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See detailExtracurricular sports in European schools: A descriptive study
Marques, Adilson; Holzweg, Martin; Scheuer, Claude UL et al

in International Sports Studies (2014), 36(1), 63-70

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See detailExtragradient methods and linesearch algorithms for solving Ky Fan inequalities and fixed point problems
Phan, Vuong UL; Jean Jacques, Strodiot; Nguyen, Van Hien

in Journal of Optimization Theory & Applications (2012)

In this paper, we introduce some new iterative methods for finding a common element of the set of points satisfying a Ky Fan inequality, and the set of fixed points of a contraction mapping in a Hilbert ... [more ▼]

In this paper, we introduce some new iterative methods for finding a common element of the set of points satisfying a Ky Fan inequality, and the set of fixed points of a contraction mapping in a Hilbert space. The strong convergence of the iterates generated by each method is obtained thanks to a hybrid projection method, under the assumptions that the fixed-point mapping is a ξ-strict pseudocontraction, and the function associated with the Ky Fan inequality is pseudomonotone and weakly continuous. A Lipschitz-type condition is assumed to hold on this function when the basic iteration comes from the extragradient method. This assumption is unnecessary when an Armijo backtracking linesearch is incorporated in the extragradient method. The particular case of variational inequality problems is examined in a last section. [less ▲]

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See detailExtraposition of gerundial and infinitival subject: Factors and figures
Deroey, Katrien UL

in Studia Germanica Gandensia (1998), 44

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See detailExtrapyramidal motor signs in degenerative ataxias.
Schols, L.; Peters, S.; Szymanski, S. et al

in Archives of neurology (2000), 57(10), 1495-500

BACKGROUND: Extrapyramidal motor signs (EPS) are well-known symptoms of degenerative ataxia. However, little is known about frequency and appearance of EPS in subtypes of ataxia. METHODS: We characterized ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Extrapyramidal motor signs (EPS) are well-known symptoms of degenerative ataxia. However, little is known about frequency and appearance of EPS in subtypes of ataxia. METHODS: We characterized 311 patients with ataxia clinically and genetically. Course of the disease and EPS were investigated according to a standardized protocol. Diagnostic and prognostic impact of EPS in subtypes of ataxia was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier plots. RESULTS: Extrapyramidal motor signs occurred in all forms of ataxia, but frequency and type of EPS varied between genetically and clinically defined subtypes. Postural tremor in hereditary ataxias was typical for spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2). Dystonia was generally rare in ataxias, but, if present, suggested SCA3. We observed a parkinsonian variant of SCA3 in which parkinsonism was present in the beginning of the disease and responded well to levodopa therapy, leading to diagnostic confusion. Parkinsonism in SCA3 was independent of CAG repeat length but ran in families, suggesting modifying genes. In idiopathic sporadic cerebellar ataxia (ISCA), EPS are more frequent in late-onset than in early-onset forms. In 50% of ISCA patients with parkinsonism, the diagnosis of multiple system atrophy remained questionable because of normal autonomic function. CONCLUSIONS: Extrapyramidal motor signs can help to predict the genetic subtype of ataxia. Extrapyramidal motor signs were more frequent in genetic subtypes in which basal ganglia affection has been demonstrated by postmortem studies. However, no type of EPS was specific for an underlying mutation. In ISCA, EPS are an adverse prognostic factor. Parkinsonism is especially associated with a more rapid course of the disease. Arch Neurol. 2000;57:1495-1500 [less ▲]

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See detailExtraterritorial Duty to Regulate Transnational Business Activities
Baglayan, Basak UL

Presentation (2019, October)

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See detailExtreme response style and faking: Two sides of the same coin?
Ziegler, M.; Kemper, Christoph UL

in Winker, P.; Menold, N.; Porst, R. (Eds.) Interviewers deviations in surveys – Impact, reasons, detection and prevention (2013)

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See detailExtreme Returns in the European Financial Crisis
Chouliaras, Andreas UL; Grammatikos, Theoharry UL

Scientific Conference (2014, September 29)

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See detailExtreme Returns in the European Financial Crisis
Chouliaras, Andreas UL; Grammatikos, Theoharry UL

E-print/Working paper (2014)

We examine the transmission of extreme stock market returns among three groups of countries: the Euro-periphery countries (Portugal, Ireland, Italy, Greece, Spain), the Euro-core countries (Germany ... [more ▼]

We examine the transmission of extreme stock market returns among three groups of countries: the Euro-periphery countries (Portugal, Ireland, Italy, Greece, Spain), the Euro-core countries (Germany, France, the Netherlands, Finland, Belgium), and the major European Union -but not euro- countries (Sweden, UK, Poland, Czech Republic, Denmark). Using extreme returns on daily stock market data from January 2004 till March 2013, we nd that transmission e ects are present for the tails of the returns distributions for the Pre-crisis, the US-crisis and the Euro-crisis periods from the Euro-periphery group to the Non-Euro and the Euro-core groups. Within group e ects are stronger in the crisis periods. We nd that the transmission channel does not seem to have intensi ed during the crisis periods, but it transmitted larger shocks (in some cases, extreme bottom returns doubled during the crisis periods). Thus, as extreme returns have become much more "extreme" during the nancial crisis periods, the expected losses on extreme return days have increased signi cantly. Given the fact that stock market capitalisations in these country groups are trillions of Euros, a 1% or 2% increase in extreme bottom returns (in crisis periods) can lead to aggregate losses of tens of billions Euros in one single trading day. [less ▲]

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See detailExtreme U.S. Stock Market Fluctuations in the Wake of 9/11
Wolff, Christian UL; Jongen, Ron; Verschoor, Willem

in Journal of Applied Econometrics (2008), 23

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See detailExtreme values, means, and inequality measurement
d'ambrosio, Conchita UL; Bossert, Walter; Kamaga, Kohei

in Review of Income and Wealth (in press)

We examine some ordinal measures of inequality that are familiar from the literature. These measures have a quite simple structure in that their values are determined by combinations of specific summary ... [more ▼]

We examine some ordinal measures of inequality that are familiar from the literature. These measures have a quite simple structure in that their values are determined by combinations of specific summary statistics such as the extreme values and the arithmetic mean of a distribution. In spite of their common appearance, there seem to be no axiomatizations available so far, and this paper is intended to fill that gap. In particular, we consider the absolute and relative variants of the range; the max-mean and the mean-min orderings; and quantile-based measures. In addition, we provide some empirical observations that are intended to illustrate that, although these orderings are straightforward to define, some of them display a surprisingly high correlation with alternative (more complex) measures. [less ▲]

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See detailExtremely conserved ATP- or ADP-dependent enzymatic system for nicotinamide nucleotide repair
Marbaix, Alexandre Y.; Noël, Gaëtane; Detroux, Aline M. et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2011), 286(48), 41246-52

The reduced forms of NAD and NADP, two major nucleotides playing a central role in metabolism, are continuously damaged by enzymatic or heat-dependent hydration. We report the molecular identification of ... [more ▼]

The reduced forms of NAD and NADP, two major nucleotides playing a central role in metabolism, are continuously damaged by enzymatic or heat-dependent hydration. We report the molecular identification of the eukaryotic dehydratase that repairs these nucleotides and show that this enzyme (Carkd in mammals, YKL151C in yeast) catalyzes the dehydration of the S form of NADHX and NADPHX, at the expense of ATP, which is converted to ADP. Surprisingly, the Escherichia coli homolog, YjeF, a bidomain protein, catalyzes a similar reaction, but using ADP instead of ATP. The latter reaction is ascribable to the C-terminal domain of YjeF. This represents an unprecedented example of orthologous enzymes using either ADP or ATP as phosphoryl donor. We also show that eukaryotic proteins homologous to the N-terminal domain of YjeF (apolipoprotein A-1-binding protein (AIBP) in mammals, YNL200C in yeast) catalyze the epimerization of the S and R forms of NAD(P)HX, thereby allowing, in conjunction with the energy-dependent dehydratase, the repair of both epimers of NAD(P)HX. Both enzymes are very widespread in eukaryotes, prokaryotes, and archaea, which together with the ADP dependence of the dehydratase in some species indicates the ancient origin of this repair system. [less ▲]

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See detailExzess der wissenschaftlichen Persona. Nation und Pädagogik bei Eduard Spranger (1882-1963)
Priem, Karin UL

in Bühler, Patrick; Bühler, Thomas; Osterwalder, Fritz (Eds.) Zur Inszenierungsgeschichte pädagogischer Erlöserfiguren (2013)

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See detailEye contact, clientele alignment & laissez-faire: the production of public space and neighbourhood in Phnom Penh, Cambodia
Kolnberger, Thomas UL

Scientific Conference (2011)

The struggle to belong Dealing with diversity in 21st century urban settings. Amsterdam, 7-9 July 2011 Eye contact, clientele alignment & laissez-faire: the production of public space and neighbourhood in ... [more ▼]

The struggle to belong Dealing with diversity in 21st century urban settings. Amsterdam, 7-9 July 2011 Eye contact, clientele alignment & laissez-faire: the production of public space and neighbourhood in Phnom Penh, Cambodia Thomas Kolnberger(*) Paper presented at the International RC21 conference 2011 Session: Nr. 12 – Belonging, exclusion, public and quasi-public space (*) Université du Luxembourg, Luxembourg, Research Unit IPSE (Identité, Politiques, Sociètes, Espace) Universität Passau, BR Deutschland Southeast Asian Studies thomas.kolnberger@uni.lu Overview Private, public or quasi-public spaces are terms that seem particularly difficult to apply to non-Western societies: as in the ‘West’, their boundaries are fluid and routinely transgressed, but in ways that are distinctive to the local situation and history. This paper is arguing that these concepts retain practical descriptive power, particularly for the city of Phnom Penh, a case study of demographic extremes, as nearly all her inhabitants could be classified as immigrants. In deed, the Khmer Rouge had forcefully evicted the ca. two million people-strong population of the capital in 1975, virtually erasing all ‘bourgeois urbanity’ during Pol Pot’s Cambodian ‘auto-genocide’. After the fall of the regime, the new socialist government slowly repopulated the deserted metropolis with new urban dwellers. Their social and spatial belonging needed to be set up from scratch. “Who belongs to whom” (in terms of political clientelism and patronage), “who is doing what” (regarding face-to-face control and eye contact investigation), and “who owns what” (concerning redistribution and also new original accumulation of capital) were the essential questions in this ‘struggle to belong’. In this urban setting, people have been employing a mixed set of strategies for implementing ‘belonging’ ever since. Based on empirical surveys (mapping & interviews) and research in Cambodian and French colonial archives, this paper presents the constant negotiations of private and public space in a changing economic environment from three angles: - streets, squares, and parks as spaces of interaction: the spatial inheritance of the French colonialism in a new context - the emergence of different types of gated communities since 1975: at first by spatial inclusion strategies generating patronage networks, then by urban planning separating rich from poor - the economy of espionage and imitation of Phnom Penh’s retail trade: the neighbours’ curious gaze Methodology - The city of Phnom Penh in Cambodia is a case study for a `rush economic evolution´ - This paper aims in one part to highlight the role and influence of place and space for a specific process: the spatial location of business sites in a unique window of opportunity as a self-organizing process `from below´. By applying spatial analysis (GPS mapping), a specific pattern of retail agglomeration and dispersion of this `atomistic´ metropolis could be identified. The analysis is based on fieldwork investigating the use of the city’s space for economic ends. 1,000 kilometres of built frontage (`streetscapes´) with 14,647 cases of land use features (e.g. shops, `pavement economy´ etc.) have been surveyed and mapped. Subsequent to this quantitative part, 100 semi-structured interviews and numerous ad hoc conversations were conducted including a dozen of expert interviews (city administration, NGO, city planners). Results and Thesis - The city of Phnom Penh in Cambodia is a case study for a `subsistence urbanization´ - Much economic geography research has focused on the importance of the social context for various transactions. ‘Face-to-face contact remains central to coordination of the economy, despite the remarkable reductions in transport costs and the astonishing rise in the complexity and variety of information – verbal, visual and symbolic – which can be communicated near instantly’ (Storper and Venables, 2003, p. 43 ). Visual proximity and eye-contact are particularly important in environments of imperfect information, like in Cambodia after Pol Pot. Information was scarce at this time and communication hardware rare. Thus, in Phnom Penh’s initial retail business formation, an ‘economy of espionage and imitation’ provided the necessary information for deal-making, decisions concerning the assortments of goods, prize, and trends. The first merchants and producers were heavily dependent on visual contact ‘around the corner’ and close contact also proved to be beneficial to customers. This specific knowledge and information externality (an externality or transaction spillover is a cost or benefit, not transmitted through prices) could only be reaped by spatial agglomerations. While screening and socialization of network members and potential partners were essential for the build-up of Cambodia’s original clientele-system during the gradual resettlement, visual contact became the decisive steering mechanism for the original distribution of business agglomeration or its dispersion. For a `subsistence urbanization´, the public and quasi-public space are the most important `common-pool resource´. The influx of the population into the city produced a `non-rivalrous´ and `non-excludable´ economic good by the neighbours’ curious gaze. - The city of Phnom Penh in Cambodia is a case study for a `spatial club´ - From a New Institutionalism’s point of view ‘City’s neighbourhoods – residential, industrial and commercial clusters – are like firms, nexuses of agreements and understandings about entitlements to share and pooled resources. They differ from firms in that they are spatial clusterings and in that they cluster around resources that remain to varying extents in the public domain. They are like spatial clubs. Members co-operate by various forms of informal and formal rules and agreements in order to ensure the continued supply and enhancement of shared public domain goods. Municipal government is itself a type of club, delivering collectively consumed infrastructure and regulations from a tax on its citizens, firms and visitors. Communities, in the social sense, are also clubs – delivering collectively consumed benefits such as a sense of belonging, security and culture’ (Webster and Lai 2003, p. 58). This spontaneous `neighbouring´ as ‘rational herding’ (Banerjee 1992; Hung and Plott 2001) helped to reduce transaction costs during the initial resettlement process (and beyond). It can be described as a continuous act of self agglomeration of business, creating bazaar-type streets over the whole of the city, which specialise in specific goods and services forming thus, from a bird’s view perspective, a `mental retail map´ for the inhabitants. This is one side of building neighbourhoods in Phnom Penh. The base for this laissez-faire et laissez passer behaviorism of the government in (micro)economy was the redistribution of Phnom Penh’s real estate amongst trustworthy followers. A `New property Deal´ of first in, first served allocated the built environment piecemeal. In this political economy, two steps are discernable. First, a community-building process regarding the public administration. Each ministry was assigned to a certain area of the city and in a top-down process, starting from the top echelons to the simple civil servants and officials, distributed land and housing. Initially, each responsible could pick `his´ followers and could reward him/her with the allocation of living space, a social structure, which represents a spatially bond replica of the traditional clientelism and patronage-network in Cambodia. These ’strings’ (ksae) formed the first neighbourhoods as a kind of `original´ gated community because each administrative unit was planned to be self-sufficient. Each ‘cité’ (Carrier 2007) was thus clearly demarcated. Its decisions were autonomous, too. In certain areas of Phnom Penh, remnants of this socio-politically gathered community can be found. In a second step, and with increasing immigration, secondary ksae (the mother’s cousin, the friend of a friend) proliferated and the city was being `filled up´. Today, the pattern of co-residence in technically secluded areas of Phnom Penh resembles the typical economical founded example of gated communities as neighbourhoods around the world: the rich and the better off separate from the rest. The once moral economy of the civil war and initial post-conflict years is dissolving. Regulation, commodification and the government’s efforts to demarcate public and private space is replacing/reducing the common good ‘public space’. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Eye of Horus: Spotting and Analyzing Attacks on Ethereum Smart Contracts
Ferreira Torres, Christof UL; Iannillo, Antonio Ken UL; Gervais, Arthur et al

in International Conference on Financial Cryptography and Data Security, Grenada 1-5 March 2021 (2021)

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See detailThe Eye of the Machine: Labor Sciences and the Mechanical Registration of the Human Body
Herman, Frederik; Priem, Karin UL

in Priem, Karin; Herman, Frederik (Eds.) Fabricating Modern Societies: Education, Bodies, and Minds in the Age of Steel (2019)

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See detailThe Eye of the Machine: Labour Sciences and the Mechanical Registration of the Human Body
Herman, Frederik; Priem, Karin UL

Scientific Conference (2017)

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See detailEye tracking correlates of acute alcohol consumption: A systematic and critical review.
Maurage, Pierre; Masson, Nicolas UL; Bollen, Zoé et al

in Neuroscience and biobehavioral reviews (2020), 108

Eye tracking has emerged as a reliable neuroscience tool indexing the eye movements' correlates of impairments resulting from alcohol-use disorders, ranging from perceptive abilities to high-level ... [more ▼]

Eye tracking has emerged as a reliable neuroscience tool indexing the eye movements' correlates of impairments resulting from alcohol-use disorders, ranging from perceptive abilities to high-level cognitive functions. This systematic review, following PRISMA guidelines, encompasses all human studies using eye tracking in participants presenting acute alcohol consumption. A literature search was conducted in PsycINFO, PubMed and Scopus, and a standardized methodological quality assessment was performed. Eye tracking studies were classified according to the processes measured (perception, attentional bias, memory, executive functions, prevention message processing). Eye tracking data centrally showed a global visuo-motor impairment (related to reduced cerebellar functioning) following alcohol intoxication, together with reduced memory and inhibitory control of eye movements. Conversely, the impact of such intoxication on alcohol-related attentional bias is still debated. The limits of this literature have been identified, leading to the emergence of new research avenues to increase the understanding of eye movements during alcohol intoxication, and to the proposal of guidelines for future research. [less ▲]

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See detailEye tracking researches in music literacy in European context
Sagrillo, Damien UL; Buzas, Zsuzsa

Scientific Conference (2015, June 08)

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See detailEye Tracking Studies Exploring Cognitive and Affective Processes among Alcohol Drinkers: a Systematic Review and Perspectives.
Maurage, Pierre; Bollen, Zoé; Masson, Nicolas UL et al

in Neuropsychology review (2020)

Acute alcohol intoxication and alcohol use disorders are characterized by a wide range of psychological and cerebral impairments, which have been widely explored using neuropsychological and ... [more ▼]

Acute alcohol intoxication and alcohol use disorders are characterized by a wide range of psychological and cerebral impairments, which have been widely explored using neuropsychological and neuroscientific techniques. Eye tracking has recently emerged as an innovative tool to renew this exploration, as eye movements offer complementary information on the processes underlying perceptive, attentional, memory or executive abilities. Building on this, the present systematic and critical literature review provides a comprehensive overview of eye tracking studies exploring cognitive and affective processes among alcohol drinkers. Using PRISMA guidelines, 36 papers that measured eye movements among alcohol drinkers were extracted from three databases (PsycINFO, PubMed, Scopus). They were assessed for methodological quality using a standardized procedure, and categorized based on the main cognitive function measured, namely perceptive abilities, attentional bias, executive function, emotion and prevention/intervention. Eye tracking indexes showed that alcohol-related disorders are related to: (1) a stable pattern of basic eye movement impairments, particularly during alcohol intoxication; (2) a robust attentional bias, indexed by increased dwell times for alcohol-related stimuli; (3) a reduced inhibitory control on saccadic movements; (4) an increased pupillary reactivity to visual stimuli, regardless of their emotional content; (5) a limited visual attention to prevention messages. Perspectives for future research are proposed, notably encouraging the exploration of eye movements in severe alcohol use disorders and the establishment of methodological gold standards for eye tracking measures in this field. [less ▲]

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