCTIONAL CHARACTERISATION OF THE A30P MUTATION IN ALPHA-SYNUCLEIN GENE IN A PATIENT-DERIVED CELLULAR MODEL OF PARKINSON’S DISEASE
Rodrigues Dos Santos, Bruno Filipe UL

Doctoral thesis (2019)

Our study aims to perform detailed phenotyping of the A30P alpha-synuclein familial case of PD, allowing to identify underlying mechanisms of the disease that may translate into novel therapies ... [more ▼]

Our study aims to perform detailed phenotyping of the A30P alpha-synuclein familial case of PD, allowing to identify underlying mechanisms of the disease that may translate into novel therapies. Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease. Approximately 20% of PD cases are known to have a genetic cause. From these, mutations in SNCA, the gene encoding alpha-synuclein, are linked to an autosomal dominant inheritance of the disease. In 1998, our group discovered the second known point mutation within the SNCA gene, causing an A30P exchange of the peptide sequence. We generated first patient-derived cellular model of the A30P alpha-synuclein mutation carrier, by obtaining fibroblasts from an affected sibling of the index patient, an unaffected sibling of the patient, and an age-matched gender-matched non-PD control. We reprogrammed these fibroblasts into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), and differentiated them into midbrain dopaminergic neurons. We obtained enriched cultures of 80% midbrain neurons (FoxA2+/Tuj1+), with approximately 12 % dopaminergic (TH+), for which we observed electrophysiological activity and dopamine release. We detected a significant reduction of the protein level of mitochondria complexes II, IV, and V in the patient lines compared with the controls, additionally we found a significant impairment of mitochondrial respiration and an increased susceptibility of the cells to oxidative stress. Gene-edited isogenic controls were generated to dissect mutation-specific effects. Furthermore, we investigated mitochondrial morphology and dynamics, and how these processes contribute to the dopaminergic neurodegeneration. Additionally, we were implementing previously established readouts on our high-throughput automated screening platform that will allow us to identify FDA approved compounds with potential to be re-purposed and used as PD treatment. We believe that detailed phenotyping of the A30P alpha-synuclein monogenic case may help to identify underlying mechanisms of the disease that may translate into novel therapies, which would also apply to the more common sporadic forms of PD. [less ▲]

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See detailFunctional characteristics of primary afferents innervating normal and inflamed knee joints of the rat
Schmidt, Robert; Pawlak, Matthias; Heppelmann, Bernd et al

in European Journal of Physiology (2000), 439

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See detailFunctional characterization of alternate optimal solutions of Escherichia coli's transcriptional and translational machinery.
Thiele, Ines UL; Fleming, Ronan MT UL; Bordbar, Aarash et al

in Biophysical Journal (2010), 98(10), 2072-81

The constraint-based reconstruction and analysis approach has recently been extended to describe Escherichia coli's transcriptional and translational machinery. Here, we introduce the concept of reaction ... [more ▼]

The constraint-based reconstruction and analysis approach has recently been extended to describe Escherichia coli's transcriptional and translational machinery. Here, we introduce the concept of reaction coupling to represent the dependency between protein synthesis and utilization. These coupling constraints lead to a significant contraction of the feasible set of steady-state fluxes. The subset of alternate optimal solutions (AOS) consistent with maximal ribosome production was calculated. The majority of transcriptional and translational reactions were active for all of these AOS, showing that the network has a low degree of redundancy. Furthermore, all calculated AOS contained the qualitative expression of at least 92% of the known essential genes. Principal component analysis of AOS demonstrated that energy currencies (ATP, GTP, and phosphate) dominate the network's capability to produce ribosomes. Additionally, we identified regulatory control points of the network, which include the transcription reactions of sigma70 (RpoD) as well as that of a degradosome component (Rne) and of tRNA charging (ValS). These reactions contribute significant variance among AOS. These results show that constraint-based modeling can be applied to gain insight into the systemic properties of E. coli's transcriptional and translational machinery. [less ▲]

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See detailFunctional characterization of novel RhoT1 variants, which are associated with Parkinson's disease.
Grossmann, Dajana UL

Doctoral thesis (2016)

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disease affecting up to 2 % of the population older than 65 years. Most PD cases are sporadic with unknown cause, and about 10 % are familial ... [more ▼]

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disease affecting up to 2 % of the population older than 65 years. Most PD cases are sporadic with unknown cause, and about 10 % are familial inherited. PD is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by loss of predominantly dopaminergic neurons, leading to typical symptoms like rigidity and tremor. Commonly involved pathogenic pathways are linked to mitochondrial dysfunction, e.g. increased oxidative stress, disruption of calcium homeostasis, decreased energy supply and mitochondrial-controlled apoptosis. The mitochondrial outer membrane protein Miro1 is important for mitochondrial distribution, quality control and maintenance. To date Miro1 is not established as risk factor for PD. Using a comprehensive mutation screening of RhoT1 in German PD patients we dissected the role of the first PD-associated mutations in RhoT1, the gene encoding for Miro1. Three mutations in RhoT1 have been identified in three PD patients with positive family history for PD. For analysis of mitochondrial phenotypes patient-derived fibroblasts from two of the three patients were available. As independent cell model served the neuroblastoma cell line M17 with stable knockdown of endogenous RhoT1 and transiently overexpression of the RhoT1 mutant variants. Investigation of yeast with knockout of endogenous Gem1 (the yeast orthologue of Miro1) and overexpression of mutant Gem1 revealed that growth on non-fermentable carbon source was impaired. These findings suggest that Miro1-mutant1 is a loss of function mutation. Interestingly, the Miro1 protein amount was significantly reduced in Miro1-mutant1 and Miro1-mutant2 fibroblast lines compared to controls. Functional analysis revealed that mitochondrial mass was decreased in Miro1-mutant2, but not in Miro1-mutant1 fibroblasts, whereas mitochondrial biogenesis was increased in Miro1-mutant2 fibroblasts, as indicated by elevation of PGC1α. A similar phenotype with reduction of mitochondrial mass was also observed in M17 cells overexpressing Miro1-mutant1 or Miro1-mutant2. Additionally, spare respiratory capacity was reduced in Miro1-mutant1 fibroblasts compared to Ctrl 1 fibroblasts. In contrast, Miro1-mutant2 fibroblasts showed increased respiratory activity compared to Ctrl 1, despite citrate synthase activity was significantly reduced. Both alterations of respiratory activity lead to mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization in Miro1-mutant1 and Miro1-mutant2 fibroblasts, a phenotype which was also found in M17 cells with knockdown of RhoT1. Both Miro1 mutant fibroblasts lines displayed different problems with cytosolic calcium buffering: in Miro1-mutant1 fibroblasts histamine treatment increased cytosolic calcium concentration significantly compared to Ctrl 1 fibroblasts, indicating that calcium homeostasis was impaired, whereas in Miro1-mutant2 fibroblasts the buffering capacity for cytosolic calcium was impaired. The results indicate that mutations in Miro1 cause significant mitochondrial dysfunction, which are likely contributing to neurodegeneration in PD and underline the importance of Miro1 for mitochondrial maintenance. [less ▲]

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See detailFunctional connectivity and structural analyses in the bilingual brain: implications for arithmetic.
Van Rinsveld, Amandine UL; Dricot, Laurence; Guillaume, Mathieu UL et al

Poster (2015, June)

Do bilinguals use the same brain networks than monolinguals when they solve arithmetic problems? We investigated this question by using resting-state functional connectivity and cortical thickness ... [more ▼]

Do bilinguals use the same brain networks than monolinguals when they solve arithmetic problems? We investigated this question by using resting-state functional connectivity and cortical thickness measurements. Recent studies highlighted differences of functional connectivity (e.g. Grady et al., 2015) and of brain structure (e.g. Klein et al., 2014) between bilinguals and monolinguals. However, no study so far has linked these differences to arithmetic problem solving, a cognitive skill that may at least partially rely on language processing. Our study population was composed of carefully selected German-French bilinguals (N = 20) who acquired each language at the same age, leading to high proficiency levels in both languages. These bilinguals all attended university in their second language at the time of the experiment, namely French. Therefore we selected a control group of French-speaking monolinguals (N = 12). Structural and functional images of brain activity were collected using a 3T MRI scanner. Functional scans of resting-state were acquired during a 6-minute session, with eyes closed. A 3D T1-weighted data set encompassing the whole brain was acquired to provide detailed anatomy (1 mm3), which was used both for the co-registration of functional data and for morphometric analyses. Prior to the scanning session, all participants took a behavioral test measuring their arithmetic skill. For the resting-state part of the study, we generated spheres based on ROIs reported in the literature as magnitude manipulation- and language-related areas during arithmetic problem solving (Klein et al. 2013), and addition-related areas reported in a recent meta-analysis (Arsalidou & Tayor, 2011). We used these spheres as seed regions for the analyses. We correlated resting activations between these regions and compared these correlations in bilinguals versus monolinguals. Results showed significantly higher correlations between the three seed regions in monolinguals than in bilinguals (all ts > 2.306; ps < .05), suggesting that regions used to solve arithmetic problems form a different network in bilinguals than in monolinguals. To control for general differences between both populations, we also created two spheres in areas not specifically related to neither arithmetic nor language regions. There were no significant differences between groups in terms of correlations of these regions with resting-state activations. These results suggest that the differences observed in arithmetic problem solving regions could not account for by general differences between groups. In the second part of the study, we aimed at verifying whether the differences in functional connectivity we observed between bilinguals and monolinguals coincide with structural brain differences. We measured and compared cortical thickness in both groups. Then we compared the correlations between cortical thickness and arithmetic skill in both groups (considering differences with corrected p < .001). Cortical thickness of areas commonly associated to language or number processing correlated differently with arithmetic skill as a function of the group: Higher cortical thickness of left pars triangularis, bilateral superior parietal gyri and precuneus positively correlated with arithmetic skill in monolinguals but negatively correlated with arithmetic skill in bilinguals. These results highlight that there are different relations between brain structure and arithmetic skills in bilinguals and monolinguals. In conclusion the current study provides new evidence for differences between bilinguals’ and monolinguals’ brain networks engaged in arithmetic problem solving, even without any arithmetic task during the data acquisition. These findings based on functional connectivity and brain structure analyses also reveal the general involvement of language in arithmetic problem solving in bilingual as well as non-bilingual individuals. [less ▲]

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See detailFunctional Convergence of U-processes with Size-Dependent Kernels
Döbler, Christian UL; Kasprzak, Mikolaj UL; Peccati, Giovanni UL

in Annals of Applied Probability (in press)

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (8 UL)