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See detailEthischer Relativismus. Die Pluralität der Moralvorstellungen als Problem der Moralepistemologie
Heidemann, Dietmar UL

in Heidemann, Dietmar (Ed.) Ethikbegründungen zwischen Universalismus und Relativismus (2005)

Detailed reference viewed: 163 (1 UL)
See detailEthisches zum Lehrerberuf :WEDER HEILIGE NOCH MASCHINEN!
Weber, Jean-Marie UL

in Transfert (2015), 2015(Hiver), 4-5

Einige Aspekte zur Ethik des Lehrerberufes werden hier vorgestellt

Detailed reference viewed: 119 (5 UL)
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See detailEthnic and educational homogamy in Luxembour
Alieva, A; Hartung, Anne UL

in Vivre au Luxembourg (2010), 71

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (6 UL)
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See detailEthnic Enterprise: Self-Employment among Latin American and Asian Immigrants
Pedraza, Silvia; Rivas, Salvador UL

Scientific Conference (1999, August)

Detailed reference viewed: 15 (1 UL)
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See detailEthnic Persistence, Assimilation and Risk Proclivity
Bonin, Holger; Constant, Amelie; Tatsiramos, Konstantinos UL et al

in IZA Journal of Migration (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 54 (0 UL)
See detailEthnic Stratification in Israel
Bar-Haim, Eyal UL; Semyonov, Moshe

in The International Handbook of the Demography of Race and Ethnicity (2015)

Detailed reference viewed: 75 (5 UL)
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See detailEthnicity and Early Childhood: An Ethnographic Approach to Children's Ethnifying Practices in Peer Interactions at Preschool
Seele, Claudia UL

in International Journal of Early Childhood (2012), 44(3), 307-325

Dominant discourses in Germany portray children with a so-called "migration background" implicitly or explicitly as "the Other" in relation to a normative image of "German children". Family origins ... [more ▼]

Dominant discourses in Germany portray children with a so-called "migration background" implicitly or explicitly as "the Other" in relation to a normative image of "German children". Family origins, language, and physical appearance act as important criteria in this process of ethnifying children. Embedded within this discursive framework, my research focus, however, is on the perspectives of the children themselves and how they participate in the social construction of ethnic identities. The paper is based on an ethnographic research in a day care center in Berlin with children from four to six years of age. Participant observation and symbolic group interviews were employed to explore the children's practical enactment and use of ethnifying identity ascriptions in the context of the peer culture. I argue that ethnicity is not a pregiven fact, but practically accomplished and negotiated in children's social interactions. Thus, the research contributes to our understanding of children's agency and competence as well as of the relationality, provisionality, and context-dependence of children's identity constructions. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 94 (8 UL)
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See detailEthnicity and Early Childhood: An Ethnographic Approach to Children’s Perspectives
Seele, Claudia UL

Scientific Conference (2011, May 20)

This paper is based on a two-month ethnographic research that was conducted 2007 in a daycare center in Berlin with 22 children from 4 to 6 years of age. Despite being born and raised in Germany, in the ... [more ▼]

This paper is based on a two-month ethnographic research that was conducted 2007 in a daycare center in Berlin with 22 children from 4 to 6 years of age. Despite being born and raised in Germany, in the dominant discourse most of them would be represented as „migrant children‟ or „children with migration background‟. They thus come to function as „the Other‟ against which a normative version of „German children‟ is constructed. Language, physical appearance and family origins act as important criteria in this ethnifying of children. Embedded within this discursive framework my research focus, however, is on the perspectives of the children themselves and how they participate in the social construction of ethnic identities. Participant observation and symbolic group interviews were employed to explore the children‟s practical strategies in dealing with ethnified identity ascriptions in everyday peer interactions. In line with the „new‟ sociological study of childhood (e.g., James & Prout 1990) I perceive of children as competent social actors who do not just passively receive and imitate adult conceptions of the social order but actively and skillfully join in the construction of the social world. The ethnographic data show that children as young as 4 are able to use ethnic ascriptions as a „social tool‟ (Van Ausdale & Feagin 2001) in their peer interactions. The broad range of practical and situational processes of differentiation and valorization, of inclusion and exclusion, can be interpreted along a continuum from reproducing to challenging dominant constructions of belonging and „the Other‟. The research contributes to our understanding of children‟s agency and competence as well as of the relationality, provisionality and context-dependence of children‟s identities. It helps to contextualize childhood studies within a social theoretical framework about social identity constructions and practices of social differentiation. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 152 (0 UL)
See detailEthnicity and humour in the workplace
Holmes, Janet; De Bres, Julia UL

in Handford, Michael; Gee, James Paul (Eds.) Handbook of Discourse Analysis (2011)

Detailed reference viewed: 137 (2 UL)
See detailEthnicity and Labor Market Outcomes
Constant, Amelie; Tatsiramos, Konstantinos UL; Zimmermann, Klaus

Book published by Emerald (2009)

Detailed reference viewed: 56 (0 UL)
See detailEthnisch-kulturelle Ungleichheit im deutschen Bildungssystem. Zur Überrepräsentanz von Migrantenjugendlichen an Sonderschulen
Wagner, Sandra J.; Powell, Justin J W UL

in Cloerkes, Günther (Ed.) Wie man behindert wird. Texte zur Konstruktion einer sozialen Rolle und zur Lebenssituation betroffener Menschen (2003)

Detailed reference viewed: 126 (4 UL)
See detailEthnografie
Bollig, Sabine UL; Schulz, Marc

in Zimmermann, Miriam; Lindner, Heike (Eds.) WiRiLex - Wissenschaftlich-Religionspädagogisches Lexikon (2016)

http://www.bibelwissenschaft.de/stichwort/100117/

Detailed reference viewed: 98 (2 UL)
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See detailEthnografie der Frühpädagogik
Honig, Michael-Sebastian UL; Neumann, Sascha UL

in Zeitschrift für Soziologie der Erziehung und Sozialisation = Journal for Sociology of Education and Socialization (2013), 33

Detailed reference viewed: 132 (15 UL)
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See detailEthnografie der Frühpädagogik. Einführung in den Themenschwerpunkt
Honig, Michael-Sebastian UL; Neumann, Sascha UL

in Zeitschrift für Soziologie der Erziehung und Sozialisation = Journal for Sociology of Education and Socialization (2013), 33

Detailed reference viewed: 72 (9 UL)
See detailEthnografie pädagogischer Qualität Erläuterungen zu einer Strategie sozialpädagogischer Forschung
Honig, Michael-Sebastian UL

in Schulze-Krüdener, Jörgen; Schulz, Wolfgang; Hünersdorf, Bettina (Eds.) Grenzen ziehen – Grenzen überschreiten. Pädagogik zwischen Schule, Gesundheit und Sozialer Arbeit (2002)

Detailed reference viewed: 53 (1 UL)
See detailAn ethnographic comparison of glocalized French/French-inspired shop names of food and beverage and beauty businesses in Singapore
Ong, Kenneth Keng Wee; Ghesquière, Jean François; Serwe, Stefan Karl UL

Presentation (2012, July)

Detailed reference viewed: 185 (2 UL)
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See detailEthnographie und Dokumentarische Methode
Neumann, Sascha UL

in Dörner, Olaf; Loos, Peter; Schäffer, Burkhard (Eds.) et al Dokumentarische Methode: Triangulation und blinde Flecken (2019)

Detailed reference viewed: 144 (11 UL)
See detailEthnographische Kindheitsforschung
Bollig, Sabine UL

Speeches/Talks (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 114 (0 UL)
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See detailAn Ethnography of Early Education and Multilingualism in Luxembourg: Pedagogical Performance between Monolingual Agendas and Translingual Practices
Seele, Claudia UL

Scientific Conference (2013, June 05)

Lucas (3;6) is playing with Lego animals on the carpet. He takes the lions and puts them into the compound he prepared for them. He comments: “Kuck, e Léiw!” (Look, a lion!) Then he whirls them all around ... [more ▼]

Lucas (3;6) is playing with Lego animals on the carpet. He takes the lions and puts them into the compound he prepared for them. He comments: “Kuck, e Léiw!” (Look, a lion!) Then he whirls them all around and says: “Tout mélanger!” (Mixing everything!) Lucas here seems not only to mix the animals but the languages, too… Linguistic diversity is not only an integral part of Luxembourgian society in general but also of the everyday practice in early childcare settings. This is nothing exceptional. Rather, the increasing diversification of languages, cultures, and identities – or the increasing acknowledgement that these concepts have never been simple and fixed – is a central characteristic of contemporary societies worldwide. Nevertheless, education political and media discourses keep on positing multilingualism as a special challenge that pedagogical practice has to cope with. They call for early language promotion, school preparation, and for the advancement of social integration and equality. While these discourses instantly turn to the programmatic question how multilingualism should be dealt with, thus presupposing a normative understanding of language in education, the present paper asks how these complex demands are actually met in everyday pedagogical practice and how, along the way, linguistic norms are practically accomplished as well as caught into question. The paper draws on ethnographic material from three Luxembourgian daycare centers that were investigated during 18 months as part of my doctoral research. The choice and interpretation of field notes is guided by the central question how linguistic diversity is dealt with in the centers’ everyday routines. The empirical exploration reveals how pedagogical practice is itself constituted within a field of tension between monolingualist agendas and the actors’ translingual practices. The three centers manage this tension differently, thus demonstrating the multiplicity of possible pathways when dealing with multilingualism in early education. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 45 (1 UL)