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See detailEnvironment and settlement location choice in Stone Age Estonia
Sikk, Kaarel UL; Kriiska, Aivar; Johanson, Kristiina et al

in Estonian Journal of Archaeology (2020), 2

The location choice of Stone Age settlements has been long considered to be influenced by environmental conditions. Proximity to water and sandy soils are most typical examples of those conditions. The ... [more ▼]

The location choice of Stone Age settlements has been long considered to be influenced by environmental conditions. Proximity to water and sandy soils are most typical examples of those conditions. The notion of the influence resulted from the evidence from a relatively small amount of sites. During the recent decades the number of known settlements has increased to a level where statistical assessment of relation between environmental characteristics and settlement location choice is possible. To undertake this task we collected data about known Estonian Stone Age settlements and acquired environmental data of their locations using publicly available geological datasets. We provide univariate descriptive statistics of the distributions of variables describing site conditions and compare them to characteristics generally present in the environment. We experiment with a set of environmental variables including soil type, distance to water and a selection of geomorphometry derivatives of the digital elevation model. Quantitative assessment confirmed previous observations showing significant effect towards choice of sandy, dry location close to water bodies. The statistical analysis allowed us to assess the effect size of different characteristics. Proximity to water had the largest effect on settlement choice, while soil type was also of considerable importance. Abstract geomorphological variables Topographic Position Index and Topographic Wetness index also inform us about significant effects of surface forms. Differences of settlement locations during stages of the Stone Age are well observable. The environmental conditions of sites from the pre-pottery Mesolithic follow the general pattern but with the greatest variation. Narva and Comb Ware stage settlement locations preferences are nearly identical to each other showing preference of sandy higher areas near the shoreline and indicating increased site investment. For Corded Ware period a new settlement mode is observable which is not any more directly related to water bodies and can be explained by semi-agrarian subsistence and decreasing dependence on aquatic resources. [less ▲]

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See detailEnvironment Modeling and Simulation for Automated Testing of Soft Real-Time Embedded Software
Iqbal, Muhammad Zohaib; Arcuri, Andrea UL; Briand, Lionel UL

in Software & Systems Modeling (2013)

Detailed reference viewed: 303 (22 UL)
See detailEnvironmental activism and the transformation of “legitimacy” in Luxembourg, 1970 – 1990
Vetterle, Tobias UL

Scientific Conference (2016, March 05)

Detailed reference viewed: 77 (7 UL)
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See detailEnvironmental and Sustainability Education (ESE) in the Benelux region
Van Poeck, Katrien; Wals, Arjen E.J.; König, Ariane UL

in Environmental Education Research (2018), 24(Special Issue 9-10), 1229-1234

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See detailEnvironmental and sustainability education in the Benelux countries: Research, policy and practices at the intersection of education and societal transformation
Van Poeck, Katrien; König, Ariane UL; Wals, Arjen E.J.

in Environmental Education Research (2018), 24(Special Issue9-10), 1234-1250

As an introductory article of a Special Issue on Environmental and Sustainability Education (ESE) in the Benelux region, this paper provides an overview of ESE research, policy and practice in Belgium ... [more ▼]

As an introductory article of a Special Issue on Environmental and Sustainability Education (ESE) in the Benelux region, this paper provides an overview of ESE research, policy and practice in Belgium, The Netherlands and Luxembourg. It discusses the different contributions in this collection with regard to how the central theme of this issue, the relation between education and societal transformation, is approached in each paper. The main characteristics of the ESE research fields in the Benelux are described in general terms, and placed within the context of how ESE policy and practice are organised in these countries. Next, different conceptualisations of the relation between educational and political spaces reflected in the collection are discussed and the varied contributions to this issue are positioned in relation to three distinguished traditions of approaching the place of democracy in ESE. The authors conclude with commenting on how this relates to different approaches to the research-policy-practice interface. [less ▲]

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See detailEnvironmental and Sustainability Education in the Benelux Region
Van Poeck, Katrien; Wals, Arjen E.J.; König, Ariane UL

in Environmental Education Research (in press), (Special Issue),

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See detailEnvironmental bargaining and boundary organizations: Remapping British Columbia’s ‘Great Bear’ rainforest
Affolderbach, Julia UL; Clapp, Roger; Hayter, Roger

in Annals of the Association of American Geographers (2012), 102(6), 1391-1408

In recent decades, the creation of conservation areas has been a significant and contested trend in resource peripheries around the globe, embracing the “remapping” of resource extents, tenures, and ... [more ▼]

In recent decades, the creation of conservation areas has been a significant and contested trend in resource peripheries around the globe, embracing the “remapping” of resource extents, tenures, and values and thereby land use patterns and regional development trajectories. Environmental nongovernmental organizations (ENGOs) have emerged as key actors in the conflicts underlying this remapping, as advocates of environmental values and opponents of vested economic and political interests engaged in large-scale resource commodification. Remapping is contentious because it is inescapably normative, rendering moral judgments and alterations of property rights and the meaning of sustainable development. The outcomes of remapping are highly contingent, driven by environmental bargaining processes that describe the formal and informal interactions among ENGOs, industrial interests, different levels of government, and other actors with conflicting interests, strategies, and alliances. This article explores how conflicts were resolved in the creation of the Great Bear Rainforest on British Columbia’s central coast. Conceptually, the stakeholder model approach to resource conflict is elaborated by emphasizing the roles of ENGOs as advocates and representatives of environmental values within scientific boundary organizations created specifically to be key facilitators in the bargaining process. The study draws on forest policy documents, records of negotiation, surveys of the region’s ecological and socioeconomic structures, and field visits. The analysis reveals the Coast Information Team as the multirepresentative scientific boundary organization that developed a shared, accepted multilayered geographic information system of the region. This map provided a “shared currency” and the basis for agreement regarding (1) land use zoning at multiple scales, (2) ecosystem-based management, and (3) conservation mapping. [less ▲]

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See detailEnvironmental Bargaining in Resource Peripheries: ENGOs and Boundary Organizations in Regional Development
Clapp, Roger Alex; Affolderbach, Julia UL; Hayter, Roger

in Regions Magazine (2011), 282

In recent decades, the creation of conservation areas has been a significant and contested trend in resource peripheries around the globe, embracing the “remapping” of resource extents, tenures, and ... [more ▼]

In recent decades, the creation of conservation areas has been a significant and contested trend in resource peripheries around the globe, embracing the “remapping” of resource extents, tenures, and values and thereby land use patterns and regional development trajectories. Environmental nongovernmental organizations (ENGOs) have emerged as key actors in the conflicts underlying this remapping, as advocates of environmental values and opponents of vested economic and political interests engaged in large-scale resource commodification. Remapping is contentious because it is inescapably normative, rendering moral judgments and alterations of property rights and the meaning of sustainable development. The outcomes of remapping are highly contingent, driven by environmental bargaining processes that describe the formal and informal interactions among ENGOs, industrial interests, different levels of government, and other actors with conflicting interests, strategies, and alliances. This article explores how conflicts were resolved in the creation of the Great Bear Rainforest on British Columbia's central coast. Conceptually, the stakeholder model approach to resource conflict is elaborated by emphasizing the roles of ENGOs as advocates and representatives of environmental values within scientific boundary organizations created specifically to be key facilitators in the bargaining process. The study draws on forest policy documents, records of negotiation, surveys of the region's ecological and socioeconomic structures, and field visits. The analysis reveals the Coast Information Team as the multirepresentative scientific boundary organization that developed a shared, accepted multilayered geographic information system of the region. This map provided a “shared currency” and the basis for agreement regarding (1) land use zoning at multiple scales, (2) ecosystem-based management, and (3) conservation mapping. [less ▲]

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See detailEnvironmental bargaining: Power struggles and decision-making over Tasmania and British Columbia's old-growth forests
Affolderbach, Julia UL

in Economic Geography (2011), 87(2), 181-206

Over the past few decades, conflicts over resources have increased in scale and intensity. They are frequently dominated by environmental nongovernmental organizations (ENGOs) that fight, boycott, lobby ... [more ▼]

Over the past few decades, conflicts over resources have increased in scale and intensity. They are frequently dominated by environmental nongovernmental organizations (ENGOs) that fight, boycott, lobby, and negotiate with other interest groups to privilege nonindustrial, particularly environmental, values of resources. This article proposes an environmental bargaining framework to analyze the many and varied forms of interactions and processes through which ENGOs seek to change existing practices and decision structures. Drawing on political economy and political ecology approaches, environmental bargaining recognizes the importance of multiple perspectives, strategies of actors, and the regional context. Conceptually, the article interprets environmental conflicts along two dimensions: the distribution of power between actors and forms of interaction ranging from confrontational to collaborative. Examples from British Columbia, Canada, and Tasmania, Australia, reveal the value of comparative perspectives and the importance of the regional context that determines behavior and relationships between actors. While confrontational action has brought considerable change to Tasmania's forests, the example from British Columbia suggests that collaborative forms of decision making that are based on a balance of power have more potential to protect environmental values and bring peace to the woods. [less ▲]

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See detailEnvironmental Cheminformatics to Identify Unknown Chemicals and their Effects
Schymanski, Emma UL

Scientific Conference (2019)

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See detailEnvironmental Cheminformatics: Case study of Thirdhand Smoke in House Dust
Schymanski, Emma UL; Torres, Sonia; Ramirez, Noeia

Presentation (2020)

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See detailEnvironmental economic geography and environmental inequality: challenges and new research prospects
Braun, Boris; Oßenbrügge; Schulz, Christian UL

in Zeitschrift für Wirtschaftsgeographie (2018), 62(2), 120-134

The environmental dimension and sustainability- related issues have increasingly gained momentum in Economic Geography. This paper argues that integrating the inequality perspective into Environmental ... [more ▼]

The environmental dimension and sustainability- related issues have increasingly gained momentum in Economic Geography. This paper argues that integrating the inequality perspective into Environmental Economic Geography (EEG) and trying to disentangle the manifold interrelationships between economic, social, and environmental disadvantage could be worthwhile efforts. Based on three case studies – the debate on urban environmental justice in German cities, the spread of alternative food systems and food-sharing initiatives in Germany, and the socially selective migration in hazard prone areas in rural coastal Bangladesh – we demonstrate that aspects of social inequality indeed matter for EEG thinking. [less ▲]

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See detailEnvironmental effects on the development of crystallized and fluid cognition
Engel de Abreu, Pascale UL

Presentation (2011, February)

Detailed reference viewed: 41 (1 UL)
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See detailEnvironmental enrichment and physical exercise revert behavioral and electrophysiological impairments caused by reduced adult neurogenesis
Sakalem, Marna Eliana; Seidenbecher, Thomas; Zhang, Mingyue et al

in Hippocampus (2016)

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See detailEnvironmental indicators for the evaluation of consumption patterns: the case of Luxembourg
Hild, Paula UL; Mey, Morgane; Jury, Colin et al

Speeches/Talks (2010)

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See detailThe Environmental Kuznets Curve semi-parametrically revisited
Bertinelli, Luisito UL; Strobl, Eric

in Economics Letters (2005), 88(3), 350-357

This paper re-examines the existence of an Environmental Kuznets Curve (EKC) across countries using a semi-parametric regression estimator, which places no restrictions on the functional form. Our results ... [more ▼]

This paper re-examines the existence of an Environmental Kuznets Curve (EKC) across countries using a semi-parametric regression estimator, which places no restrictions on the functional form. Our results using cross-country panel data on Sulfur and Carbon Dioxide strongly suggest that the relationship between wealth and environmental degradation is not bell-shaped, as suggested by an EKC. Rather that there is a positive link for the very poorest countries and no clear relationshipfor richer countries.<P>(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.) [less ▲]

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See detailEnvironmental Policy and the Size Distribution of Firms
Coria, Jessica; Kyriakopoulou, Efthymia UL

E-print/Working paper (2015)

In this paper we analyze the e¤ects of environmental policies on the size distribution of firms. We model a stationary industry where the observed size distribution is a solution to the profit ... [more ▼]

In this paper we analyze the e¤ects of environmental policies on the size distribution of firms. We model a stationary industry where the observed size distribution is a solution to the profit maximization problem of heterogeneous firms that di¤er in terms of their energy e¢ ciency. We compare the equilibrium size distribution under emission taxes, uniform emission standards, and performance standards. Our results indicate that, unlike emission taxes and performance standards, emission standards introduce regulatory asymmetries favoring small firms. These asymmetries cause significant detrimental e¤ects on total output and total welfare, yet lead to reduced emissions and might help preserve small businesses. [less ▲]

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See detailEnvironmental Policy, First Nature Advantage and the Emergence of Economic Clusters
Kyriakopoulou, Efthymia UL; Xepapadeas, Anastasios

in Regional Science and Urban Economics (2013), 19(3),

We explain the spatial concentration of economic activity when the cost of environmental policy – which is increasing in the concentration of pollution – acts as a centrifugal force, while positive ... [more ▼]

We explain the spatial concentration of economic activity when the cost of environmental policy – which is increasing in the concentration of pollution – acts as a centrifugal force, while positive knowledge spillovers and a site with natural cost advantage act as centripetal forces. We study the agglomeration effects caused by trade-offs between centripetal and centrifugal forces which eventually determine the distribution of economic activity across space. The equilibrium solution with spatially myopic environmental policy results either in a monocentric or in a polycentric city with the major cluster at the natural advantage site. The regulator's optimum results in a bicentric city, which suggests that when environmental policy is spatially optimal, the natural advantage sites do not act as attractors of economic activity. In general, our results suggest that sites with inherent advantages can lose their comparative advantage when social costs at these spatial points are taken into account. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 82 (2 UL)
See detailEnvironmental proteomics, a new window on microbial community function
Wilmes, Paul UL

Scientific Conference (2006, July)

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (0 UL)